Carandiru (2003) - News Poster

(2003)

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San Sebastián: Gullane Boards Marco Bellocchio’s Mafia Thriller ‘The Traitor’ (Exclusive)

San Sebastian — Brazil’s Gullane has joined Italy’s Ibc Movie, Kavac Film and Rai Cinema, Germany’s The Match Factory Production and France’s Ad Vitam to produce Marco Bellocchio’s “The Traitor.”

Michael Weber’s The Match Factory will also handle international sales rights. Set to shoot in Italy, Brazil, the U.S. and Germany, “The Traitor” is a biopic of Tommaso Buscetta, the first high-ranking Mafia boss to turn informant on the Cosa Rostra in what Bellocchio regards as a an act of heroic betrayal.

Buscetta’s testimony led to the first big trial against organized crime and the conviction of hundreds of Mafia members.

Buschetta, who had a Brazilian wife, was living in Brazil when two of his sons and brothers were killed by the Corleonesi mob, which encourages him, when extradited to Italy, to collaborate with Italian prosecutors, becoming Cosa Nostra’s first high-ranking informer.

“The
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Brazil Choses ‘Bingo – The King of the Mornings’ as its Foreign-Language Academy Award Submission

Brazil has selected “Bingo – The King of the Mornings,” one of its most awaited debuts of 2017, as its entry for next year’s foreign-language Academy Award.

Produced by Brazilian production powerhouse Gullane, “Bingo – the King of the Mornings'” candidature also marks a victory for Warner Bros. whose Brazilian office co-produced the title, which will be distributed in Latin america by Warner Latin America.

The submission, voted on by a commission of over 200 film specialists, was announced by the Brazilian Film Academy. It appears to have avoided the polemics of last year’s choice when the publicly declared animosity of one member of the candidature jury towards Cannes competition title “Aquarius” caused three filmmakers to refuse to submit their film for consideration.

Long-anticipated, “Bingo – The King of the Mornings” was chosen from among 22 contenders. It marks the first feature as a director of Daniel Rezende, an award-winning editor on Terrence Malick’s “The Tree of Life,” José Padilha
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Globo’s Guel Arraes on ‘Jailers’ and the Brazilian TV Giant’s ‘New Age of Series’ (Exclusive)

Globo’s Guel Arraes on ‘Jailers’ and the Brazilian TV Giant’s ‘New Age of Series’ (Exclusive)
Globo’s “Jailers,” the sole Latin American series selected for next week’s MipTV Drama Screenings, is more than a gritty Brazilian penitentiary-set thriller.

At just 12 episodes, and already renewed for a second season, it forms part of Globo’s drive into new fiction formats, subjects and characters as the Brazilian TV powerhouse grapples with the same challenge as other free-to-air broadcasters: how to maintain traditional linear TV audiences while appealing to cord-cutting millennials.

Globo’s answer, like many other TV networks’, is robust diversification. It has most certainly not given up on its famous telenovelas. But it is leveraging its production expertise, studio muscle and zeal for technological innovation to create what it hopes are event novelas, similar to the event programming increasingly being touted by other free-to-air networks.

Exhibit A: “Novo Mundo,” an 186-episode telenovela set in 1817, which began airing on Globo’s main channel Wednesday. For the series, Globo
See full article at Variety - TV News »

In memoriam: the film stars and directors we lost in 2016

In memoriam: the film stars and directors we lost in 2016
We pay tribute to the film stars and directors from around the world who sadly passed away in 2016.Hector BabencoArgentine-born Brazilian director Hector Babenco died on July 13 at 70-years-old.He found international success with Brazilian slum drama Pixote (1981), going on to make Kiss Of

We pay tribute to the film stars and directors from around the world who sadly passed away in 2016.

Hector Babenco

Argentine-born Brazilian director Hector Babenco died on July 13 at 70-years-old.

He found international success with Brazilian slum drama Pixote (1981), going on to make Kiss Of The Spider Woman (1985), for which he earned a best director Oscar nominee and William Hurt earned an Oscar win for best actor.

Babenco went on to direct Meryl Streep and Jack Nicholson in Ironweed (1987) and Tom Berenger and John Lithgow in At Play In The Fields Of The Lord (1991).

After undergoing cancer treatment in the 1990s, he returned to the director’s chair for films including Brazilian prison
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Remembering Michael Cimino, Abbas Kiarostami and More Reel-Important People We Lost in July

  • Movies.com
Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies that have left us in recent weeks. Below you'll find names big and small and from all areas of the industry, though each was significant to the movies in his or her own way. Hector Babenco (1946-2016) - Brazilian Filmmaker. He was nominated for an Oscar for directing Kiss of the Spider Woman. His other movies include IronweedCarandiruAt Play in the Fields of the Lord and Pixote. He also acts in Julian Schnabel's Before Night Falls. He died of a heart attack on July 13. (THR) Chief David Bald Eagle (1919-2016) - Native American Actor. He was a technical advisor for and appears in Dances With Wolves. Earlier he was...

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Director Hector Babenco Will Be Best Remembered For Just Two Movies, But He Was a Poet of the Downtrodden

Director Hector Babenco Will Be Best Remembered For Just Two Movies, But He Was a Poet of the Downtrodden
The late Roger Ebert called the cinema “a machine that generates empathy,” and that’s as good a definition of the power of movies as you’re likely to hear. The director Hector Babenco, who died last week at 70, made a dozen films in his lifetime, and it’s fair to say that he’ll be best remembered for just two of them: “Pixote” (1981), his ripped-from-the-gutter drama of Brazilian street kids stealing and whoring and murdering to survive, and “Kiss of the Spider Woman” (1985), a tale of two accused criminals — one a macho political prisoner, the other a drag queen who doesn’t think about politics but, in a different way, is even more of a political prisoner — who fight and talk and bond after being thrown together into the same jail cell. The first film was a scalding cry of agony and ecstasy from what used to be called
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Absence,’ ‘Town,’ ‘Paradise’ Make Rio Fest Premiere Brasil Line-Up

‘Absence,’ ‘Town,’ ‘Paradise’ Make Rio Fest Premiere Brasil Line-Up
Chico Teixeira’s “Absence,” Daniel Aragao’s “I Swear I’ll Leave This Town” and Andre Ristum’s “The Other Side of Paradise” world premiere in the Rio de Janeiro Intl. Film Festival’s centerpiece Premiere Brasil.

The Rio Fest runs Sept. 24 to Oct. 8.

“Absence,” “Town” and “Paradise” all figure in the feature film section. Also competing for Rio Fest’s top Redentor fiction feature prize: “Obra,” from Gregorio Graziosi, which bows at Toronto Discovery section.

Both “Town” and “Obra” are early sales titles on FiGa/Br, the new Brazilian sales label set up this year by L.A.-based FiGa Films.

Of other titles, Visit Films sells Fellipe Barbosa’s “Casa Grande,” also in the fiction feature cut. Playing out of competition: Pablo Fendrik’s Bac Films-sold “El Ardor,” an Amazon Western, first seen at Cannes, staring Gael Garcia Bernal and Alice Braga.

The world’s biggest new Brazilian pic spread,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Brazilian Filmmakers Find New Audiences At Home, Abroad

Brazilian Filmmakers Find New Audiences At Home, Abroad
From the point of view of world sports, Brazil is about to have its blazing moment in the sun. Will this period of high visibility also extend to other sectors of its culture?

Andre Sturm, prexy of film promotion agency Cinema do Brasil, thinks it will. “As Brazil hosts the soccer World Cup next year and the Olympic Games in three years, there’s also tremendous interest in Brazilian cinema,” he says.

Even without the boost from sports, Brazil’s film market has exploded since 2008, with 10% more screens at 2,517; 64% more admissions at 146.4 million; 108% higher box office take at $808 million; and 260% more pay TV subscribers at 16.2 million.

Brazilian cinema has the highest domestic box office share of any Latin American country — 13% on average since 2001, with 18% forecast in 2013 and producers targeting 25% to 30% in two years.

The booming Latin American pay TV business is also opening new revenue streams and, in the wake of a 2012 TV Law,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cs Video Interview: Rodrigo Santoro on Heleno

Brazilian actor Rodrigo Santoro worked for nearly a decade in his native country before some of his movies started making their way here, most notably Walter Salles' Behind the Sun and the prison drama Carandiru , but it was his role as Xerxes in Zack Snyder's 300 that really got him attention in North America, followed by a short stint on the hit ABC drama "Lost." In his new movie Heleno , Santoro plays Heleno de Freitas, one of Brazil's most famous soccer players during the '40s and '50s whose womanizing and clubbing ways led to his downfall years later, as his dreams were crushed and he ended up dying of syphilis. It's a really groundbreaking performance by Santoro, playing Heleno on the field, in the bedroom with the various women he slept with and then going...
See full article at Comingsoon.net »

Be It Trans, Gay Or J Lo's Bf, Rodrigo Santoro Is No Ordinary Heartthrob

Rodrigo Santoro at the What To Expect When You're Expecting UK premiere

It would be easy to sum up sexy Rodrigo Santoro as yet another actor with a pretty face and great body but in the eclectic career the Brazilian/Italian actor has been building with various movie roles over the past few years, Santoro is proving to be the kind of the actor that offers up much more than a cinema heartthrob.

Looking back at his past projects, he played Laura Linney’s spectacled love interest in Love, Actually, a transsexual in Hector Babenco’s 2003 film, Carandiru, a castaway on the hit series Lost, bared his stellar physique for the role of Xerxes in the 2007 film, 300,and is currently making audiences swoon in the rom-com What To Expect When You’re Expecting.

While What To Expect has him paired with Jennifer Lopez as a couple preparing for their lives
See full article at The Backlot »

Why Brazil's favela films remain flavour of the noughties

In the second of our global cinema series, Phil Hoad looks at how Brazilian films such as José Padilha's Elite Squad series sold gritty social commentary to Hollywood

When Elite Squad (Tropa de Elite), José Padilha's film about Rio de Janeiro's infamous military-police unit, Bope, was released in 2007 the director found himself under siege. Many critics found its full-frontal assault on the issue of favela violence – baldly narrated by the trigger-happy Captain Nascimento (Wagner Moura) – too much to take. Variety dubbed it "a one-note celebration of violence-for-good", while Brazilian film critic Marcelo Janot said: "It's really dangerous when a film suggests that the fascist Bope methods are the only solution to 'clean' a city."

They'd probably take the dim view of Padilha's decision to make a sequel, with Nascimento, the Brazilian Dirty Harry, picking up where he left off: crouched behind a car under a storm of gunfire.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Tiff Trailers: El Pasado (The Past)

  • Among the titles that Ioncinema.com will be covering at Tiff and therefore look forward to getting familiarized a little beforehand is Hector BabencoHector Babenco
[/link]'s The Past (O Pasado). A couple of years after Carandiru, I'm glad to see the Brazilian filmmaker (born in Argentina) back in form after a serious cancer-related illness that took him off the map for a couple of years. Based on a novel by the Argentine writer Alan Pauls, The Past is about a couple who decide to separate after 12 years; while the man (played by Gael García Bernal) tries to leave his past behind, his former partner is unable to let go. Click on the poster image below to access the trailer. ...
See full article at ioncinema »

Foreign affair: Oscar voters' 55 choices

A record-breaking 55 countries -- one more than last year -- have submitted films to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for consideration in the foreign language film category for the 76th annual Academy Awards. A number of the films that have been entered into the Oscar race have already begun to earn a profile on the festival circuit. The Danish entry, Reconstruction, directed by Christoffer Boe, was awarded the Camera d'Or as best first film at this year's Festival de Cannes. Palm Pictures is distributing it domestically. Good Bye, Lenin!, from Germany and director Wolfgang Becker, recently picked up eight awards at the German Film Awards. Several of the entries screened at Cannes this year -- among them Hector Babenco's prison drama, Carandiru, from Brazil and Sony Pictures Classics; the Canadian entry, Denys Arcand's The Barbarian Invasions, which Miramax plans to distribute domestically; and the Afghanistan entry, Osama, directed by Siddiq Barmak, whose distribution rights were picked up by United Artists.

Cannes Competition toasts French films

Cannes Competition toasts French films
The festival's official poster may be in Italian this year, but it is France that gets pride of place in the official lineup for the 56th Festival de Cannes, with French films capturing one-quarter of the Competition titles that were unveiled here Wednesday. With the U.S. studios not proffering many movies for selection, Hollywood is represented In Competition by three pictures: Clint Eastwood's Mystic River, a Warner Bros. Pictures/Village Roadshow drama starring Sean Penn, Laurence Fishburne, Tim Robbins and Kevin Bacon; Vincent Gallo's The Brown Bunny, starring Gallo and Chloe Sevigny; and Gus Van Sant's Elephant, shot with an amateur cast for HBO Films. Festival president Gilles Jacob refuted any suggestion that U.S. filmmakers had boycotted Cannes as a reprisal for France's antiwar stance on Iraq. "Absolutely not," he said. "It's been a difficult year," Cannes artistic director Thierry Fremaux admitted. As a result, the lineup contains little to set the pulse racing, featuring as it does many directors who have appeared In Competition before. These include Eastwood; Brazil's Hector Babenco, back with his tale of the notorious prison Carandiru, produced by Sony Pictures Classics; Italy's Pupi Avati, who's returning with Il Cuore Altrove (The Heart Is Elsewhere); and Canadian Denys Arcand, with The Barbarian Invasions.

French films take a quarter of Cannes Competition spots

French films take a quarter of Cannes Competition spots
PARIS -- Despite a poster in Italian, it is France that gets pride of place in the official line-up for the 56th Festival de Cannes, with one quarter of the Competition titles unveiled here Wednesday. With the U.S. studios not proffering many movies for selection, Hollywood is represented in Competition by three pictures: Clint Eastwood's Mystic River, starring Sean Penn, Laurence Fishburne, Tim Robbins and Kevin Bacon; Vincent Gallo's The Brown Bunny, starring Gallo and Chloe Sevigny; and Gus Van Sant's Elephant, shot with an amateur cast. Festival president Gilles Jacob refuted any suggestion that U.S. filmmakers had boycotted Cannes as a reprisal for France's anti-war stance on Iraq. "Absolutely not," he said. "It's been a difficult year," admitted Cannes's artistic director Thierry Fremaux. As a result, the line-up contains little to set the pulse racing, featuring as it does many directors who have appeared in Competition before. These include Eastwood, Brazil's Hector Babenco, back with his tale of the notorious prison Carandiru, Italy's Pupi Avati who's returning with Il Cuore Altrove (The Heart Is Elsewhere), and Canadian Denys Arcand with The Barbarian Invasions.

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