5.6/10
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Timeline (2003)

A group of archaeologists become trapped in the past when they go there to retrieve a friend. The group must survive in 14th century France before they can escape back to the 21st Century.

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Writers:

(novel), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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3,810 ( 126)

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Professor Johnston
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Steve Kahan ...
Baker
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Arnaut's Deputy
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Storyline

In this case, a group of archaeologists and combat experts led by Paul Walker and Frances O'Connor use a "3-D fax machine" (so much for technobabble!) to time-travel back to France in 1357, in hopes of retrieving Walker's father and returning safely to the present. No such luck! Fending for themselves against marauding hordes of medieval French warriors at war with the invading British, these semi-intrepid travelers find their body count rising, and the deadline for their return home is rapidly approaching. Written by Anthony Pereyra {hypersonic91@yahoo.com}

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

They had to travel into the past to save the future See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for intense battle sequences and brief language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

26 November 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Prisonniers du temps  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$80,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$8,440,629 (USA) (28 November 2003)

Gross:

$19,480,739 (USA) (13 February 2004)
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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film was originally slated to be released in the fall of 2002, however the studio was not happy with the Richard Donner's cut of the film, which included a prologue explaining the disappearance of the Billy Connolly character in the film and contained Jerry Goldsmith's original score for the film. Donner was then forced to re-cut the film by Paramount and asked Goldsmith to edit down his score to the re-cut version of the film, which also prompted another release date by the studio to March 2003. Paramount, particularly studio head Sherry Lansing, was again unhappy with Donner's second cut of the film that he had delivered which completely had eliminated the Billy Connolly prologue, which was essential to the both the Michael Crichton novel and the film's backstory, which was originally scored by Goldsmith as a cue called "The Dig" and the musical recording slate number of 1M1. Donner was forced to re-cut the film once more and the film was again delayed to unspecified date and again Goldsmith was asked to return to the project. At this point, Goldsmith's health was deteriorating due to cancer and had recently begin to score Looney Tunes: Back in Action (2003) for his friend Joe Dante, a project which required the assistance of composer John Debney for additional music and would also be his last score as he would pass away on July 28, 2004. Donner really wanted Goldsmith to stay on, but could not for those reasons and liked the score that he had written for the first cut of the film. Paramount then hired composer Brian Tyler, who had written the music for the film, The Hunted (2003), which was released that March in place of Timeline. Tyler would score almost all the identical scenes in which Goldsmith originally scored and each score recorded by both Goldsmith and Tyler are the same length at 74 minutes. The final cut of the film would be 116 minutes from its original 136 min cut, mainly the Billy Connolly prologue clearly absent from re-cut version and the final cut, which proves that the film was clearly interfered with by the studio. Goldsmith's and Tyler's music would be released respectively by Varese Sarabande Records. See more »

Goofs

When Chris and Kate are in the monastery in 14th century France, and first discover the tunnel and start to crawl through it, one of them knocks over a candle. In the next shot it is back standing upright, as if it was never knocked over, without anyone picking it up. See more »

Quotes

Lord Oliver: My God, it's a miracle, a quiet Frenchman.
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Connections

Referenced in Fear of Clowns (2004) See more »

Soundtracks

Just A Little Bad
Written and Performed by Vikkie Rae Jordan
Courtesy of Marc Ferrari/MasterSource
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Barely relates to the novel
17 April 2004 | by (Canada) – See all my reviews

So many important plot elements were left out, that the phrase 'sort of based on an idea by Michael Crichton' is the closest you can get to a relationship to the novel. The most glaring omission is the lack of the radio 'transceivers', which, if you've read the book, were involved in a major plot twist. And, they could have at least made SOME attempt to have the characters speak in 14th century (sounding) languages and used subtitles to give it a more authentic feel. On a positive note, the acting and casting were reasonably good. The action/fighting sequences were done well.

Overall, the movie gave me the feeling that, as so often happens, the producers used the phrase "no one will notice" way too often during meetings.


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