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Dumb's the Word (1937)

Edgar discovers a cache of gold coins in his attic but is intimidated by hose painter Billy Franey into sharing his illegal stash.

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Writers:

(story) (as Charles Roberts), (story)
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Cast

Cast overview:
...
...
Vivien Kennedy
...
Eddie Dunn ...
Jones, Neighbor
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Storyline

Vivian leaves to go shopping while Edgar is trying to tend his flower garden and cope with obnoxious house painter Billy Franey. While rummaging through the attic, Kennedy stumbles on a long-hidden stash of gold coins, which Franey informs him are now illegal to own. Edgar is bullied into agreeing to share them with Franey in order to buy his silence but must bury them in order to legally take possession of what would be buried treasure, not illegally hoarded coins. After burying them in his flower garden, he finds that unneighborly neighbor Mr. Jones has had his property resurveyed and a fence erected... with Edgar's gold on the wrong side. Franey comes up with a hairbrained plan to recover the treasure from the fractious Jones... which includes tunneling and explosives. Written by duke1029@aol.com

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Short | Comedy

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Details

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Release Date:

11 June 1937 (USA)  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

(RCA Victor System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Quotes

Edgar Kennedy: Say, are you sure you're hiding this dirt where Jones can't see it?
Painter: Listen, pal, I've been hidin' dirt all my life, and where I'm hidin' it even a worm couldn't see it. Could you?
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Connections

Remade as Dig That Gold (1948) See more »

Soundtracks

Chopsticks
(uncredited)
Composed by Euphemia Allen (a.k.a. Arhur de Lulli) (1877)
Under opening credits and whistled by Billy Franey
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