A contradictory picture of Nazism in the Swedish aristocracy. To distance themselves from Nazism is obvious for most people. But not for everyone.

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Carl Johan De Geer ...
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A contradictory picture of Nazism in the Swedish aristocracy. To distance themselves from Nazism is obvious for most people. But not for everyone.

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Documentary | Short

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Release Date:

7 July 2001 (Czech Republic)  »

Also Known As:

Grandmother, Hitler and I  »

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Featured in CJDG - En film om Carl Johan De Geer (2014) See more »

Soundtracks

Götterdämmerung
Composed by Richard Wagner
Conducted by Hans Knappertsbusch
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User Reviews

a quick sketch of desolation
5 September 2005 | by (oklahoma city, oklahoma) – See all my reviews

WARNING: THIS IS A "SPOILER" REVIEW

This Swedish artist who is the subject of this 17-minute cinematic memoir has an objective disposition, but he sometimes needs to get in touch with his memories, dreams and reflections. In order to do this, he first recreates some custom from childhood. This film follows him after such a recreation, as his thoughts begin to unfold and spiral outward, for a while. This film is thus a didactic exposition, an instructive display of psychological technique.

After cooking a dish that his deceased grandmother often prepared for him during his childhood, the artist begins to speak of her and the objects she kept in her house, her movements around town (Stockholm), and her personal goodness. The stunning surprise comes when he displays her copies of the elegant coffee-table magazine, Art in Germany, which was published from 1938 until 1945. It was edited by Albert Speer, the architect, and devoted to showing the best art and architecture in Nazi Germany. Grandmother was a Nazi.

Roman Polanski once observed that the old couple who took him in during the War -- not knowing he was Jewish, and despising all Jews even though they had never knowingly met one -- were good to him, and pleasant people. This he juxtaposed against his father, an intelligent man with an egalitarian outlook, who was unpleasant and unbearable in close quarters. This artist offers the same surreal juxtaposition, but instead of a epic drama he uses a quickly sketched Magic Marker drawing to show the spiritual desolation left by the Hitler years.


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