When Tokyo Rose begins spewing her anti-American propaganda over the airwaves, Seaman Hook is inspired to fight back, using War Bonds as literal weapons against her.

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(uncredited)
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Cast

Uncredited cast:
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Tokyo Rose (voice) (uncredited)
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Japanese Announcer / Sad Sack / Singing Bond (voice) (uncredited)
Frank Graham ...
Narrator (voice) (uncredited)
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Mr. Hook (voice) (uncredited)
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Storyline

When Tokyo Rose begins spewing her anti-American propaganda over the airwaves, Seaman Hook is inspired to fight back, using War Bonds as literal weapons against her.

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Short | Animation

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Release Date:

February 1945 (USA)  »

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Did You Know?

Trivia

This cartoon (along with other "Hook" cartoons) was found by accident in the garage of a former soldier who had saved them, thinking they were "Private Snafu" shorts. The cartoon was finally discovered in the mid-1990s when an A&E documentary on war cartoons began production. It turned out that Warners made these shorts for the US Navy and because they wanted to keep this a secret, all original negatives were destroyed shortly after release. The "Hook" shorts that were given to the cartoon researchers had "vinegar syndrome" and have deteriorated, but fortunately before that happened, they transferred them to video. See more »

Connections

Featured in Toonheads: The Lost Cartoons (2000) See more »

Soundtracks

In My Merry Oldsmobile
Music by Gus Edwards
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User Reviews

 
Very shocking in the 21st century for its depiction of the Japanese, but very effective as propaganda...and funny, too.
18 May 2009 | by (Bradenton, Florida) – See all my reviews

This is one of several "Mr. Hook" cartoons made to encourage soldiers to buy war bonds. In this installment, the film begins in Tokyo, with Tokyo Rose and her evil friends broadcasting propaganda to the Allied servicemen. When the message reaches Hook's ship, he's incensed when Rose suggests that war bonds are a waste of money, so he sends a little "surprise package" her way. Then, following this, you see all the great ways that these bonds will pay off when the war has completed--nice clothes, a nice car and some spending money--everything a guy on the prowl for a "hot tomato" needs!

By today's standards, this is a very shocking film. After all, the stereotypes of the Japanese are rather racist. However, as long as the viewer actually understands why the enemy was portrayed this way and the context for the film, it's still an enjoyable film--plus it really helps to make the message clear to soldiers and sailors.

By the way, this was not intended to be seen by the general public but only by servicemen. In order to save money, unlike other Warner Brothers cartoons, this one is in black & white--a money-saving maneuver.


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