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Exclusive: Kate Dennis to come home to direct Hoodlum crime drama

Kate Dennis..

Kate Dennis, one of the large band of Australian directors who have been forging successful careers in the Us, is coming home to direct Harrow, Hoodlum Entertainment.s 10-part crime drama.

Hoodlum.s Los Angeles-based CEO Tracey Robertson will produce the series commissioned by the ABC and the international distributor, Disney.s ABC Studios International, with Hoodlum co-founder Nathan Mayfield and Leigh McGrath.

Co-created by writer Stephen M. Irwin (Australia Day, Wake in Fright, Secrets & Lies) and. McGrath (Australia Day, Secrets & Lies, Strange Calls), the drama centers on a brilliant forensic pathologist who solves cases while harbouring a dark secret. The lead is yet to be announced. Shooting is due to start in Brisbane on August 7, supported by Screen Queensland.

Dennis moved to L.A. in 2014 to direct Hoodlum.s Us remake of Secrets and Lies for the ABC network, followed by episodes of CSI: Cyber for CBS and AMC.s Turn.
See full article at IF.com.au »

Liz Doran preps Matchbox series, feature 'Bondi Beach Breakfast Club'

Liz Doran.

Screenwriter Liz Doran has written for The Secret Life of Us, McLeod.s Daughters, Miss Fisher.s Murder Mysteries, Dance Academy and Please Like Me.

She speaks to Jackie Keast about Gender Matters and upcoming projects..

How did you get your start as a writer?

Well, I did it the classic long way of making sure I was an expert before I put myself forward (laughs). I left school in the early 90s and actually trained as a film editor, but I always only ever wanted to be a writer. After I finished film school I did the usual thing: I applied for a lot of development [funding] for early drafts and I tried to get Screen Nsw funding for things. I was quite lucky; there was a funding round through the F.T.O., the precursor to Screen Nsw, and they funded development on a series of 50-minute scripts.
See full article at IF.com.au »

‘The Monaro’: Filmmaker Cate Shortland Returns to TV With Historical True Crime Miniseries

‘The Monaro’: Filmmaker Cate Shortland Returns to TV With Historical True Crime Miniseries
Cate Shortland has left the German settings of “The Berlin Syndrome” behind for a project set in her homeland.

The award-winning Australian filmmaker behind “Somersault” (starring Abbie Cornish) and the German wartime drama “Lore” will be trying her hand at a true crime limited series, reports If.com. The eight-part series, titled “The Monaro,” is a project that Shortland has been mulling over since her days at the Australian Film, Television and Radio School.

Read More: ‘Berlin Syndrome’ Trailer: Teresa Palmer Becomes Her Lover’s Prisoner in Cate Shortland’s Sundance Thriller

The series is set in the 1830s in the Monaro region of New South Wales, Australia, east of the Snowy Mountains — which is also where the filmmaker shot “Somersault.” That’s all that we know about the plot at the moment.

Shortland has her work cut out for her. “I’m working with this great team of people,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘The Monaro’: Filmmaker Cate Shortland Returns to TV With Historical True Crime Miniseries

‘The Monaro’: Filmmaker Cate Shortland Returns to TV With Historical True Crime Miniseries
Cate Shortland has left the German settings of “The Berlin Syndrome” behind for a project set in her homeland.

The award-winning Australian filmmaker behind “Somersault” (starring Abbie Cornish) and the German wartime drama “Lore” will be trying her hand at a true crime limited series, reports If.com. The eight-part series, titled “The Monaro,” is a project that Shortland has been mulling over since her days at the Australian Film, Television and Radio School.

Read More: ‘Berlin Syndrome’ Trailer: Teresa Palmer Becomes Her Lover’s Prisoner in Cate Shortland’s Sundance Thriller

The series is set in the 1830s in the Monaro region of New South Wales, Australia, east of the Snowy Mountains — which is also where the filmmaker shot “Somersault.” That’s all that we know about the plot at the moment.

Shortland has her work cut out for her. “I’m working with this great team of people,
See full article at Indiewire »

“Somersault” Director Cate Shortland Has a Miniseries in the Works

Cate Shortland: sydfilmfest/ YouTube

Australian filmmaker Cate Shortland is returning to the small screen. The “Somersault” and “Lore” director is working on an eight-part miniseries for Matchbox Pictures, The Playlist reports. Her previous TV credits include episodes of “The Secret Life of Us,” “Bad Cop, Bad Cop,” and the TV movie “The Silence.” Now she’ll take on “The Monaro.”

Set in the 1830s and based on a true crime case, the miniseries will center on six women. Shortland will shoot in Monaro, a region in the south of New South Wales, Australia that served as the location for 2004’s “Somersault,” her debut feature. “It’s one of my favorite places in the world to shoot so I wanted to do something again there,” she told If. The idea for the miniseries has been gestating for quite some time: Shortland first conceived the story in film school. The project is expected to begin filming this winter in Australia, or summer in the U.S.

Shortland is working on the script for “The Monaro” with a team of writers.

Berlin Syndrome,” Shortland’s latest film, made its world premiere at Sundance this year. The thriller stars Teresa Palmer (“Lights Out”) as an Australian photojournalist traveling in Berlin. Her intense romance with a local man (Max Riemelt, “Sense8”) turns into a nightmare when she realizes that he’s holding her captive. The film will open in theaters and stream on Netflix sometime this year.

When we asked Shortland her advice for other women directors, she said, “I think that what was the best thing for me was that I never considered myself different. I just worked in the same way and I fought for my films. I didn’t have to fight to be a female filmmaker; I just had to fight to make my films,” she explained. “But I think I come from a country where I’m very fortunate. I don’t think if you are from the Middle East or some parts of Europe, maybe even North America, you have that same opportunity. I think also working with other women helps. When women get together and support each other that really helps because that has been the history of our industry in Australia.”

Australia recently unveiled two new initiatives to support female filmmakers: Screen Australia introduced Doco180 for documentary filmmakers, and the National Film Board is pushing for more women in creatives roles in film.

Somersault” Director Cate Shortland Has a Miniseries in the Works was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Cate Shortland To Direct 8-Part TV Miniseries ‘The Monaro’

While Cate Shortland came on our radar with 2004’s “Somersault,” she had a healthy TV career prior to that, helming episodes of “The Secret Life Of Us” and “Bad Cop, Bad Cop.” And between “Somersault” and her 2012’s feature “Lore,” she helmed the TV movie “The Silence.” Now, she’s set to embark on her biggest small screen effort yet.

Continue reading Cate Shortland To Direct 8-Part TV Miniseries ‘The Monaro’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Cate Shortland preps eight-parter 'The Monaro', set in 1830s, for Matchbox

Cate Shortland on the set of 'Berlin Syndrome'.

Berlin Syndrome filmmaker Cate Shortland is prepping an eight-part series for Matchbox Pictures.

Titled The Monaro, the series will focus on six women in the 1830s and is based on a true crime case, the director told If.

Shortland will shoot in the titular region, east of the Snowy Mountains, where she also shot her debut feature, Somersault.

.It.s one of my favourite places in the world to shoot so I wanted to do something again there,. the helmer said..

Shortland is an experienced writer for TV, having written episodes of The Slap, Devil.s Playground, Deadline Gallipoli and The Kettering Incident, but this will mark the first series she has directed since The Secret Life of Us in 2003.

She also helmed TV movie The Silence, starring Richard Roxburgh and co-written by Picnic at Hanging Rock.s Alice Addison,
See full article at IF.com.au »

Film Victoria unveils Screen Leader Award winners

Alison Nisselle, Greg Mclean, Ian Anderson, Deb Cox and Fiona Eagger.

Greg Mclean and Alison Nisselle are among the five industry leaders honoured by Film Victoria at last night.s Screen Leader Awards.

The Screen Leader Awards were established by Film Victoria in 2012 to recognise screen professionals who.ve shown leadership through their achievements and a commitment to further developing the industry.

This year saw the addition of two new categories to recognise writing and directing.

The inaugural Fred Schepisi Award was presented to Mclean, acknowledging his achievements in directing from his 2005 debut feature Wolf Creek through to his most recent film The Belko Experiment, which screened at the 2016 Toronto International Film Festival.

Nisselle, whose credits include television dramas Phoenix, Janus, Bed of Roses and the feature film Healing, received the Jan Sardi Award for her significant achievement as a screenwriter.

Deb Cox and Fiona Eagger, the duo behind Miss
See full article at IF.com.au »

Screen bites: did Offspring need to come back for a sixth season?

Guardian Australia’s new series of bite-sized TV commentaries will shine a light on telly talking points. In the first, we take on Offspring: the show that almost didn’t return

When Offspring first hit screens back in 2010, it gave us something we hadn’t had before: the realism of Australian dramas like The Secret Life of Us and Love My Way, but with a totally bonkers backdrop. Nina Proudman was unlike any other leading lady on Australian TV — distracted, overwhelmed, possibly psychotic.

God, we relished in it. A woman like us! Sometimes a mess but doing her best – it was easy to see the appeal. Through dream sequences and flashbacks that offered insight into Nina’s true feelings about work, romance and endless family crises, Offspring told us it was fine to feel like an impostor, to be afraid or discombobulated or incapable. We knew it from the first episode,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

A Month of Sundays duo Anthony Lapaglia and Matthew Saville in conversation

Justine Clarke, Anthony Lapaglia and Matthew Saville on-set.

Palace Cinemas will host actor Anthony Lapaglia and director Matthew Saville for preview screenings of their new film, A Month of Sundays, at Palace Norton Street in Sydney (April 19) and Palace Cinema Como (April 21) in Melbourne.

Screenings will be followed by a Q&A with the pair.

Lapaglia plays Frank Mollard, a divorced Adelaide real-estate agent with a teenage son who strikes up a friendship with an elderly stranger, played by Julia Blake.

This is Saville's third film after Noise and Felony. The filmmaker also has a long resume on TV, including Graham Kennedy TV movie The King, The Secret Life of Us, We Can Be Heroes and Please Like Me..

Tickets for the preview screenings can be purchased here.
See full article at IF.com.au »

Tomorrow When the War Began bows April 23 on ABC3, debuts trailer

Tomorrow When the War Began, the series based on John Marsden's novels, premieres April 23 at 7:30pm on ABC3.

The six-part adventure series tells the story of a group of young Australian friends on the run from a foreign invasion force.

The unsuspecting Australian military is quickly overwhelmed and none of Australia.s allies are willing to risk possible nuclear war to come to our aid.

Veterans Sibylla Budd, Deborah Mailman, James Stewart and Alison Bell are joined by relative newcomers Molly Daniels, Narek Arman, Jon Prasida, Madeleine Clunies-Ross, Madeleine Madden, Andrew Creer, Fantine Banulski and Keith Purcell.

Daniels plays Ellie, the heroine of the books. The young actor starred in two seasons of ABC3's You're Skitting Me, as well as Very Small Business, Party Tricks and The Librarians.

An Ambience Entertainment Production in association with ABC3, Screen Australia and FilmVictoria, the show is produced by Michael Boughen
See full article at IF.com.au »

BBC commissions Kris Mrksa's Requiem

Kris Mrksa

Australian screenwriter Kris Mrksa (Glitch, Janet King, The Slap, Underbelly, The Secret Life of Us) will write a six-part series for BBC Drama..

Requiem will be made by New Pictures (coming off the back of a great success with The Missing, starring Australia's Frances O'Connor) and will consist of six one-hour episodes. The show will be executive produced by Willow Grylls, Elaine Pyke and Charlie Pattinson for New Pictures and Polly Hill for BBC One.

A thriller which flirts with the supernatural, Requiem is the story of a young woman who discovers, in the wake of her mother's death, that everything she thought she knew about herself was a lie.

So: expect a more adult, ambiguous, and female version of Harry Potter.

"Requiem is the show I've always wanted to make", Mrksa said. "To be making it with the team at New Pictures, and for the BBC, a
See full article at IF.com.au »

John Edwards returns to his indie roots

After 27 years with the Southern Star Group and now Endemol Shine Australia, John Edwards is going solo.

Edwards, who will reactivate his banner Rough Diamond Entertainment, describes the split as entirely amicable.

He will continue as a creative consultant for the sixth season of Offspring with producer Imogen Banks and the production team, and will work with Endemol Shine on a number of other scripted projects.

Banks and Mimi Butler transferred to Endemol Shine from the former Southern Star Endemol.

Endemol Shine CEOs Mark and Carl Fennessy said, .John Edwards is a true industry legend and one of the finest producers in the country. John leaves us on the very best of terms..

Edwards tells If, .This is very happy, very amicable. I have nothing but the highest regard for Mark and Carl: they are exceptional producers. This is a personal and business decision.

.The time has come for me
See full article at IF.com.au »

New drama for Love Child star

A Playmaker Media drama starring Jessica Marais and a reality series which reunites people with long-lost family members are among six new Australian shows for Network Ten in 2016.

The line-up includes Australian Survivor, All Star Family Feud, the spin-off I.m A Celebrity. Get Me Out Of Here! Now, and the previously announced telemovie Brock.

Ten said more new local series will be announced next year as it strives to build the momentum which saw the broadcaster record its highest commercial prime time shares since 2011 as audiences increased by 15 per cent this year.

In Playmaker Media's The Wrong Girl, Love Child star Marais will play Lily, a modern woman caught between two guys — one too good to be true and the other so wrong he might be Mr. Right.. Lily and her flatmate Simone are supposed to be taking a sabbatical from men but Lily falls in love with Jack,
See full article at IF.com.au »

Edwards laments lack of new dramas and talent

John Edwards today likened the state of the Australian TV drama production industry to a .stagnant billabong,. marked by fewer series, the same writers, inflated costs for no apparent quality gain, shrinking audiences and increasingly reliance on subsidy.

.All the openness and excitement and bringing through of new talent, of new work, has certainly dissipated, and the area that has historically been the largest and most productive sector of the broadcast industry has all but disappeared,. the veteran producer said in his Hector Crawford memorial lecture at Screen Forever.

.People keep saying it.s the golden age of television drama. If the emperor doesn.t have no clothes, he certainly seems to be wearing very weird underwear..

Edwards lamented the demise of the 40-part and 22-part series and said 13-parters are almost an anachronism.. He noted 6-8 part dramas typically cost $1 million- $1.2 million per hour and once those production structures
See full article at IF.com.au »

John Edwards to deliver Hector Crawford lecture

Pre-eminent drama producer John Edwards will deliver the Hector Crawford memorial lecture next Wednesday at the Screen Forever conference in Melbourne.

Edwards' productions have won 39 AFI and Aacta Awards, four People.s Choice Awards, eight Astra Awards, 29 Logies, more than a dozen craft awards in Australia and international accolades including three New York Festival Awards and a Golden Globe nomination.

Now with Endemol Shine Australia, he has produced more than 600 hours of television drama including The Beautiful Lie, Offspring, Gallipoli, Love My Way, Paper Giants, The Secret Life of Us and Police Rescue.

Among his other credits are The Surgeon, Dangerous, Rush, Tangle, Puberty Blues, Party Tricks, the Golden Globe nominated mini-series On the Beach, Marking Time, which won seven AFI Awards, six telemovies in the Cody series, and Beaconsfield.

Screen Producers Australia CEO Matt Deaner said, .Edwards. contribution to Australian television drama is incomparable to any other contemporary figure in the country.
See full article at IF.com.au »

Rachel Weisz Considers Helping Shape A Nation In The Favourite

Academy Award winner Rachel Weisz is in talks to work with her The Lobster director Yorgos Lanthimos once again, on a film about three women who rose to power in the 17th century, and left a legacy that is still felt today. The Favourite is an historical drama, written by newcomer Deborah Davis, and Tony McNamara (The Secret Life Of Us), which focuses on the complicated relationships between British monarch Queen Anne, and two of her closest advisors – Sarah Churchill and Abigail Masham. While Weisz is said to be circling the role of Churchill, Emma Stone will play Masham, while the role of Queen Anne will be filled by the multiple award-winning Olivia Colman (Hot Fuzz, Tyrannosaur).

Queen Anne succeeded William III as monarch of England, Scotland and Ireland in 1702, becoming the first monarch of Great Britain and Ireland, after the Acts of Union were passed in 1707, uniting England and Scotland as one nation.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Matchbox Pictures hires Higgs

  • IF.com.au
Amanda Higgs has joined Matchbox Pictures as creative producer as she prepares to start production on the ABC TV drama Barracuda.

Higgs, who was script editor on Matchbox Pictures/ABC's The Slap, most recently produced two series of The Time of Our Lives for the public broadcaster.

Before that she served as acting head of drama and commissioning editor at the ABC, where she also executive produced dramas and comedies. She was also consultant Ep for Fox8 on SLiDE.

At Southern Star she co-created and produced Network 10.s The Secret Life of Us, the most watched Oz. drama in the 16-39 year old demographic.

Based on the book of the same name by Christos Tsiolkas, Barracuda follows young Olympic hopeful Danny Kelly as he deals with the pressure of obsession. Rob Connolly is directing with scripts by Belinda Chayko and Blake Ayshford.

Matchbox MD Chris Oliver-Taylor said: .Amanda.s track record is formidable,
See full article at IF.com.au »

Ford and Samson star in unlikely love story

Luke Ford and Anna Samson play a distinctly odd couple at the centre of What Time Is My Heart?, the debut feature from writer-director Romi Trower.

Produced by Tristram Miall, the privately financed film also features Brooke Satchwell, Wade Briggs, Meyne Wyatt, Eddie Baroo and Kaarin Fairfax. Shooting wrapped in suburban Melbourne at the end of last month.

Ford, whose recent credits include Infini, Catching Milat and Deadline Gallipoli, plays Adrian, an It genius with a penchant for fast cars, leather gloves and soppy 1980s pop music, who also happens to have Ocd.

Samson (The Doctor Blake Mysteries, Winners & Losers) is Grace, a street artist with multiple personalities who can only engage in sexual activity through her promiscuous alter ego named G.

The new neighbours find themselves in therapy with the same psychiatrist and share a walk home one evening, beginning a kind of impossible love story with no touching,
See full article at IF.com.au »

Lament for the decline in 13-part dramas

The co-creator of Offspring has deplored the decline of the 13-episode Australian drama and criticised the shift to shorter-run .puzzle. dramas. .I feel quite sad that the 13-parter seems to be fading in Australia,. Debra Oswald said in an interview for the Swinburne Institute for Social Research.s report TV 2025: Reconsidering small screen media in Australia by Jock Given, Michael Brealey and Cathy Gray.

.People now just seem to just want six or eight,. said Oswald, who created Offspring with John Edwards and Imogen Banks and worked on the 13-part show for all five seasons.

However two networks dispute that view.. Angus Ross, Seven Network Director of Programming, tells If: .It.s a matter of finding the right format for the story being told. The suggestion that the 13-part series is dead is premature in my view..

Andy Ryan, co-head of drama at the Nine Network says, "The 13-parter
See full article at IF.com.au »
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