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R2-D2: Beneath the Dome (2001)

Collection of short mockumentaries detailing R2-D2's "career", from his English upbringing to his daring bungee jump.

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Bob Hesse ...
Narrator (voice)
Robbie Edwards ...
Robbie Dillingham
...
Bitsie Tullock (as Bitsie Tulloch)
...
Claudia Dillingham-West
Dave Murphy ...
Artoo's Buddy (at age 45)
Morgan Hamilton-Lee ...
Artoo's Buddy (at age 10)
Bernie Hamilton-Lee ...
School Principal
Mary Jo Hamilton-Lee ...
School Teacher
Cecilia Hamilton-Lee ...
School Kid
Phyllis Eblan ...
School Mom
Brittany Eblan ...
School Kid
Benjamin Bies ...
Cute Kid
Anna Bies ...
Emergency Room Technician
Kara Glieden ...
Emergency Room Technician
Wendi Thomas ...
Emergency Room Technician
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Storyline

Collection of short mockumentaries detailing R2-D2's "career", from his English upbringing to his daring bungee jump.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Hero. Legend. Hardware. See more »

Genres:

Short | Comedy

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Details

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Release Date:

25 November 2001 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Artoo-Detoo: Beneath the Dome  »

Filming Locations:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Artoo's bungee jump was performed three times at a real bungee jump attraction located at Fox Studios, Sydney, Australia. The first two times a bungee cord was used, but was not on the third try, which is the footage in the documentary. A special R2 was created for this scene, and was completely destroyed. The emergency room follow-up scene was shot seven months later at Petaluma Valley Hospital, Petaluma, California. See more »

Quotes

Candy Clark: I always liked short guys and Artoo was my ultimate short guy. He had that one great eye. I *loved* looking into that eye.
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Connections

References Starsky and Hutch (1975) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Does what everyone Star Wars fan wants from its friends and acquaintances
28 March 2016 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I never saw the original Star Wars trilogy until I was well into my high school career, but that didn't stop me from having several Star Wars action figures as a young kid. Specifically, I remember three - Mace Windu, C-3PO, and R2-D2. Despite not knowing a single thing about these characters, their origins, or their intricacies, I was drawn to their plastic appearances and their pristine and immaculate detail even as a young child. I didn't need their backstories to have complex, imaginative adventures with them on my ledge overlooking my street. That's the beauty of Star Wars; even if we have no background or knowledge of the characters, most of us can still pick up the toys and create adventures that are just as satisfying to that small candle of childhood nostalgia we still have lit in the back of our minds.

R2-D2: Beneath the Dome, a three-part, twenty-minute mockumentary, takes the lid off the character figuratively and literally to explore the interworkings of one of the most fascinating and intricate characters of the Star Wars universe. Told in a style reminiscent of talk show specials answering the much-asked question "where are they now?," with an aesthetic resembling VH1's Behind the Music show, we learn of "Artoo"'s beginning as an actor and a friend of George Lucas, as struggled to obtain more complex and challenging roles in feature films and TV shows. However, all it took was Lucas to have a bit of faith in his robot companion, and following the success of A New Hope in 1977, R2-D2 became a household name and a movie-star overnight.

As with many celebrities, the fame gets to one's head and a downward spiral ensues, which is what parts two and three of this film concern. In addition to "archive footage," we see interviews with people like Lucas and Artoo's co-stars Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman, and even his pregnant girlfriend Bitsie Tulloch. As a fun and creative exercise, R2-D2: Beneath the Dome is a real treat for Star Wars fans because it ultimately does what every fan wants out of people who view the movies

  • to take the events and the characters seriously. When you start


subscribing a detailed history and resume for a robotic droid, in addition to giving him a girlfriend, I think it's safe to say that you've taken him about as seriously as you could.

R2-D2: Beneath the Dome is a cute film for its casual humor and the way it personifies a character that was instrumental to so many peoples' lives arguably for just being so simple, yet so immaculate. The result is a lively and spirited, with its tongue firmly planted in its cheek and unwilling to move or displace it.

Directed by: Don Bies and Spencer Susser.


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