Country singing star Jimmie Rodgers sings three songs in this short: "Waiting for a Train", "Daddy and Home", and "T for Texas", all his own compositions.
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Cast

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Jimmie Rodgers ...
The Singing Brakeman
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Country singing star Jimmie Rodgers sings three songs in this short: "Waiting for a Train", "Daddy and Home", and "T for Texas", all his own compositions.

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Short | Musical

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31 December 1929 (USA)  »

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1.20 : 1
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Trivia

There were two versions of the film released, slightly different from each other - and both are in circulation. The 1929 release credits Jasper Ewing Brady as director, the 1930 version seen on the DVD credits Basil Smith. They're not the same man. The story behind that credit switch needs to be uncovered. See more »

Goofs

Jimmie Rogers is supposed to be a railroad brakeman, wearing his work shirt, overalls, a bandanna, and a railroad hat. But when he crosses his leg, he is clearly wearing dress shoes and silk socks. See more »

Connections

Edited into The Beatles Anthology: July '40 to March '63 (1995) See more »

Soundtracks

Daddy and Home
Written and Performed by Jimmie Rodgers
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User Reviews

Gonna Drink Muddy Water
7 November 2009 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

Jimmy Rodgers, the father of Country Music and arguably the first Caucasian American to make the Blues acceptable, sings "Waiting for A Train", "Daddy and Home" and his landmark "Blue Yodel" in this one-reel short for Columbia. He comes onto an obvious stage dressed as a railroad lineman -- except for his white dress socks -- and serenades the two woman who look to be running a railroad restaurant.

The short is poorly staged and the print I saw on Youtube is in awful shape, including poor sound recording, but this is a terribly important movie. Rodgers died four years later of tuberculosis and his work went underground for fifteen years, until it reappeared in the early 1950s as Rockabilly and Country/Western Music. Any fan of either branch of music should make an effort to see this.


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