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The Paul Winchell Show 

The Paul Winchell and Jerry Mahoney Show (original title)
The Paul Winchell Show, or The Paul Winchell and Jerry Mahoney Show, or The Spiedel Show, was a variety program which aired on NBC prime time from 1950 to 1954, starring ventriloquist Paul Winchell and his dummy, Jerry Mahoney. (1950)
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6   5   4   3   2   1  
1956   1955   1954   1953   1952   1951   … See all »

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Series cast summary:
...
 Himself - Host (23 episodes, 1950-1956)
Diane Sinclair ...
 Specialty dancer (17 episodes, 1950-1953)
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The Paul Winchell Show, or The Paul Winchell and Jerry Mahoney Show, or The Spiedel Show, was a variety program which aired on NBC prime time from 1950 to 1954, starring ventriloquist Paul Winchell and his dummy, Jerry Mahoney. (1950)

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Comedy | Family

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Release Date:

18 September 1950 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Paul Winchell Show  »

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1.33 : 1
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TV debut of Carol Burnett. See more »

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Sugar, Sugar
6 April 2016 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

You had to be a kid to like this show a lot. I did when I was about five. I recently watched an early episode of this series and was most impressed - not to say appalled - by the unrelenting promotion of sugar. I am no killjoy, but the sponsor of the show in those days (1950) was Tootsie Roll and most of the episode I saw was a long commercial for the candy, interrupted only by occasional ventriloquism and low comedy, plus the audience of children was practically showered in free candy. There was a competition between a girl and a boy to see which could pick up a Tootsie Roll while wearing boxing gloves. The girl won and she was awarded a humongous box of Tootsie Rolls. The boy was given a consolation prize of a slightly less humongous box of Tootsie Rolls. (This show appears to be the origin of the ethos that has everyone getting a participation trophy.) Later in the series, they must have changed sponsors, for I remember the commercials for Nestles. But notice, more sugar! The best thing about the show was Paul Winchell's skill at making ventriloquism look effortless. Winch was, indeed, a master. Jerry Mahoney, his main puppet, could get away with being the horny dummy, even on a kids' show. Introduced to a thirteen-year-old Girl Scout, Jerry says, "I like Girl Scout cookies, and she's a real cookie." (Leer, leer, wink, wink) I learned one thing, which is that Jerry's less intelligent puppet-friend, Knucklehead, was not surnamed "Smith" as I had always thought, but "Smiff".

There was also a cleverly executed if conceptually silly bit about Winchell teaching his human sidekick, Milt, a secret handshake. Having executed it, they found that they could not disengage their interlocked fingers. "How do we get out of this?" asks Milt. "I don't know," says Winch, "that's another secret." In retrospect, this is not a program for adults and loses points from me for the lameness of much of the humor plus the excessive time spent selling sugar to children. After watching it, I needed to have my blood tested.


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