6.4/10
125
6 user

A More Perfect Union: America Becomes a Nation (1989)

| Drama, History
It showed the process it took to write the Constitution of the United States.

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Morgan White ...
Bruce Newbold ...
Edmund Randolph
Fredd Wayne ...
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James Wilson (as James Walch)
James Arrington ...
J. Scott Bronson ...
Robert Morris (as Scott Bronson)
Roderick Cook ...
Nathaniel Gorham
Marvin Payne ...
Rufus King
Steve Anderson ...
Fred Laycock ...
Caleb Strong
H.E.D. Redford ...
Wayne Brennan ...
Oliver Ellsworth
Derryl Yeager ...
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It showed the process it took to write the Constitution of the United States.

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Drama | History

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1.37 : 1
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User Reviews

And excellent docu-drama about the Constitutional Convention
17 October 2004 | by (Providence, RI) – See all my reviews

A More Perfect Union examines the creation of the US Constitution from the perspective of chief author, James Madison. Beginning with trade war problems between states and Shay's Rebellion in Massachusetts, the film follows Federalist Madison's desperate attempts to enlist the aid and involvement of George Washington, the battles with states rights (anti-Federalist) advocates such as Roger Sherman and John Dickinson, his efforts to make both the Senate and the House elected by proportional representation, and his ultimate acceptance of the compromises which ultimately made the Constitution palatable to enough states to be ratified by 1788. For those unfamiliar with the history of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, this is an excellent way to be introduced to the politics and personalities that created the Constitution. Highly recommended for the classroom and the home.


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