7.9/10
156,128
845 user 284 critic

Ying xiong (2002)

A defense officer, Nameless, was summoned by the King of Qin regarding his success of terminating three warriors.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Popularity
2,843 ( 133)

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From $1.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 37 wins & 36 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Broken Sword (as Tony Leung Chiu-Wai)
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Flying Snow (as Maggie Cheung Man-Yuk)
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Moon (as Zhang Ziyi)
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King (as Chen Dao Ming)
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Sky
Zhongyuan Liu ...
Scholar (as Liu Zhong Yuan)
Tianyong Zheng ...
Old Servant (as Zheng Tian Yong)
Yan Qin ...
Chang Xiao Yang ...
Yakun Zhang ...
Commander (as Zhang Ya Kun)
Ma Wen Hua ...
Jin Ming ...
Xu Kuang Hua ...
Shou Xin Wang ...
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Storyline

In ancient China, before the reign of the first emperor, warring factions throughout the Six Kingdoms plot to assassinate the most powerful ruler, Qin. When a minor official defeats Qin's three principal enemies, he is summoned to the palace to tell Qin the story of his surprising victory. Written by Yocke

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

king | china | flying | sword | palace | See All (121) »

Taglines:

One man's strength will unite an empire See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for stylized martial arts violence and a scene of sensuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

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Language:

Release Date:

27 August 2004 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Jet Li's Hero  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$31,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$687,653 (Hong Kong) (27 December 2002)

Gross:

$84,961 (USA) (18 September 2015)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(Director's Cut) | (Theatrical Version)

Sound Mix:

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Maggie Cheung required weeks of training. Even Ziyi Zhang, who earned rave reviews with her martial arts performance in Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000) needed intensive training to become adept with the twin blades she fights with during many of her scenes in Hero. See more »

Goofs

(at around 1h) In the scene where everyone is in white (the white calligraphy brush demonstration scene) there are positioning errors. Snow is on the right, Broken Sword is on the left. While Nameless faces them talking, he looks in the opposite directions. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Nameless: [voiceover] I was orphaned at a young age and was never given a name. People simply called me Nameless. With no family name to live up to, I devoted myself to the sword. I spent ten years perfecting unique skills as a swordsman. The King of Qin has summoned me to court, for what I have accomplished has astonished the kingdom.
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Connections

Referenced in Het glazen huis: Eigen agenda (2005) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Haunting beauty and provocative message
2 January 2005 | by (universe at large) – See all my reviews

Hero is noteworthy on at least two counts.

First, there are scenes of haunting beauty("Duel in the yellow forest" and "Turquoise autumn" to site a couple) that, like the best of impressionist paintings, are so affecting that you will forever see the world in a slightly different way having once beheld them.

Secondly, the overall message of the film is a provocative one. The claim is that a degree of human casualties and suffering may be the optimal path to a better world, especially when the alternative is equally brutal chaos. This is not a popular theme. It has become much more fashionable to be anti-war in all cases. And understandably so, since variations of this logic have often been used in the past to justify atrocities. But the film provides a crisp litmus test for avoiding delusion: action must be taken with a heart void of malice and an unwavering commitment to the broadest possible ultimate outcome of good for all. Can anyone live up to this standard? Several characters in the movie do, each in their own way. If the standard could be met, would the world be a better place? These are questions worth reflecting on that have not been dealt with, to this depth, in any film I'm aware of.


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