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"Taken" (2002) More at IMDbPro »


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

12 items from 2017


New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup

23 August 2017 1:06 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

The 55th New York Film Festival will debut a starry roster of documentaries featuring giants of the art and literary worlds as well as Alex Gibney’s postponed “No Stone Unturned,” a critical investigation into the 1994 Loughinisland massacre in Ireland, which was pulled from Tribeca in April.

Other new works include films from directors Abel Ferrara, Sara Driver, Nancy Buirski, Mathieu Amalric, and Barbet Schroeder; Vanessa Redgrave’s directorial debut “Sea Sorrow,” which played at Cannes; and films featuring Joan Didion, Arthur Miller, Gay Talese, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Jane Goodall, plus stories about racism, American immigration, and the global refugee crisis.

Three documentaries spotlight acclaimed writers, including the world premiere of Griffin Dunne’s “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold,” returning Nyff filmmaker Rebecca Miller’s tender portrait of her father, “Arthur Miller: Writer,” and the World Premiere of Myles Kane and Josh Koury’s “Voyeur,” tracking journalist Gay Talese »

- Anne Thompson

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Princess Olympia of Greece Celebrates Her Epic 21st Birthday in Her ‘Birthday Suit’

27 July 2017 10:57 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Princess Olympia of Greece turned 21 earlier this week, but the celebrations are far from over.

The princess, who turned 21 on July 25, has been ringing in the milestone with a few parties this summer. Earlier this month, she and her father Pavlos, Crown Prince of Greece, who turned 50 on May 20, shared a joint party dubbed “5021 Revolution,” in honor of the ages of the royal father and daughter.

And it looks like the partying princess is still in the birthday mood.

On Wednesday, the royal took to Instagram, posting a picture of herself in a vintage-inspired red bikini with white buttons behind a “21” birthday balloon. »

- Yvonne Juris

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Zygote: Director Neill Blomkamp On Making Short Films And The Purpose of Oats Studios

14 July 2017 8:02 AM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

Director Neill Blomkamp is going to push the edge on storytelling with amazing visual effects with his experimental short films.

With his Vancouver-based Oats Studios in its infancy stage, the studio has launched a series of initial short films to let the online audience give feedback and critique the company’s work. Online audiences can provide feedback through YouTube, Steam and even on Twitter. It will help Blomkamp and Oats Studios to determine the production of future filmmaking.

Zygote has been released this week which stars Dakota Fanning (War of the Worlds) and Jose Pablo Cantillo (Taken). The short film follows two survivors at an arctic mining station trying to survive against this alien/zombie-like creature made from the human limbs. The feel of the short film is like a cross between The Thing and Alien.

It follows previously short films that were released earlier this summer with Rakka, Firebase, »

- Gig Patta

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Family of Fore (er, Four)! Paulina Gretzky and Dustin Johnson Welcome Son River Jones - See the Sweet Snap

14 June 2017 1:40 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

It’s another boy for Paulina Gretzky and Dustin Johnson!

The model and singer (who is the oldest child of famed hockey star Wayne Gretzky) and pro golfer’s second son, River Jones Johnson, was born on Monday, June 12, at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, a source confirms to People.

The new mom of two took to Instagram to share a sweet snap of 2-year-old big brother Tatum planting a smooch on his sibling’s head.

“Welcome to the world baby boy … we all love you so much,” Gretzky captioned the family photo.

Johnson — currently the world No. 1 — also took to Instagram, »

- Jen Juneau

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Juliette Binoche Keeps Risking It All: The Guiding Principles That Lead Her From Hollywood to ‘Slack Bay’

25 April 2017 7:54 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

What brings one of the most acclaimed French actresses in the world to a Hollywood blockbuster? It’s a question that’s hard to avoid when thinking about Juliette Binoche. The Oscar winner has been a muse for Olivier Assayas, Abbas Kiarostami and Michael Haneke. She’s worked with Jean-Luc Godard, Leos Carax and Krzysztof Kieślowski. And yet, rather strangely, she has popped up in American tentpoles like “Godzilla” and “Ghost in the Shell” in recent years.

Read More: Review: Bruno Dumont’s ‘Slack Bay’ is a Middle Finger to French Society

If you think Hollywood money is the draw, then you simply don’t know Binoche. The actress could’ve gone blockbuster 24 years ago when Steven Spielberg pursued her for “Jurassic Park.” She turned him down to work with Kieślowski on “Three Colours: Blue.” Spielberg would cast Laura Dern. Binoche would win the César Award for Best Actress. Denying »

- Zack Sharf

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Review: Mars

24 April 2017 11:25 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

When some of the smartest people alive today insist we need to begin colonizing other worlds, you tend to believe them. When science fiction fans hear those words, we begin to salivate at the possibilities.

National Geographic cannily appeals to both audiences with their hybrid miniseries Mars, which mixes today’s science with tomorrow’s fiction by positing what the actual colonization of the planet, a mere 140 million miles away, might look like. Yeah, we got a glimpse of that in the adaptation of Andrew Weir’s The Martian, but this goes further and shows more of the risks involved.

The miniseries, out now from 20th Century Home Entertainment, is a captivating piece of work if unevenly assembled. You get all the usual suspects weighing in why and how we might get there including Space X guru Elon Musk and the ubiquitous Neil deGrasse Tyson. Accompanied by a Greek chorus of Nasa scientists and engineers, »

- Robert Greenberger

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Review: Mars

24 April 2017 11:25 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

When some of the smartest people alive today insist we need to begin colonizing other worlds, you tend to believe them. When science fiction fans hear those words, we begin to salivate at the possibilities.

National Geographic cannily appeals to both audiences with their hybrid miniseries Mars, which mixes today’s science with tomorrow’s fiction by positing what the actual colonization of the planet, a mere 140 million miles away, might look like. Yeah, we got a glimpse of that in the adaptation of Andrew Weir’s The Martian, but this goes further and shows more of the risks involved.

The miniseries, out now from 20th Century Home Entertainment, is a captivating piece of work if unevenly assembled. You get all the usual suspects weighing in why and how we might get there including Space X guru Elon Musk and the ubiquitous Neil deGrasse Tyson. Accompanied by a Greek chorus of Nasa scientists and engineers, »

- Robert Greenberger

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‘Signs’ and ‘Arrival’: A Philosophical Comparison

4 April 2017 2:36 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

What the two alien invasion films tell us about existential questions.

Ever since H.G. Wells released “The War of the Worlds” in 1898, the alien invasion genre has become a vehicle for humanity’s fears, questions, and aspirations. Although at the time that novel was thought to be a metaphor for the superstitions of the Victorian age, the story proved universal enough to apply to any era; from anxieties about Nazism when Orson Welles read it as a radio play in 1938, to Cold War nightmares when Byron Haskin adapted it into a film 1953, to worries about the War on Terror when Steven Spielberg did the same in 2005. But beyond merely reflecting the terrestrial fears of any particular time, the genre also addresses more universal questions — about life, death, and humanity’s place in the cosmos. Two of this century’s best alien invasion films — M. Night Shyamalan’s Signs and Denis Villeneuve’s Arrival — take precisely this existential »

- Jake Orthwein

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New to Streaming: ‘Right Now, Wrong Then,’ ‘The Life Aquatic,’ ‘The Discovery,’ and More

31 March 2017 6:53 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Blackcoat’s Daughter (Osgood Perkins)

Osgood Perkins’ debut feature, The Blackcoat’s Daughter – originally known as February at its premiere at Tiff last year – is a stylish exercise in dread, teasing out its slow-drip horrors with precision, and building a deliriously evil presence that hovers along the fringes. However, there’s a thin line between mystery and vagueness in storytelling, and it becomes difficult to decide where a »

- The Film Stage

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‘Chronicle’s’ Alex Russell to Star in Sci-Fi Thriller ‘Attach’

3 February 2017 10:44 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Chronicle” star Alex Russell has come on board the sci-fi thriller “Attach” with Chris Gorak directing from his own script.

Adam Schroeder, whose producing credits include “Chronicle” and “Sleepy Hollow,” will produce under his Adam Schroeder Entertainment banner alongside Rob Paris (“The Blackcoat’s Daughter”) of Paris Film. Highland Film Group will handle international sales, and introduce to buyers next week at the Berlin Film Festival. UTA Independent will rep the U.S. rights.

Russell will portray a star athlete who undergoes an experimental surgery that permanently attaches a cutting-edge bionic arm and leg to his body after he loses his own in a car accident. But when he realizes the advanced intelligent prosthetics may have a destructive mind of their own, he begins a desperate fight to save himself and everyone around him.

“We’re going to explore the most current and innovative science and technology in this film, »

- Dave McNary

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Dakota Fanning Joins Cast of TNT's Gilded Age Thriller The Alienist

14 January 2017 12:20 PM, PST | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Dakota Fanning is growing up… and going back to the Gilded Age to solve some of New York City’s most brutal murders.

The former child actor has joined the cast of TNT’s upcoming period thriller The Alienist, the network announced Saturday at the Television Critics Association winter press tour. Based on Caleb Carr’s bestselling book series, The Alienist centers on three investigators working together to solve a series of murders in 1896 New York. Fanning will play Sara Howard, a young NYPD secretary who’s determined to become the department’s first female detective.

RelatedTNT Orders The Alienist Adaptation, »

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Blindspot Season 2 Episode 11 Review: Droll Autumn, Unmutual Lord

11 January 2017 9:59 PM, PST | TVfanatic | See recent TVfanatic news »

Maybe it's because we're only two episodes back but Blindspot Season 2 Episode 11 feels more like it's taking accounting for another episode than a full episode itself.

"Droll Autumn, Unmutual Lord" is a slow starter that doesn't pick up until its second half and seems like its primary function is to make Jane and Weller reassess their families. Or to make us hate basketball.

The core concept of forcing the FBI to work with the CIA was played out before, and better, in Blindspot Season 1. Not to take anything away from Chad Donella, who plays Keaton, but he'll forever be Jacob Clarke from the miniseries, Taken.

Even when he's trying to be bad it's peanuts compared to what Michael Gaston did as Tom Carter.

Keaton's an annoyance; Carter was someone you full-on loathed. So asking Jane and company to work with Keaton's CIA is more of an irritation than particularly tense, »

- Brittany Frederick

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

12 items from 2017


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