The Jury (2002) - News Poster

(2002– )

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Tiff 2014: Top Ten Most Anticipated Movies at the 2014 Toronto Film Festival

The line-up at this year's Toronto Film Festival has a much different feel than year's past and coming up with a list of most anticipated films isn't nearly as easy as previous years. Not because there's any lack of possible greatness, but in fact perhaps because the possibility is even greater, though in corners we may not expect. This year's fest is without what I would call a "big" film. David Dobkin's The Judge is opening the festival but at 141 minutes and with a trailer that does very little to convince me of its quality I have a hard time expecting much from it. Reese Witherspoon's Wild from director Jean-Marc Vallee is certainly one I will be seeing, but the anticipation level isn't entirely there and the somewhat muted Telluride response of respect with caveats has lessened my anticipation ever so slightly, the same could be said for Jon Stewart's Rosewater,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Actor Paul Bhattacharjee disappears before Royal Court run

Police say 53-year-old, who has appeared in films including Casino Royale and Dirty Pretty Things, was last seen on 10 July

An actor who appeared in the James Bond film Casino Royale has gone missing, Scotland Yard has said.

Paul Bhattacharjee was said to be in a good mood when he was last seen as he left the Royal Court theatre in Sloane Square, London, at around 6.15pm on Wednesday 10 July after taking part in a rehearsal.

Scotland Yard said Bhattacharjee, who also uses the name Gautam Paul Bhattacharjee, texted his girlfriend at 9pm that night but no one has heard from him since.

The 53-year-old from Redbridge, north-east London, who acted in the films The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, White Teeth and Dirty Pretty Things, was due to appear in Talk Show, a black comedy, this week.

Police described his disappearance as "totally out of character".

A spokeswoman for the
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

James Brown Movie Moves Forward Without Spike Lee

James Brown Movie Moves Forward Without Spike Lee
In December of 2006, Spike Lee was hired to write and direct a film about the life of James Brown for producer Brian Grazer. One year later, Wesley Snipes was attached to play Brown, though the actor wouldn't cover any of the Godfather of Soul's famed songs.

"We're doing it together -- it's going to happen," Lee told MTV News in 2009. "I want to hear James Brown’s voice. That’s just my personal taste."

When Snipes got into legal trouble with the IRS, casting turned to Eddie Murphy, who as recently as this year said that Lee's script for the film was "incredible."

"That's a great, great piece," Murphy told BlackTree TV. "I wish it could come together. It has everything and his story is incredible. Imagine how incredible Ray Charles' story was -- and he's at the piano. James is doing splits and running and jump off the wall.
See full article at Huffington Post »

Bafta TV special/Julie Walters: Queen of the screen

She's won more Baftas than any other actress. Here, Julie Walters tells Euan Ferguson about her hippy years, life in the country and why it's never been a better time to be a woman on TV

Other multiple Bafta- and Emmy-winning actresses might have flung toys from the pram, or at least raised a manicured eyebrow. The restaurant at the photo studio had courteously but undeniably told her they'd run out of basically everything she might have wanted. Julie Walters smiled and forgave, and smiled again, and pretended to enjoy choosing the remaining dreadful rabbit-food option. Then, out of the waiter's sight, laughed like a drain when I suggested she'd have had better luck choosing from the other (blank) side of the menu; then turned down my offer of a cup of coffee instead because, "No, I'd talk you to death if I had a cup of coffee."

Without caffeine,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Bafta TV special/Julie Walters: Queen of the screen

She's won more Baftas than any other actress. Here, Julie Walters tells Euan Ferguson about her hippy years, life in the country and why it's never been a better time to be a woman on TV

Other multiple Bafta- and Emmy-winning actresses might have flung toys from the pram, or at least raised a manicured eyebrow. The restaurant at the photo studio had courteously but undeniably told her they'd run out of basically everything she might have wanted. Julie Walters smiled and forgave, and smiled again, and pretended to enjoy choosing the remaining dreadful rabbit-food option. Then, out of the waiter's sight, laughed like a drain when I suggested she'd have had better luck choosing from the other (blank) side of the menu; then turned down my offer of a cup of coffee instead because, "No, I'd talk you to death if I had a cup of coffee."

Without caffeine,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'The Help' Director Tate Taylor to Adapt 'The Jury' Miniseries into Film

Two Oscar nominated talents are joining forces for a promising new adaptation of the 2002 British miniseries The Jury from Peter Morgan (The Queen) and Pete Travis (Vantage Point). Tate Taylor, the actor turned writer, director and producer of the Best Picture nominated adaptation of The Help, and Beau Willimon, the scribe nominated for writing The Ides of March, my favorite film from 2011 which was sadly snubbed by the Oscars in the Best Picture, Best Director (George Clooney) and Best Actor (Ryan Gosling) categories, are behind the new adaptation set up at Fox 2000. Taylor will direct and Willimon will write. When a white teen is murdered, all fingers point to his Sikh classmate, Duvinder Singh, who reportedly hated him. During his trial, 12 widely disparate jurors must set aside their differences and prejudices to judge the racially fraught case. Deadline says the miniseries, which featured a younger Gerard Butler ...
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

'The Help' Director Tate Taylor To Helm Big Screen Redo Of Brit Miniseries 'The Jury'

Typically when your most recent film racks up a couple of Oscar nominations and an outstanding box office take, studios have their hands out practically begging you to bring your dream project to their doorsteps. Helmer Tate Taylor hasn’t exactly followed that path after his success with 2011’s “The Help,” even after the multiple awards which included Octavia Spencer’s win at the Oscars for Best Supporting Actress. Taylor has been slow to line up his next directorial effort, passing on longtime friend and actress Melissa McCarthy’s R-rated road trip comedy “Tammy,” with brief word back in August that Taylor was in early talks to direct an adaptation of the 2002 novel "Peace Like A River" for DreamWorks and Warner Brothers.

But another project has come on the horizon with Deadline reporting that Taylor is in talks to write and direct the Fox 2000 project “The Jury.” The film is
See full article at The Playlist »

Director of The Help Tate Taylor is in talks to remake UK miniseries The Jury

  • JoBlo
Tate Taylor, currently riding high in Hollywood's good graces for his Oscar-nominated adaptation of The Help, looks like he may be choosing a more contemporary tale of racial tension for his follow-up project.  Just as he wrote and directed The Help, so to is he currently hammering out a deal with Fox 2000 to write and direct a movie adaptation of the 2002 British miniseries The Jury.  Originally directed by Pete Travis (Vantage Point, Dredd) and written by Peter Morgan...
See full article at JoBlo »

Directors: Taylor, Lee, Fickman, Lin, Quale

The Jury

Tate Taylor ("The Help") is in talks to write and direct "The Jury", a remake of Peter Morgan and Pete Travis' 2002 British miniseries, for Fox 2000.

The original followed the inner workings of the trial of a young Sikh student charged with murdering a classmate tormenter. Gerard Butler and Mark Strong starred. [Source: Deadline]

Scary Movie 5

Malcolm Lee ("Roll Bounce," "Undercover Brother") is set to direct a fifth "Scary Movie" which is slated to begin filming this summer.

Casting is underway but David Zucker, who wrote and directed both the third and fourth "Scary Movie", will also be returning to co-write and produce the fifth installment alongside Lee. [Source: Bloody Disgusting]

Over My Dead Body

Andy Fickman is set to direct a remake of the hit German comedy "Over My Dead Body" for Oops Doughnuts and Wind Dancer.

The story follows a narcissistic womanizer who dies, goes to Hell and makes a
See full article at Dark Horizons »

‘The Help’ Director Tate Taylor Eyes ‘The Jury’

It was more than five months ago when we heard any news pertaining to Tate Taylor (The Help), and that merely revolved around his departure from a project. For someone who helmed a film that was a) nominated for Best Picture and b) earned one of its stars an Oscar, he’s been laying pretty low as of late.

But Deadline have come in, telling us that Taylor is now circling The Jury, a big-screen adaptation of England’s popular 2002 miniseries that starred Mark Strong and Gerard Butler. If he takes inspiration from the original series, this upcoming film will chronicle “the inner workings of the trial of a young Sikh student charged with murdering a classmate tormenter,” as well as “the lives of the jurors and what propelled them as they moved toward a verdict.”

Although Marc Forster was once set to direct a screenplay from Beau Willimon (The Ides of March
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Help Director Tate Taylor in Talks to Write and Helm The Jury

Director Tate Taylor has been taking his sweet time in choosing a follow-up to last year’s Best Picture nominee The Help, but it sounds like he’s closing in on a new project. Deadline reports that Taylor is in talks to write and direct an adaptation of the 2002 British miniseries The Jury. The story “focuses on the inner workings of the trial of a young Sikh student charged with murdering a classmate tormenter.” The original miniseries starred Gerard Butler and Mark Strong, and spent considerable time examining the lives of the jurors as they moved closer to a verdict. The project was initially developed with Marc Forster directing and Beau Willimon (The Ides of March) writing the screenplay, but that version never came to fruition. Hit the jump for more. Taylor flirted with directing the road trip comedy Tammy, written by Melissa McCarthy as a starring vehicle for the Bridesmaids actress,
See full article at Collider.com »

‘The Help’s Tate Taylor In Talks To Write And Direct ‘The Jury’ At Fox 2000

  • Deadline
‘The Help’s Tate Taylor In Talks To Write And Direct ‘The Jury’ At Fox 2000
Exclusive: Tate Taylor, who last wrote and directed the Best Picture nominee The Help, is in talks with Fox 2000 to write and direct The Jury. The film is a movie transfer of the Granada-produced 2002 British miniseries that was written by Peter Morgan and directed by Pete Travis. The mini focuses on the inner workings of the trial of a young Sikh student charged with murdering a classmate tormenter. The mini dug into the lives of the jurors and what propelled them as they moved toward a verdict. Gerard Butler and Mark Strong were part of the ensemble. The project was acquired back in 2007 in a seven-figure deal and an attachment of Marc Forster as director and The Ides of March scribe Beau Willimon to write the script. It never got off the ground, but the subject matter certainly resonates in the current climate on a number of levels. Guymon Casady
See full article at Deadline »

Rewind TV: The Jury; Rev; Life's Too Short – review

Courtroom drama took second place to characterisation in The Jury, while the little guy had the last laugh in Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant's Life's Too Short

The Jury (ITV1) | ITV Player

Rev (BBC2) | iPlayer

Life's Too Short (BBC2) | iPlayer

It was a fine week for TV titles getting back to doing exactly what they say on the tin, rather than being confections accorded unfathomable linked triplings or actionable puns ("Quick, Thick and Cheap!"; "The Unbearable Blightness of Leering"; "Clams, Hams and Thank-You-Ma'ams", though I'm sure Gino D'Acampo would winningly step up). Rev was about a Rev. The Jury was about a jury. It was a week of the most refreshingly direct titles since the quiz show Pointless.

The Jury was, over five full nights, pretty damned good. I would have hesitated years ago to even cover this, given that some souls enjoy a meal or a friend mid-evening and,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Rewind TV: The Jury; Rev; Life's Too Short – review

Courtroom drama took second place to characterisation in The Jury, while the little guy had the last laugh in Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant's Life's Too Short

The Jury (ITV1) | ITV Player

Rev (BBC2) | iPlayer

Life's Too Short (BBC2) | iPlayer

It was a fine week for TV titles getting back to doing exactly what they say on the tin, rather than being confections accorded unfathomable linked triplings or actionable puns ("Quick, Thick and Cheap!"; "The Unbearable Blightness of Leering"; "Clams, Hams and Thank-You-Ma'ams", though I'm sure Gino D'Acampo would winningly step up). Rev was about a Rev. The Jury was about a jury. It was a week of the most refreshingly direct titles since the quiz show Pointless.

The Jury was, over five full nights, pretty damned good. I would have hesitated years ago to even cover this, given that some souls enjoy a meal or a friend mid-evening and,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

'The Jury' beats 'Young Apprentice' in ratings

'The Jury' beats 'Young Apprentice' in ratings
ITV1's new drama The Jury premiered with more than 6m viewers on Monday evening, easily outperforming Young Apprentice on BBC One, according to overnight data. The Jury, a five-part drama series written by Peter Morgan following the lives of jurors on a high-profile legal case, launched with 6.22m (24.4%) from 9pm and 203k (1.1%) on +1. Meanwhile, BBC One's Young Apprentice pulled in 4m (15.7%) as Hannah Richards become the latest apprentice to be fired by Lord Alan Sugar after the flower selling task. Inside Out had 3.21m (13.4%) on BBC One from 7.30pm, and Panorama mustered 2.96m (11.5%) from 8.30pm. A Question of Sport fetched 2.56m (16.5%) from 10.45pm, while ITV1's Real Crime was seen by 1.8m (13.7%). Channel 4's Hippo: Nature's Wild Feast, featuring footage from live streaming (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

TV review: The Jury

Peter Morgan's drama tried to be exciting, but was guilty of some poor dialogue and feeble direction

It's a dramaturg's delight, the sight of a bunch of professionals storming down a corridor, preferably dressed as doctors, but barristers are fun too, because of their wigs. I always worry when I see it; if you need to convey that something is dramatic by having people walking really fast, when in reality I bet barristers maintain rather a stately pace, it's the equivalent of having to use exclamation marks to alert people to the fact that you're joking. In an ideal world, it would be dramatic on account of all the exciting things that happen; just as, ideally, people would know you were joking because it was funny.

The idea for The Jury (ITV1) has actually been disinterred from 2001, when Peter Morgan wrote the first series, which starred Helen McCrory and
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

'The Jury' Julie Walters, Peter Morgan Q&A

'The Jury' Julie Walters, Peter Morgan Q&A
Back in 2002, a writer called Peter Morgan wrote an ITV drama called The Jury, which starred some actor called Gerard Butler. Well, nine years later, Peter's decided to do it all over again! Yes, after writing movies like The Queen and Frost/Nixon, Morgan's penned a new series of The Jury, which will air every day next week. There's no Gerard Butler this time - instead, Julie Walters is playing a QC alongside a whole host of other great acting talent. Over the five episodes, not only do we get to see a controversial court case unfold, but we get to learn about those jury members. At a recent BAFTA screening of the show, Julie and Peter joined producer Lee Morris and Michael Offer to answer questions about The Jury - read on to find out what they had to say! Julie, your character in The Jury (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

'The Jury' Julie Walters, Peter Morgan Q&A

'The Jury' Julie Walters, Peter Morgan Q&A
Back in 2002, a writer called Peter Morgan wrote an ITV drama called The Jury, which starred some actor called Gerard Butler. Well, nine years later, Peter's decided to do it all over again! Yes, after writing movies like The Queen and Frost/Nixon, Morgan's penned a new series of The Jury, which will air every day next week. There's no Gerard Butler this time - instead, Julie Walters is playing a QC alongside a whole host of other great acting talent. Over the five episodes, not only do we get to see a controversial court case unfold, but we get to learn about those jury members. At a recent BAFTA screening of the show, Julie and Peter joined producer Lee Morris and Michael Offer to answer questions about The Jury - read on to find out what they had to say! Julie, your character in The Jury (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

TV highlights 07/11/2011: MasterChef: The Professionals | The Choir: Military Wives | The Jury | Covert Affairs | American Horror Story | Bored To Death

  • The Guardian - TV News
MasterChef: The Professionals | The Choir: Military Wives | The Jury | Covert Affairs | American Horror Story | Bored To Death

MasterChef: The Professionals

8.30pm, BBC2

After the undercooked ratings catastrophe that was its celebrity incarnation, MasterChef returns with something to prove. However well they might do, celebrities are scarcely likely to jack it all in and chain themselves to a mouli. The stakes are much higher in MasterChef: The Professionals, and it's a vastly better show for it. Chef Monica Galetti is back and as thoroughly humourless as ever. The ever-more likable Gregg Wallace joins her, while Michel Roux Jr waits in the wings to make a statesmanlike entrance. Ace. Ben Arnold

The Choir: Military Wives

9pm, BBC2

New series of Gareth Malone's ongoing crusade to turn unlikely agglomerations of people into competent choral ensembles. The next portion of the world he'd like to teach to sing is a group
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

British Independent Film Awards Nominations

  • LOVEFiLM
The nominations for this year’s British Independent Film Awards, due to take place on December 4 in London, were announced this afternoon at St Martin's Lane Hotel.

Shame, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy and Tyrannosaur currently lead the awards with an impressive 7 nominations each.

Following closely behind are We Need To Talk About Kevin and Kill List that received 6 nominations respectively while Submarine gained 5.

The leading men contending for Best Actor include Gary Oldman (Tinker Tailor), Michael Fassbender (Shame) and Brendan Gleeson (The Guard).

In the running for Best Actress is Rebecca Hall (The Awakening), Mia Wasikowska (Jane Eyre), MyAnna Buring (Kill List), Olivia Colman (Tyrannosaur) and Tilda Swinton (We Need To Talk About Kevin).

The Jury for this year’s awards is composed of actor David Thewlis, producer Charles Steel (The Last King of Scotland) and director Josh Appignanesi (The Infidel).

Films that missed out on nods include London Film Festival closing film,
See full article at LOVEFiLM »
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