Morvern Callar
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1-20 of 27 items from 2012   « Prev | Next »


Watch: 5 Minute Excerpt From Lynne Ramsay's Olympic Short 'The Swimmer' Plus Synopsis For 'Jane Got A Gun'

1 November 2012 8:51 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Though fans waited a far too long nine years for Lynne Ramsay to follow up "Morvern Callar," she more than met expectations (and surpassed them) when she dropped "We Need To Talk About Kevin" last year. And she shows no sign of letting that long of a span go by between films again. This year has seen two projects come together for the helmer, with her sci-fi take on "Moby Dick," titled "Mobius," getting financing last month, and of course her brewing western with Michael Fassbender and Natalie Portman, "Jane Got A Gun." But this past summer, you may have missed Ramsay dropping a new short film. Indeed, as part of the many events around the London Olympics, filmmakers including Mike Leigh, Asif Kapadia and more were commissioned to create short films (you can watch the trailer for all of them here). And among them was Ramsay who delivered the "The Swimmer, »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Now Lynne Ramsay Is Taking on Sci-Fi, But With a Literary Twist

3 October 2012 1:00 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Typically, when we hear that an upcoming feature will be “sci-fi, with a twist,” it’s cause for major raspberry-blowing, but when the name Lynne Ramsay is attached to such a production, it’s cause for celebration. THR reports (via ComingSoon) that the Scottish auteur (and that she most certainly is) has snagged the necessary producers (and their finances) for an ambitious new project, titled Mobius. Ramsay will direct and co-write the film (along with her husband Rory Kinnear, who she previously adapted We Need to Talk About Kevin with), which is described as a “science fiction-oriented project inspired by ‘Moby Dick.’” Yes, that Melville element is the twist. But a fun one, right? The film is reportedly a “psychological action thriller set in deep space” in which “a captain consumed by revenge takes his crew on a death mission fueled by his own ego and will to control an enigmatic alien.” Oh »

- Kate Erbland

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Lynne Ramsay's Moby-Dick is one giant leap closer to space

3 October 2012 6:16 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

We Need To Talk About Kevin director secures financing for sci-fi version of classic Melville novel set in outer space

Acclaimed British film-maker Lynne Ramsay looks to be one step closer to bringing her ambitious science fiction take on Herman Melville's classic tale of brooding obsession on the high seas, Moby-Dick, to the big screen. The director of Morvern Callar and We Need to Talk About Kevin has secured a finance and production deal with Hollywood producer Scott Steindorff through the latter's Scott Pictures banner, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

Ramsay is writing the screenplay with Rory Kinnear, who collaborated with her on We Need to Talk About Kevin The Glasgow-born director first revealed details of the project on Simon Mayo and Mark Kermode's Radio 5 Live show in October a year ago, where she said it would be shot on a low budget. "We're taking the premise into the galaxy, »

- Ben Child

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Zawe Ashton: 'You get such a film education as an usher'

29 September 2012 4:04 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The Fresh Meat star on working in a cinema in Hackney, growing up on British television and moving to La next year

Zawe Ashton shows me the flip-down seat at the back of the Rio cinema in Hackney, east London, where she spent several years sitting in the dark. "The first film I ushered was Lynne Ramsay's Morvern Callar," says the 27-year-old actress, soon to appear in a new series of Channel 4 comedy Fresh Meat. "I started at 18. Best job in the world. Blockbusters, indie films, classic matinees. I remember watching City of God three times a day for a fortnight. Anyone who's been an usher knows it's a training in resilience. But you get such a film education. And the popcorn's free."

She grew up a few roads away, the daughter of a mum from Uganda (her name, pronounced "Zow-ee", is Ugandan) and an English dad, both »

- Tom Lamont

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Zawe Ashton: 'You get such a film education as an usher'

29 September 2012 4:04 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Fresh Meat star on working in a cinema in Hackney, growing up on British television and moving to La next year

Zawe Ashton shows me the flip-down seat at the back of the Rio cinema in Hackney, east London, where she spent several years sitting in the dark. "The first film I ushered was Lynne Ramsay's Morvern Callar," says the 27-year-old actress, soon to appear in a new series of Channel 4 comedy Fresh Meat. "I started at 18. Best job in the world. Blockbusters, indie films, classic matinees. I remember watching City of God three times a day for a fortnight. Anyone who's been an usher knows it's a training in resilience. But you get such a film education. And the popcorn's free."

She grew up a few roads away, the daughter of a mum from Uganda (her name, pronounced "Zow-ee", is Ugandan) and an English dad, both »

- Tom Lamont

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Greatest Films Directed By Women – Individual Staff List

26 September 2012 2:11 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

 

Justine Smith

Bright Star, Jane Campion

Orlando, Sally Potter

Trouble Every Day, Claire Denis

Cleo 5 a 7, Agnes Varda

A New Leaf, Elaine May

The Night Porter, Liliana Cavani

American Psycho, Mary Harron

Anatomy of Hell, Catherine Breillat

Point Break, Kathryn Bigelow

Everyone Else, Maren Ade

Ricky D

Connection, Shirley Clarke

Wuthering Heights, Andrea Arnold

35 Shots of Rhum, Claire Denis

Meshes of the Afternoon, Maya Derin

Seven Beauties, Lina Wertmuller

The Hitch-Hiker, Ida Lupino

Lina Wertmuller- Swept Away

Meek’s Cutoff, Kelly Reichardt

Headless Woman, Lucrecia Martel

Xxy, Lucía Puenzo

Special mention: 

SkyscraperShirley Clarke

WaspAndrea Arnold

On Dangerous GroundIda Lupino (uncredited)

Wanda

Chris Clemente

Little Miss Sunshine, Valerie Faris

American Psycho, Mary Harron

Lost in Translation, Sofia Coppola

We Need to Talk About Kevin, Lynne Ramsay

Fish Tank, Andrea Arnold

Monster, Patty Jenkins

A League of Their Own, Penny Marshall

Wayne’s World, Penelope Spheeris

Clueless, Amy Heckerling

Point Break, »

- Ricky

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Great Films Directed by Women Pt. 2

26 September 2012 2:07 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

(In Alphabetical order)

Meek’s Cutoff

Directed by Kelly Reichardt

Kelly Reichardt had a stellar if hushed 2000s, and then she commenced the current decade with a film that is already beginning to feel like an unsung modern classic. Meek’s Cutoff is one of those exhilarating instances in which a marriage of disparate styles produces something tricky to imagine, but perfect to behold: a period piece set in mid-1800’s Oregon, shot in academy ratio and classically beautiful for it, but with Reichardt’s signature severe naturalism. The result is so stark and understated that it begins to feel graceful, weirdly epic. A small caravan of settlers (featuring Michelle Williams and a once again devout Paul Dano) hires a guide, big-talking Stephen Meek, to help them navigate the Oregon Trail. As the terrain grows less forgiving and water evermore scarce, the settlers begin to wonder if the route Meek »

- Ricky

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The Words | Review

5 September 2012 10:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

In Need of a Thesaurus: A Tepid Debut Feature With Little to Say

For a film centered on the literary world using literary devices to unfold itself, The Words, the directorial debut of directing duo Brian Klugman and Lee Sternthal, sure in the hell suffers from some tepid writing. A three tiered narrative proves to be the vicious undoing of the film, an ambitious moral tale that’s already been told, several times over. While the directing/screenwriting duo managed to assemble a lucrative cast for their first outing, something must have gotten lost in translation from the page to the screen.

The Words opens with famous author Clay Hammond (Dennis Quaid) reading portions of his latest novel, which shares the same title as this film. As he reads, the story of Rory (Bradley Cooper) and Dora Jansen (Zoe Saldana) unfolds. Rory is a struggling writer, the author of two rejected manuscripts, »

- Nicholas Bell

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Jane Got A Gun Might Have Michael Fassbender Playing Opposite Natalie Portman in Key Roles?

29 August 2012 7:53 PM, PDT | Filmofilia | See recent Filmofilia news »

Lynne Ramsay is the director of three very good films (most recently We Need to Talk About Kevin, which followed Ratcatcher and Morvern Callar) and now she’s in for a western called Jane Got a Gun. The film already has Natalie Portman attached to play “a woman whose outlaw husband returns home barely alive and riddled with bullet wounds. She is forced to reach out to an ex-lover and ask if he will help defend her farm when her husband’s gang eventually tracks him down to finish the job.”

Now it looks like Michael Fassbender could be the main recruit for the role of “the ex-lover Portman seeks out to help her defend her farm”.

This indie film is to be financed by Portman’s production company, and while we don’t have a starting date for the set shoot to report, you can be sure that the »

- Sunrider

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Review: We Need to Talk About Kevin (Blu-ray)

21 June 2012 8:00 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Director Lynne Ramsay’s last film was 2002’s Morvern Callar and involved a woman’s psychological struggle with her life. Her new film, We Need to Talk About Kevin, is an equally troubling portrait of a mother struggling with a hateful child and a husband who refuses to see the light.

Eva and Franklin (Tilda Swinton, John C. Reilly) are a happy young couple in New York City with thriving careers and a cozy apartment. This is soon upended when they welcome a baby boy named Kevin. As an infant, he screams and cries in the company of his mother, only to quiet down and coo around his father.

Kevin is an unhealthy child psychologically, as he has no friends or interest in knowing anyone, including his parents. He quickly draws a line in the sand between his parents, manipulating and pitting them against each other as the he gets older. »

- Derek Botelho

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We Need To Talk About Kevin Blu-ray Review

19 June 2012 4:01 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Lynne Ramsay is one of the prime examples of how directorial talent doesn’t ensure an easy cinematic career. She started her career explosively, captivating Cannes in the mid-90s with her student shorts, before releasing her critically lauded and Criterion-captured freshman feature Ratcatcher in 1999, and the daring Morvern Callar in 2002. But then Ramsay disappeared from the cinematic landscape, plagued with behind-the-scenes creative and financial woes. She spent four years adapting The Lovely Bones, before it was handed over to Peter Jackson for a less than stellar adaptation. She was courted for Jane Eyre, but refused the offer when she wasn’t allowed to adapt the material herself. Her luck began to turn when Lynne Ramsay settled on Lionel Shriver’s We Need to Talk About Kevin. The road was hard, as the filmmaker battled financial woes and rigid timeframes, but Ramsay persevered to create one of the most captivating »

- Monika Bartyzel

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Blu-ray Review: Tilda Swinton Captivates in ‘We Need to Talk About Kevin’

1 June 2012 6:22 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – Many critics failed to take Lynne Ramsay’s “We Need to Talk About Kevin” seriously, dismissing it as an art house retread of “The Omen.” Such a simplistic label fails to take into account the film’s carefully textured portrait of a deeply fractured mother-son relationship. Though the film takes its premise to melodramatic extremes, it does harbor considerable insight into the repercussions of a disconnect between parent and child.

Eva (Tilda Swinton) is the sort of mother who causes strangers to wince while passing her in the supermarket. She can barely contain the intense dislike that she feels for her child. Motherhood is a form of entrapment in her eyes, and her attempts to care for her young son lack any sense of genuine compassion. When she snaps on a hollow smile to calm her crying son, the moment is both chilling and darkly funny. It only gets »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Contest Giveaway: 'We Need To Talk About Kevin' Poster Signed By Tilda Swinton, Blu-Ray, Novel & More

29 May 2012 10:04 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Director Lynne Ramsay made a long-anticipated return to filmmaking, after a nine-year absence, in 2011 with "We Need To Talk About Kevin," and it was worth the wait. A tough but equally rewarding film, the picture starring Tilda Swinton, John C. Reilly and Ezra Miller tells the tale of a mother's fractured relationship with her son, which grows more distant and hostile before he commits an act of unspeakable horror. The film premiered in-competition at the Cannes Film Festival last year, and went on to earn accolades from critics and a plethora of awards and nominations. And we've got some pretty great prizes for fans of the film.

One lucky winner will receive a poster of the film signed by Tilda Swinton, the Blu-ray/DVD combo pack of the movie, as well as the novel by Lionel Shriver. 2 runners-up will snag prize packs that include the novel and combo Blu-ray/DVD. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Natalie Portman to star in Lynne Ramsay western Jane Got a Gun

24 May 2012 8:42 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Oscar-winning actor will also take producing credit for project currently at centre of Cannes bidding war

Nine long years separated Lynne Ramsay's second feature film, Morvern Callar, from last year's critically acclaimed We Need to Talk About Kevin, but the Scottish director can perhaps look forward to a faster turnaround for her next project, after Natalie Portman has signed up for western Jane Got a Gun.

Portman's star has rarely been higher in the Hollywood firmament after winning a best actress Oscar for 2010's Black Swan and it was recently revealed that users of IMDb view her profile more than any other actor. Jane Got a Gun also benefits from a screenplay by Brian Duffield, which made the 2011 Black List of the best unproduced scripts in Hollywood. Portman is down to play the lead, a farmer's wife whose outlaw husband returns home bloodied and near death after his gang turn on him. »

- Ben Child

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Natalie Portman & Director Lynne Ramsay Teaming Up For Western 'Jane Got A Gun'

22 May 2012 11:10 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Since starring in the surprise hit "Black Swan," and winning an Oscar for her troubles, Natalie Portman's been decidedly picky about her choice of roles. It's partly because she became a mother last year, and has been taking a little time off. But also, she's clearly not wanted to rush into a decision, and while films like the Wachowski's "Jupiter Ascending" and Ridley Scott's "The Counselor" have chased the actress, she seemingly turned the projects down. She has decided to return to acting at last:  she'll spend the second half of the year shooting Terrence Malick's double-header "The Knight of Cups" and the film formerly known as "Lawless," before she segues into the contractual obligations of "Thor 2." But it's clearly harder than ever to get the actress' attention.

Unless you're "We Need To Talk About Kevin" director Lynne Ramsay, that is. The Hollywood Reporter bring news that Ramsay, »

- Oliver Lyttelton

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This week's new film events

30 March 2012 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Guardian presents Le Havre/Mark Pagel, London

What has a Finnish-made film about illegal immigrants in France got to do with a renowned evolutionary theorist? Or the Guardian? The film in question is Le Havre, by Aki Kaurismäki, a gentle yet robustly political parable set in the French coastal town of the title, with a similar tone to a previous film, The Man Without A Past. Pagel, meanwhile, is an evolutionary theorist who operates on every scale, from genetic codes to language, culture and the history of human co-operation. That gives you a clue to his take on the movie, but the post-screening discussion could lead anywhere, especially since you can watch the film on the Guardian website, submit questions, read the live blog and watch the film any time in the next two months.

Curzon Soho, W1, Fri

Young People's Film Festival, Leeds

This is the type of »

- Steve Rose

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Page and Screen - Thinking about kids? Don’t read We Need to Talk About Kevin this Mother’s Day

18 March 2012 4:13 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Liam Trim with the latest edition of 'Page and Screen'...

Mother’s Day (or Mothering Sunday, according to my traditionalist Dad) is when we celebrate the unsung heroes of society. Mothers are the underappreciated glue holding together such fundamentals of everyday life as law, order and excessive cleanliness. There is no higher calling than motherhood. Political leaders, from Stalin to Cameron, have recognised that a good mother, providing a solid foundation for a good family, is the perfect platform for a great nation. Who do men beg for in their darkest hour? Not their wives, but their mothers. Whose betrayal pushes Hamlet to the brink of madness? His mother’s. And who saved the day in the last Doctor Who Christmas special? You guessed it, the mum.

In the build up to Mother’s Day, the commercialised clutter clogging up the high streets is physical evidence of the cult of motherhood. »

- Liam Trim

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Mark Kermode's DVD round-up

25 February 2012 4:15 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

We Need to Talk About Kevin; The Greatest Movie Ever Sold; A Useful Life; In Time; Jack Goes Boating

Whatever happens at the Oscars ceremony in Hollywood tonight, you can be sure of one thing: there won't be any statuettes handed out to the very best film of the year. While the board-sweeping success of a near-silent B&W beauty is a reason to be cheerful, not even the rule-breaking brilliance of Michel Hazanavicius's The Artist can outshine the excellence of my favourite film of 2011, which saw the Scottish director Lynne Ramsay making a triumphant return to our screens after a nine-year absence. Welcome back!

Superbly adapted (by screenwriters Ramsay and Rory Kinnear) from Lionel Shriver's supposedly unfilmable bestseller, We Need to Talk About Kevin (2011, Artificial Eye, 15) inhabits a painterly netherworld pitched somewhere between the subtle hues of European psychodrama and the bolder strokes of populist paedophobic horror. »

- Mark Kermode

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The Directors, Cinematographers & More Who Should've Been Nominated For Oscars In 2012

23 February 2012 10:57 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

We're just a few days away from the Oscars, and it's not long before we find out who are going to be the big winners and losers. But at this time of year, it's important not to forget those who slipped through the cracks: there were films released in 2011 that weren't "The Artist," after all.

As we've discussed many times in the past, the Oscars are not necessarily decided on merit. Politics, lack of momentum, no one seeing your film -- all these elements can lead to a seemingly deserving person being overlooked by the Academy. As part of our continuing coverage in the run up to Sunday night, we've picked out ten below-the-line (e.g. directing, writing and technical categories) nods that, while not necessarily more deserving than those who ended up with nominations, deserved to have been in the conversation more. And keep your eyes peeled: a little later, »

- Oliver Lyttelton

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We Need To Talk About Kevin – The Review

8 February 2012 9:59 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

We Need To Talk About Kevin was originally reviewed during the 2011 Stella Artois 20th Annual St. Louis International Film Festival

Imagine yourself as a parent. Now, aside from outliving your own child, imagine the worst thing that could happen. Despite all your best efforts to be a good parent, to raise your child properly, imagine your child does something horrific and unforgivable. Imagine they have done something that turns the entire community against you. Now you are as prepared as you possibly can be for watching We Need To Talk About Kevin, from Scottish filmmaker Lynne Ramsay, whose previous two feature films are Ratcatcher (1999) and Morvern Callar (2002) and both films are extraordinary. We Need To Talk About Kevin is the third feature film written and directed by this exciting new cinematic voice. This also happens to be her darkest film, and perhaps her best film to date.

Tilda Swinton plays Eva, »

- Travis Keune

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1-20 of 27 items from 2012   « Prev | Next »


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