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‘Coco’ First Look: Pixar’s Multicultural Message Will Make Waves in Trump’s America

‘Coco’ First Look: Pixar’s Multicultural Message Will Make Waves in Trump’s America
Coco,” Pixar’s love letter to Mexico and the Day of the Dead festival, couldn’t come at a better time for the animation studio and the country. It’s Pixar’s first original movie in two years and offers a vital cultural remedy to Trump’s nationalistic fervor (with an all-Latino cast that includes “Mozart in the Jungle’s” Gael Garcia Bernal, Benjamin Bratt, Renée Victor, and newcomer Anthony Gonzalez).

“In a time when the political climate seems very much divisive, it fills my heart with hope that a masterful filmmaker like Lee Unkrich is using his and Pixar’s considerable talents to showcase the people and culture of our beloved Mexico,” said Jorge Guitierrez, director of the first Day of the Dead animated feature, “The Book of Life,” produced by Guillermo del Toro in 2014. “I will be there on ‘Coco’s’ opening night with my whole family, living and remembered.
See full article at Indiewire »

Disney Legend Marty Sklar Dead at 83

  • TMZ
Marty Sklar, legendary Imagineer and designer of Disney parks, died Thursday at his home in the Hollywood Hills. Sklar was one of the company's last remaining links to Walt Disney. He started with Disney in 1955 and helped Walt market Disney World and Epcot Center. He went on to become the Mouse House's top Imagineer -- supervising the design of its parks in Paris, Tokyo and Shanghai. He officially retired in 2009 as an Imagineering ambassador and,
See full article at TMZ »

Disney World: Mickey Mouse, ‘Toy Story,’ ‘Guardians,’ and More Score Attractions

Disney World: Mickey Mouse, ‘Toy Story,’ ‘Guardians,’ and More Score Attractions
The D23 Expo wasn’t just about Disney’s slate of animated and live-action adventures this year, because we got some real world updates from the House of Mouse as well. Walt Disney Parks and Resorts has confirmed that Mickey Mouse’s very own ride will soon be coming to Disney World in Orlando, Fla.

Following the onstage presentations of “Wreck-It Ralph 2,” “A Wrinkle in Time,” “Aladdin,” and many others this weekend, Disney Parks chairman Bob Chapek took to the stage to confirm the “first ever ride-through attraction built entirely around Mickey Mouse” on Saturday.

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Disney Parks Chairman Hints at More Marvel Attractions to Come

Apparently, the ride will be similar to the “Pirates of the Caribbean” and “It’s a Small World” attractions in that it’s a tour — à la Steamboat Willie — only Mickey’s ride will be in “2.5-d” (No 3-D glasses required). Instead of Mickey operating a boat, Goofy
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Disney’s ‘Star Wars’-Themed Lands Get Official Name

Disney’s ‘Star Wars’-Themed Lands Get Official Name
A galaxy far, far away just got a little closer.

Disney’s “Star Wars”-themed lands coming in 2019 to Disneyland and Disney World have an official name — “Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge.”

The announcement came on Saturday during Disney’s D23 expo, and one day after the company released a first look at the attractions in the parks.

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Star Wars Land: First Look at Disney Attractions Unveiled

“Both ‘Star Wars’-inspired lands will transport guests to a never-before-seen planet, a remote trading port, and one of the last stops before Wild Space, where ‘Star Wars’ characters and their stories come to life,” Disney said in a blog post about the expansion.

“Here, guests will find themselves in the middle of the action at two signature attractions: one that lets guests take the controls of Millennium Falcon on a customized secret mission, and an epic ‘Star Wars’ adventure that puts guests in the middle of a
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sip Your Way Around the World With These City-Themed Starbucks Mugs

  • PEOPLE.com
Sip Your Way Around the World With These City-Themed Starbucks Mugs
A version of this article originally appeared on TravelandLeisure.com.

There’s no better time to reminisce about a great vacation than when you’re back at work trying to recuperate with a hot cup of coffee. That’s all part of the allure of the Starbucks collection of city-themed mugs. Well, that and you can pick them up in Starbucks locations around the world, from Qatar to Hong Kong to Tennessee.

The mugs — which come decorated with local flavors, sites, and monuments — have an avid fan base of collectors always looking for one more cup to add to their stockpile.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

black-ish Season 3 Premiere Recap: Epcot and Epiphanies

black-ish Season 3 Premiere Recap: Epcot and Epiphanies
Hell hath no fury like black-ish‘s Dre Johnson, decked out in Mickey Mouse ears and ready to tell his kids where to go and how to get there.

But that moment happens toward the end of black-ish‘s Season 3 premiere, which was shot on location at Disney World in Orlando, Fla., so let’s back up and look at how the Johnsons get into a brawl at the happiest place on Earth.

PhotosFall TV Spectacular: Exclusive Scoop and Photos on black-ish and 41 More Returning Favorites!

The episode begins with Dre explaining that “everybody loves special treatment,” so he’s
See full article at TVLine.com »

black-ish Season 3 Premiere: Ep Teases Dismal Disney Trip for the Johnsons

black-ish Season 3 Premiere: Ep Teases Dismal Disney Trip for the Johnsons
Mickey Mouse has no idea what he’s in for.

As teased in our Fall Preview Spectacular, black-ish‘s central family travels to Disney World in Orlando, Fla., in the Season 3 premiere. To ensure that his kids get the most out of their time on the property — which includes Epcot Center, Disney’s Animal Kingdom, Disney Studios, etc. — Dre hires a VIP guide (played by Community‘s Jim Rash) to squire the family around the parks.

RelatedFall TV 2016: Your Handy Calendar of 120+ Season and Series Premiere Dates

The initial results, series creator Kenya Barris tells TVLine, are less than
See full article at TVLine.com »

Famed Disney Artist and The Jungle Book Illustrator Frank Armitage Dies at 91

  • PEOPLE.com
Famed Disney Artist and The Jungle Book Illustrator Frank Armitage Dies at 91
Frank Armitage, who contributed artwork to Disney classics like The Jungle Book and Mary Poppins, has died at the age of 91. The famed illustrator died on Monday of age-related causes at his home in Paso Robles, California, Disney Animation Studios VP of Communications Howard Green announced, according to The Hollywood Reporter. In addition to his work in animation, Armitage contributed to murals and theme park designs around the world along with his wife, Karen Connolly Armitage, according to their website Armitage Images. The Melbourne, Australia, native began working for Disney in 1952 and his first project involved working on animation for Lady and the Tramp.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Walt Years

When the work of the Walt Disney Company is referenced in popular culture, it is often generalized and boiled down to princesses, Mickey Mouse, and fireworks over Cinderella’s castle as music swells. (“Get your Disney World vacation planning DVD today!”) Unfortunately, this is an extremely simplified image of the company and its legacy in feature films. In the 77 years since Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, the Walt Disney Company’s feature films have gone through distinctive eras. There was the rise of Disney live-action, the decade following Walt Disney’s death, the era of acquisition (Marvel, LucasFilm), and the first and second animation renaissance periods, to name a few.

To give a broader view of the Walt Disney feature film, it is easiest to look at some of these specific eras and pick out the good, the best, and the worst representations of that era. This is by
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Entertainment Geekly: My Top 100 Disney Things, off the top of my head

Entertainment Geekly: My Top 100 Disney Things, off the top of my head
Entertainment Geekly is a weekly column that examines contemporary pop culture through a geek lens and simultaneously examines contemporary geek culture through a pop lens. So many lenses! Click here for past columns.

Last week I wrote a long and rant-y column about the Disney Myth, as constructed in Saving Mr. Banks and deconstructed in Escape From Tomorrow. In an effort to prove I’m not the world’s biggest grouch — and because I spent the past week in the metaphorical Disneyland known as “being back home with my family for the holidays” — I decided to try an experiment that
See full article at EW.com - PopWatch »

'Frozen' Review: 10 Things to Know About Disney's New Animated Fairy Tale

It's taken the Walt Disney Company more than 70 years to bring Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen" to the big screen. Originally conceived by Walt himself in the studio's post-war period, it was eventually attempted (and canceled) at least a half-dozen times in the decades that followed, taking a number of different permutations (including, briefly, a Disneyland attraction and a potential Pixar film).

But now it's here. And it was worth the wait.

The story of Anna (Kristen Bell) and Elsa (Idina Menzel), two characters from a vaguely Scandinavian storybook kingdom who find themselves locked into an eternal winter after Elsa unwittingly unleashes her frosty powers (in glorious 3D, no less).

Of course, the question is: Does "Frozen" recapture the classic Disney magic, or is doomed to go the way of "Home on the Range" or "Atlantis: The Lost Empire?" Read on to find out!

1. It's Very Different From
See full article at Moviefone »

Fantastic Fest 2013, Day Two Report: Ninjas and Disney and vampires, oh my

The day began as all days should probably begin: with a sold-out crowd taking shots of Jack Daniels to ward off the cat flu. The day ended as all days should close: with an exceptionally lively and entertaining martial-arts film made by a group of passionate people who know how to kick ass. Yes, Day Two of Fantastic Fest 2013 was a predictably unpredictable and wild ride. It is, perhaps, fitting that spending the entire day–by which I mean 13-plus hours–at the Alamo Drafthouse Lakeline reminded me very much of the vacations I’ve spent with my wife at the Walt Disney World and Disneyland resorts. No, there were no costumed characters, no meet-and-greets with beloved cult movie figures, or literal attractions. But Day Two was one of those days where I realized how much I had done over the course of just one day. It’s hard to
See full article at SoundOnSight »

'Escape From Tomorrow' Trailer: Disney World is a Real Scary Trip

If you've not yet read the story of how noob writer-director Randy Moore pulled a giant one over on the House of Mouse itself by sneakily filming his horror movie "Escape From Tomorrow" within the very unpermissive walls of Walt Disney World and Disneyland, well, it's a doozy alright (and a real wonder that he's not still neck deep in litigation over it, too).

In a nutshell, Moore used his own experience of living, in his words, "a very artificial childhood, brought on by our cultural obsession with these fake, manufactured worlds of so-called fantasy" with his father in Orlando, Fla. — a.k.a. the global hub of all-things-theme park — to create the story of a dad who starts to go a lot berserk at the Magic Kingdom during a family vacay. This first trailer for the film certainly seems to give an adequate preview of the level of mental
See full article at NextMovie »

The Perfect American: Waking the dark side of Walt Disney

It may not be true that Walt Disney wanted to be cryogenically frozen, but Philip Glass's new opera about the last months of his life explores the man behind the myth. Nicholas Wroe meets its director, Phelim McDermott

It was remarkably soon after Walt Disney's death in 1966 that the urban myth emerged of his body being cryogenically frozen in the hope that one day, pending advances in medical science, he might be brought back to life. "Of course it was absolute nonsense," says Phelim McDermott, director of Philip Glass's new opera about Disney, The Perfect American, which opens at the English National Opera . "But for some reason, this was a myth that people wanted to believe. One of our singers grew up in Florida and says, when he was a kid, everyone just knew that Disney was underneath the Epcot Centre. And after a while, these myths can
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Disney World's New Fantasyland: The Princesses Open Their Own Castles

  • PEOPLE.com
Disney World's New Fantasyland: The Princesses Open Their Own Castles
Poor Cinderella may not have a stocking to hang by the chimney with care, but she does have that choice bit of Florida real estate: her own castle smack in the middle of Walt Disney World's Magic Kingdom. This season, she isn't the only Disney princess with a stronghold to call home. Ariel from The Little Mermaid and Belle from Beauty and the Beast now boast their own splashy attractions in the recently launched New Fantasyland, which more than doubles the original 10 acres of the most popular section of the most popular park in the world's most popular resort. (Yes,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Walt Disney: The Original Master “Imagineer”

Full disclosure: when I was a kid, I didn’t like Disney cartoons. My family took me to all of them, new and the regularly re-released: Pinocchio (1940), Bambi (1942), Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937), Lady and the Tramp (1955). And we went to see the live-action Disney flicks, too: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954), The Shaggy Dog (1959), The Absent-Minded Professor (1961). I watched Disney’s short cartoons on his Sunday night showcase, Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color, and on reruns of The Mickey Mouse Club. Yeah, I saw it all…but I didn’t particularly like a lot of it.

Disney – the brand, not the man – was cute. It was nice. It was sweet. So much so, it made my cavities hurt.

When it came to cartoons, even as a kid I preferred the classic Warners shorts from the 1930s-1950s. They were made for less money and on shorter schedules than the Disney cartoons,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Walt Disney: The Original Master “Imagineer”

Full disclosure: when I was a kid, I didn’t like Disney cartoons. My family took me to all of them, new and the regularly re-released: Pinocchio (1940), Bambi (1942), Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937), Lady and the Tramp (1955). And we went to see the live-action Disney flicks, too: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954), The Shaggy Dog (1959), The Absent-Minded Professor (1961). I watched Disney’s short cartoons on his Sunday night showcase, Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color, and on reruns of The Mickey Mouse Club. Yeah, I saw it all…but I didn’t particularly like a lot of it.

Disney – the brand, not the man – was cute. It was nice. It was sweet. So much so, it made my cavities hurt.

When it came to cartoons, even as a kid I preferred the classic Warners shorts from the 1930s-1950s. They were made for less money and on shorter schedules than the Disney cartoons,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Happy Birthday Walt Disney!

Though his name evokes eternal childhood, legendary animator, filmmaker, businessman and visionary Walt Disney would have turned 110 on Monday, December 5th.

Born in Chicago, Disney and his family moved to Kansas City in 1911. After some world travel, Disney moved back to Kc, where he soon met Ubbe Iwerks, who would become his longtime creative partner and colleague. He went from cartoonist to animator and soon began creating "Laugh-o-Grams" that ran locally in Kc.

His small studio soon went bankrupt and he moved out to Hollywood. Good move, Uncle Walt. After the "Alice Comedies," he created Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, which was promptly then stolen from him by Universal. Painful, yes, but it led to his masterwork.

In 1928, the world met Mickey Mouse (though he was almost named Mortimer - phew!). Walt (with help from Ubbe Iwerks) modeled the noble yet (at the time) scrappy mouse after himself, and after a
See full article at Huffington Post »

Mouse House: Ears to Disney in 2010

2010 has concluded, and for the next two weeks, the Mouse House will explore the highs and lows for The Walt Disney Company over the past year. This time around, I choose my ten favorites (ears), whereas next week’s will feature my ten least favorites (sneers). Of course, any of these options can be debated, so post your thoughts away in the comments section below. So without any further ado, here are the best of the best (in my opinion).

#10 – Mickey Mouse finally speaks to (a few) guests

The Big Cheese has always been the silent type in the theme parks (he’s not a “face character” like Belle or Mad Hatter, who talk to guests), but everything changed earlier in 2010 when Disney unveiled a chatty Mickey. Although this type of character interaction is in its infancy (Talking Mickey has only appeared a few times), this shows the marvels of
See full article at FusedFilm »

The Extra Stuff: 'Tron' Trivia and Quotes

The Extra Stuff: 'Tron' Trivia and Quotes
If you're "Tron" geeks like we are and you're all atwitter about the upcoming "Tron: Legacy," here's a list of fascinating facts and choice movie lines from the groundbreaking 1982 Disney original, "Tron." Zoom through it.

Tron Trivia and Movie QuotesFrom Pong to "Tron"

"Tron" is the silver screen convergence of video games, computer-generated visuals, backlit animation and live-action footage conceived by animator Steven Lisberger in 1976. "That [Magi/Synthavision] reel of computer-generated imagery impressed me terrifically with the computer's capabilities.
See full article at Extra »
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