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‘Wonderstruck’ Colorist Joe Gawler on How Film’s Multi-Period Look Was Created

‘Wonderstruck’ Colorist Joe Gawler on How Film’s Multi-Period Look Was Created
Todd Haynes’ “Wonderstruck,” which screened in the main competition at Camerimage, tells the complicated story of two children, both deaf, growing up in New York during different historical periods, whose paths strangely and magically converge.

To tell this multi-layered story, Dp Edward Lachman, a Camerimage regular and frequent Haynes collaborator (“Far From Heaven,” “I’m Not There,” “Carol”) shot the film on black and white and color film, as well as on digital. Joe Gawler, partner and senior colorist at New York post-production studio Harbor Picture, who has also worked with the two men, tells how he graded the widely varying footage to give the film a seamless look.

How did you happen to get the “Wonderstruck” assignment?

I’ve had a relationship with Ed Lachman for a number of years. I’ve remastered maybe 100 titles for the Criterion Collection, and they brought on Ed to consult on the color. Ed is a real encyclopedia of filmmaking.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Suburbicon’ Review

Stars: Matt Damon, Julianne Moore, Noah Jupe, Oscar Isaac, Gary Basaraba | Written by Joel Coen, Ethan Coen, George Clooney, Grant Heslov | Directed by George Clooney

Legend has it that the Coen Brothers penned this dark satire back in the 1980s, around the time of Blood Simple. So it’s interesting the extent to which Suburbicon feels like a product of our time – that is, a reflection of Us anxieties about race, immigration and social cohesion.

The film’s title refers to a fictional, yet depressingly plausible, 1950s experiment: a 60,000-strong utopian community comprised purely of white people, content and complacent behind a bulwark of quaint picket fences. (The faux promo which opens the film is like something out of a Fallout game.) We join the story at the moment when the first African-American family, the Myers, moves into the neighbourhood.

Suburbicon rapidly descends into criminality. But it’s nothing to do with the Myers.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Ifp Gotham Awards recipients announced by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2017-11-07 17:21:00

Dustin Hoffman to receive an Ifp Gotham Award career tribute Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The Independent Filmmaker Project will present six career honors at their 2017 Gotham Awards, hosted by How To Talk To Girls At Parties director John Cameron Mitchell. Cannes Film Festival Best Director winner for The Beguiled, Sofia Coppola (Director Tribute); Yorgos Lanthimos's The Killing Of A Sacred Deer star Nicole Kidman (Actress Tribute); Noah Baumbach's The Meyerowitz Stories (New And Selected) star Dustin Hoffman (Actor Tribute); longtime Todd Haynes collaborator (Wonderstruck, Carol, Far From Heaven) Edward Lachman (Cinematographer Tribute); former Vice President and An Inconvenient Truth presenter Al Gore (Humanitarian Tribute), and Jason Blum of Blumhouse Productions (Industry Tribute).

Dee Rees's Mudbound cast of Carey Mulligan, Garrett Hedlund, Jason Clarke, Jason Mitchell, Mary J Blige, Rob Morgan, and Jonathan Banks will receive a special Gotham Jury Award for their ensemble performance.

The Ifp...
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Julianne Moore to Star in Julie Taymor’s Gloria Steinem Biopic

Moore in “Still Alice

Julie Taymor’s upcoming adaptation of Gloria Steinem’s memoir has found a leading lady. “My Life on the Road” — which already seemed too good to be true — just got even better. Julianne Moore has signed on to portray the iconic feminist in the June Pictures project. Deadline broke the news.

Described as a coming-of-age story chronicling Steinem’s “growth from a reluctant spokesperson of a movement, into a galvanizing symbol for equality, with a focus on the encounters along the road that helped shape her,” the film is being penned by Tony-nominated playwright Sarah Ruhl.

“My Life on the Road” was published in 2015. Steinem’s other books include “Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions,” “Revolution from Within: A Book of Self-Esteem,” and “Doing Sixty & Seventy.” Along with Jane Fonda and Robin Morgan, Steinem co-founded the Women’s Media Center, an organization that works towards making women more visible in media. She also co-founded Ms. magazine.

“We can talk about glass ceilings, but we have to remember there was a time when there wasn’t even a door,” Moore has said. “I don’t take any of it for granted for a minute.” She emphasized that she’s “not of a generation who might have forgotten,” and explained, “for those of us who were born in the ‘60s and came of age in the ‘70s, and remember the women’s movement — I mean, my God, birth control wasn’t legal in the U.S. until 1965, I think. That’s insane! And there are girls today who don’t know that.”

Moore’s upcoming projects include “Bel Canto,” an adaptation of Ann Patchett’s novel about an opera singer who is held hostage in South America, and a re-imagining of Sebastian Lelio’s critically acclaimed 2013 drama “Gloria,” which will see her playing a lonely, free-spirited woman in her 50s. She won an Academy Award in 2015 for her portrayal of a linguistics professor diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease in “Still Alice.” She’s also earned nods for “Far from Heaven,” “The Hours,” “The End of the Affair,” and “Boogie Nights.” She took home an Emmy and Golden Globe for depicting Sarah Palin in HBO’s “Game Change.”

Julianne Moore to Star in Julie Taymor’s Gloria Steinem Biopic was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Watch: Vittorio Storaro and Ed Lachman’s 70-Minute Cinematography Master Class

The 55th New York Film Festival brought together cinematographers Vittorio Storaro (The Conformist, Apocalypse Now) and Ed Lachman (Carol, The Limey) for a master class on the occasion of both having films in the fest’s main slate. Lachman lensed Todd Haynes’ Centerpiece film Wonderstruck and Storaro did Woody Allen’s Closing Night film Wonder Wheel.

Festival director Kent Jones hosted the two at the Walter Reade Theater on October 11 for an all-encompassing talk of their cinematic philosophies and the cinematographers’ 40-year friendship.

Storaro and Lachman showed clips from films that inspire them and clips of their own work. The clips were a launching pad to discuss the difficult-to-pin cinematic language of photographic storytelling. We’ve included key quotes from their talk and the complete video of masterclass below.

Lachman on Storaro

Vittorio has done more in the last 50 years for the recognition and esteem of cinematography than anybody.

Becoming
See full article at The Film Stage »

Four Mother-Daughter Movies Could Dominate Awards Season

  • Indiewire
Four Mother-Daughter Movies Could Dominate Awards Season
Mother-daughter relationships have always been the stuff of great drama. And the Oscars are no exception. Three decades ago the “Moonstruck” acting duo Olympia Dukakis and Cher both won gold for playing a strong-willed New York Italian mother and her feisty daughter. Six years later, as a mute Scottish teacher and her de facto interpreter in New Zealand, Holly Hunter and Anna Paquin repeated that twofer triumph with Jane Campion’s “The Piano.”

Onscreen mother-daughter conflict has resulted in other dual Academy Award nominations: selfless Barbara Stanwyck tricked Anne Shirley into marrying rich in tearjerker “Stella Dallas” (1937); Meryl Streep’s big mouth inspired a rebellious Julia Roberts in “August: Osage County” (2013); Piper Laurie was literally crucified by Sissy Spacek in “Carrie” (1976). At the start of this decade, Mo’Nique won an Oscar portraying the sexually abusive parent of fellow “Precious” nominee Gabourey Sidibe. Back in 1984, both Shirley MacLaine and
See full article at Indiewire »

Movie Review – Wonderstruck (2017)

Wonderstruck, 2017.

Directed by Todd Haynes.

Starring Oakes Fegley, Millicent Simmonds, Jaden Michael, Julianne Moore, Tom Noonan, James Urbaniak, Morgan Turner, Cory Michael Smith, and Michelle Williams.

Synopsis:

The story of a young boy in the Midwest is told simultaneously with a tale about a young girl in New York from fifty years ago as they both seek the same mysterious connection.

The more I think about Wonderstruck (director Todd Haynes’ latest film, which is at once everything and nothing like previous works in his catalog), I still have no answer as to the intended demographic. It’s a family friendly movie that children really aren’t going to find much enjoyment in (a connecting secondary story is presented as a silent film that will absolutely test the patience of younger viewers), yet one undeniably impressive on a technical level visually and sonically trying to salvage a predictable narrative that will likewise bore adults.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Michael Apted to Head Camerimage Competition Jury

Michael Apted to Head Camerimage Competition Jury
British documentarian Michael Apted, who broke ground with decades-long chronicles of subjects’ lives, will chair the Camerimage fest main competition jury, the organization has announced.

Heather Stewart, creative director at the British Film Institute, and cinematographers Christian Berger (“The White Ribbon”), Stuart Dryburgh (“The Piano”), Stephen Goldblatt (“Lethal Weapon”), Karl Walter Lindenlaub (“Independence Day”) and Anastas N. Michos (“Man on the Moon”) will also serve, evaluating the best in world cinematography Nov. 11-18 in Bydgoszcz, Poland.

Director-producer Brad Silberling (“City of Angels”) will lead the Polish films competition jury, alongside cinematographers Andrew Dunn (“The Bodyguard”), Denis Lenoir (“Demonlover”), Claudio Miranda (“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”) and VFX supervisor Mark H. Weingartner (“Inception”).

Last year’s docu prize achievement winner Jay Rosenblatt (“Human Remains”) will preside over the docu features jury, serving with writer-producer-director Sheila Curran Bernard (“Slavery by Another Name”), Dp John Davey (“La danse”), producer Karen Konicek (Zipporah Films) and director-producer Kristine Samuelson (“Arthur and Lillie
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Interview, Audio: Director Todd Haynes Becomes ‘Wonderstruck’

  • HollywoodChicago.com
Chicago – Todd Haynes is an American auteur, as every one of his films bear the distinct mark of his creativity. From his beginnings with the indie masterpiece “Safe” (1995) through unforgettable films like “Far From Heaven” (2002), “I’m Not There” (2007) and “Carol,” Haynes has made cinematic art. His latest film is “Wonderstruck.”

The film is adapted from a popular young adult novel by Brian Selznick, which was combined with distinct graphic art. Haynes use the art to dreamily interpret the book, as the film is set in the 1920s and 1970s New York City. Jumping from era to era is the catch of the story, as a deaf girl (Millicent Simmonds) from the ‘20s is interconnected to a newly deaf boy (Oakes Fegley) in the 1970s. The film features Julianne Moore in a dual role, and also features Michelle Williams.

Todd Haynes at the Chicago International Film Festival in 2015

Photo credit:
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Cinematography Legends Vittorio Storaro and Ed Lachman Give a Once-in-a-Lifetime Master Class – Watch

  • Indiewire
Cinematography Legends Vittorio Storaro and Ed Lachman Give a Once-in-a-Lifetime Master Class – Watch
One of the joys of the New York Film Festival is that for 18 days the greatest international filmmakers descend on Lincoln Center not only to share their most recent films, but to engage in a conversation about their work and career.

This year, two of the greatest living cinematographers, Vittorio Storaro and Ed Lachman, had films at the fest – “Wonder Wheel” and “Wonderstruck” – and for 90-minutes shared the stage with festival director Kent Jones to discuss the craft to which they’ve dedicated their lives. IndieWire has the exclusive video of the entire “Master Class” below.

Lachman has shot a number of the seminal American films of the last the 30 years, including Sofia Coppola’s “Virgin Suicides” and Steven Soderbergh’s “The Limey,” but it’s been his 15-year collaboration with director Todd Haynes (“Carol”) that has defined his career. Storaro is best know to American audiences for having shot
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Wonderstruck’: How Costume Design Superstar Sandy Powell Boosted Todd Haynes’ Cinematic Tour de Force

  • Indiewire
‘Wonderstruck’: How Costume Design Superstar Sandy Powell Boosted Todd Haynes’ Cinematic Tour de Force
After working on “Hugo” (based on Brian Selznick’s illustrated novel, “The Invention of Hugo Cabret”), costume designer Sandy Powell became the first champion of his follow-up, “Wonderstruck.” In fact, Powell was so taken with his parallel adventures of two deaf children in 1927 and 1977 New York, that she encouraged him to write a screenplay and then gave it to Todd Haynes, who read it and agreed to direct.

“I thought it would make a wonderful movie, and, after Brian finished the script, I joked that I would have to produce it,” said the three-time Oscar-winning Powell (“The Young Victoria,” “The Aviator,” and “Shakespeare in Love”).

“I immediately thought of Todd. He’s so visual and he takes risks, and I was interested in his take on younger people driving the story,” added Powell, who previously worked with the director on “Carol,” “Far From Heaven,” and “Velvet Goldmine.”

A Tale of
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Wonderstruck’: Todd Haynes Blows Up Cinema, One Genre at a Time

‘Wonderstruck’: Todd Haynes Blows Up Cinema, One Genre at a Time
Maybe Todd Haynes has always been too smart for his own good. The 56-year-old director has been making films for nearly 40 years, but in some ways he’s still the Brown semiotics grad who can’t resist the siren’s call of form. As he admits, “I like to set up obstacles at times, because movies are ultimately about what the spectator brings to them.”

That would seem to make him an unlikely candidate to direct a young-adult adaptation, but his “Carol” and “Velvet Goldmine” costume designer Sandy Powell knew better. When she discovered Brian Selznick’s 2011 graphic novel “Wonderstruck,” which intertwines stories from 1927 and 1977 in a young-adult mystery with little dialogue, she encouraged him to adapt it for Haynes on spec.

Indeed, Haynes found the “Wonderstruck” screenplay downright Haynesian. “Brian’s script was so ornately and attentively cinematic,” he said. “Not just the movie references, but the use of
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Wonderstruck’: Todd Haynes Blows Up Cinema, One Genre at a Time

  • Indiewire
‘Wonderstruck’: Todd Haynes Blows Up Cinema, One Genre at a Time
Maybe Todd Haynes has always been too smart for his own good. The 56-year-old director has been making films for nearly 40 years, but in some ways he’s still the Brown semiotics grad who can’t resist the siren’s call of form. As he admits, “I like to set up obstacles at times, because movies are ultimately about what the spectator brings to them.”

That would seem to make him an unlikely candidate to direct a young-adult adaptation, but his “Carol” and “Velvet Goldmine” costume designer Sandy Powell knew better. When she discovered Brian Selznick’s 2011 graphic novel “Wonderstruck,” which intertwines stories from 1927 and 1977 in a young-adult mystery with little dialogue, she encouraged him to adapt it for Haynes on spec.

Indeed, Haynes found the “Wonderstruck” screenplay downright Haynesian. “Brian’s script was so ornately and attentively cinematic,” he said. “Not just the movie references, but the use of
See full article at Indiewire »

'Wonderstruck' Director Todd Haynes on Reuniting With Julianne Moore and Working With Child Actors (Exclusive)

'Wonderstruck' Director Todd Haynes on Reuniting With Julianne Moore and Working With Child Actors (Exclusive)
Todd Haynes relaxes into a couch in a suite at the Beverly Hills Four Seasons, having arrived at his final sit down at the end of a long press day for his new film, Wonderstruck, which tells the interlacing stories of two children across different time periods: In 1977, Ben (played by Pete's Dragon actor Oakes Fegley) goes on a quest through New York City to find the father he never knew, while in 1927, Rose (newcomer Millicent Simmonds), a young, deaf cinephile, likewise sets out into the city in search of silent movie star Lillian Mayhew (Julianne Moore). The movie marks the director's fourth collaboration with Moore, following 1995's Safe, 2002's Far From Heaven (which he was Oscar-nominated for Best Original Screenplay and she for Best Actress) and 2007's I'm Not There.

Considering Wonderstruck had its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival in May, followed by a run of the festival gauntlet with screenings at Telluride, BFI London and as
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

'Wonderstruck' Review: Todd Haynes Turns Kids' Book Into Eye-Popping Wonder

'Wonderstruck' Review: Todd Haynes Turns Kids' Book Into Eye-Popping Wonder
Todd Haynes creates movies that feel like part of his DNA. Whether they're originals (Safe, Velvet Goldmine, Far From Heaven, I'm Not There) or adapted from other works (Carol, the HBO miniseries Mildred Pierce), they seem to course from his bloodstream into ours. Wonderstruck, gorgeous as it is, feels like something a little less personal, a little less transgressive. Haynes has said he wanted to make a smart film for kids, and as source material, he chose a juvenile-fiction novel illustrated and written by Brian Selznick, whose work also inspired Martin Scorsese's Hugo.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

18th Woodstock Film Festival Celebrates Bill Pullman, ‘Infinity Baby’

The 2017 Woodstock Film Festival concluded Oct. 15 with awards for actor Bill Pullman and Bob Byington’s dark comedy feature “Infinity Baby.” Stylized by its founders as “fiercely independent,” the fest celebrated its 18th annual iteration in Woodstock, Rhinebeck, Kingston, Rosendale, and Saugerties, New York. Running Oct. 11–15, the event screened dozens of new titles, including Richard Linklater’s “Last Flag Flying” (Amazon Studios), Ruben Östlund’s Cannes champion “The Square,” and “Infinity Baby,” the Best Narrative Feature award winner starring Kieran Culkin, Megan Mullally, and Nick Offerman that premiered earlier this year at SXSW. The Woodstock Film Festival has in years past screened such Oscar-nominated projects as “Far From Heaven,” “The Imitation Game,” “Up in the Air,” and last year’s “Loving.” The Maverick Awards Ceremony Oct. 14, which included a tribute to the late director Jonathan Demme, honored legendary producer and manager Shep Gordon with the Trailblazer Award in recognition of his groundbreaking career.
See full article at Backstage »

Todd Haynes Reveals The Films That Inspired ‘Wonderstruck’ For TCM Marathon

  • Indiewire
Todd Haynes Reveals The Films That Inspired ‘Wonderstruck’ For TCM Marathon
With the premiere of his film “Wonderstruck” right around the corner, Todd Haynes has compiled a list of films that inspired him through the making of his film. This selection of films will be part of Turner Classic Movies’ night program this coming Thursday October 19, one day before the film hits select theaters on October 20.

Related:‘Wonderstruck’ Trailer: Todd HaynesLove Letter to Silent Cinema is a Profound Gem

Wonderstruck” conjoins the stories of two kids living in different time periods who are both dreaming of something different: a girl from New York during the 1920s and a boy from the Midwest during the 1970s. As they seek meaning in their lives, their stories will connect through time. Here is the list of films that Haynes studied when making “Wonderstruck”:

The first one is “The Crowd,” directed by King Vidor from 1928. It is a silent film that follows the
See full article at Indiewire »

Et Obsessions: David Fincher’s ‘Mindhunter,’ ‘Time and the Conways’ and More!

Et Obsessions: David Fincher’s ‘Mindhunter,’ ‘Time and the Conways’ and More!
Here at Et, we’re obsessed with a lot of things – and here’s what we’re most excited about this week:

Why We’re Obsessed With ‘Wonderstruck

Oscar-winning filmmaker Todd Haynes reunites with his Far From Heaven star, Julianne Moore, for a film that appears as wondrous as the title suggests. But after the very adult Carol, Haynes is doing something more family-friendly, about the parallel journeys of a young, deaf girl (Millicent Simmonds) who runs away from home in search of her acting idol (Moore) in 1927 and a boy (Oakes Fegley) who runs away from his Minnesota home in search of his father in 1977.

Wonderstruck is in theaters Friday, Oct. 20.

Why We’re Obsessed With ‘Mindhunter

With Mindhunter, a new series about two FBI agents researching serial killers in the early days of criminal psychology, David Fincher reimagines the cop thriller for TV. Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany play the two agents, who use their research
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Digital Cinematography Smackdown: Vittorio Storaro and Ed Lachman Debate, With Love

  • Indiewire
Digital Cinematography Smackdown: Vittorio Storaro and Ed Lachman Debate, With Love
Cinematography legends Vittorio Storaro (“Apocalypse Now,” “The Conformist”) and Ed Lachman (“Far From Heaven,” “Carol”) have been friends for 40 years. Lachman reveres Storaro’s work and leadership — but doesn’t hesitate to say he doesn’t share Storaro’s love for digital cameras.

“They can talk about 14-stop exposure range, but the color separation is different,”said Lachman. “The chemistry of R, G, B the three [color] layers — to me, it’s like an etching in the chemical process of the development. For me, there are certain films that should be photographed photographically, chemically… I can tell there’s a difference in the feeling of the film.”

The debate was part of a 90-minute conversation at the New York Film Festival October 11, moderated by festival director Kent Jones. Storaro talked about his positive transition to digital cinematography, which came largely through his collaboration with Woody Allen who directed the festival’s closing-night film,
See full article at Indiewire »

12 Movies with the Best Color Cinematography of All-Time

  • Indiewire
12 Movies with the Best Color Cinematography of All-Time
These days, major cinematographers like Emmanuel Lubezki and Ed Lachman are as much of a draw to serious moviegoers as the directors they work with. Currently, Roger Deakins’ masterful work in the visually stunning “Blade Runner 2049” has led to one recurring question above all: Will Roger finally win the Oscar? Among the more striking aspects of Deakins’ accomplishment is the use of color: Virtually every shot has a different palette.

It feels like something we’ve never seen before, but have we? How does today’s best cinematography stack up against the great color films of the past?

Since the early 20th century, there have always been experimentations with color cinematography, but it wasn’t until the late ’30s, with the massive success of “The Wizard of Oz” and “Gone with the Wind,” that color films became a staple of international cinema. With films stretching from 1947 to 2011, from masters like Jack Cardiff to Lubezki,
See full article at Indiewire »
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