Country singing star Jimmie Rodgers sings three songs in this short: "Waiting for a Train", "Daddy and Home", and "T for Texas", all his own compositions.
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Cast

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The Singing Brakeman
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Storyline

Country singing star Jimmie Rodgers sings three songs in this short: "Waiting for a Train", "Daddy and Home", and "T for Texas", all his own compositions.

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Genres:

Short | Musical

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Release Date:

31 December 1929 (USA)  »

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(Western Electric System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This was the only screen appearance by Jimmie Rodgers. See more »

Goofs

Jimmie Rogers is supposed to be a railroad brakeman, wearing his work shirt, overalls, a bandanna, and a railroad hat. But when he crosses his leg, he is clearly wearing dress shoes and silk socks. See more »

Connections

Featured in The Beatles Anthology: July '40 to March '63 (1995) See more »

Soundtracks

T for Texas
Written and Performed by Jimmie Rodgers
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User Reviews

Gonna Drink Muddy Water
7 November 2009 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

Jimmy Rodgers, the father of Country Music and arguably the first Caucasian American to make the Blues acceptable, sings "Waiting for A Train", "Daddy and Home" and his landmark "Blue Yodel" in this one-reel short for Columbia. He comes onto an obvious stage dressed as a railroad lineman -- except for his white dress socks -- and serenades the two woman who look to be running a railroad restaurant.

The short is poorly staged and the print I saw on Youtube is in awful shape, including poor sound recording, but this is a terribly important movie. Rodgers died four years later of tuberculosis and his work went underground for fifteen years, until it reappeared in the early 1950s as Rockabilly and Country/Western Music. Any fan of either branch of music should make an effort to see this.


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