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Ransomed; or, A Prisoner of War (1910)

Making his departure from home. Captain Jack of the Confederate army, leaves to rejoin his regiment, but before doing so promises his boy that he will return to celebrate the little ... See full summary »
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Cast

Cast overview:
Leo Delaney ...
Captain Jack
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Captain Jack's Wife
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Little Ned - Captain Jack's Son
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Storyline

Making his departure from home. Captain Jack of the Confederate army, leaves to rejoin his regiment, but before doing so promises his boy that he will return to celebrate the little fellow's fifth birthday. One month later the Captain gets a leave of absence for three days and goes back to keep faith with his son. The house is watched by Union soldiers, and to enter it without being detected seems impossible. The birthday promise must be kept with little Ned, and after some reconnoitering the father succeeds in getting to his family with a few presents which he has purchased to make the boy happy and keep up the spirit of the occasion. The furlough is ended and the Captain must go back to the ranks. The question of getting safely through the Union lines is a puzzling one and the attempt to do so was arrested by the "Yankees," who make the Captain a prisoner of war. Word must be sent to his wife; it is accomplished through the kindness of a guard, who allows him to write a letter which... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Drama

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Release Date:

4 October 1910 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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The attraction of this picture is its human side
12 September 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A war story that is different. Of course the word war conveys the impression of wholesale murder, and all that goes with it, but in this picture a different thing is shown. A father who went through the lines to celebrate his little boy's birthday is captured. When the little chap learns of it he goes to the general, explains the situation and offers his woolly lamb as a ransom. The general accepts the lamb and releases the father. Then the war closes and the general sends the little boy a rocking horse in place of the lamb, which he keeps as the most interesting memento of the war. The attraction of this picture is its human side. It is shown first in the father keeping faith with his little boy. Next it is shown in the general releasing the father upon the little one's plea and his keeping the lamb. The child's part is played with fidelity to childish characteristics. There is that "elusive quality" about the play which raises it above the common run of war pictures and puts it on a plane entirely by itself. It is a graphic representation of one of the effects of war without the representation of the waving banners or the blare of trumpets and rattle of drums. It will help in acquiring the correct view of war, the view which shows what it cost the folks at home. The producers are to be commended and the actors, too, deserve praise for the excellence of their performance. - The Moving Picture World, October 15, 1910


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