Mr. and Mrs. Consumer find that they have no food in the house. It is salary day, so they depart for the market which is a monopoly and presided over by a syndicate representing the goods ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview:
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Uncle Sam (as Alec Frank)
Lamar Johnstone ...
Mr. Consumer
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Mrs. Consumer
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Mr. Blacksmith
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Mr. Mailman (as William Dunne)
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King Sugar
John Troyano ...
Mr. Bricklayer
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The Widow (as Miss Stewart)
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Storyline

Mr. and Mrs. Consumer find that they have no food in the house. It is salary day, so they depart for the market which is a monopoly and presided over by a syndicate representing the goods they controlled. Their motto is "Our prices, all we can get." This syndicate is composed of kings, thus divided: Milk, butter and eggs, coal, bread, sugar, meat, clothing and tobacco. At this market there is a great gathering which finally thins out to the few who have enough money to satisfy the grasping kings. The various types of consumers buy or try to buy their necessities at exorbitant prices. The kings are greedy and cruel. Finally unable to bear these impositions, the people become impatient and resolve to do something to repair their wrongs. The kings have a reunion and make a mound of their bags of gold, which they worship. It is transformed into the God of Greed, around which they group and command the people to cease their complaints. A meeting of the discontented people is in progress ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Drama

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Release Date:

10 June 1912 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

We believe the hot-heads will like it
3 December 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A two reel feature picture which is, by intention, a political argument and deals with a pertinent topic of the day, abnormally high prices. As a picture, it has much to commend it; but the reviewer finds it the most difficult subject to review that he has yet met. It is not a reviewer's business to discuss political questions or social questions; but it is his duty to tell the exhibitor just what he is getting, so far as he can, and to tell it plainly enough so that the exhibitor will be able to judge for himself. This picture is partisan. It is no cold picture of present day conditions; but an exaggerated and one-sided view of them, let the wrongs that it shows be what they may. Again, without any intention on the producer's part, it has, none the less, a thread of anarchy or at least revolution running through it. In the first place, its showing of conditions is carried beyond the border line of true sanity into pessimism. Again, it is, at times, violent and full of disregard for law and just procedure. It is so, merely because it is violent. It favors Democrats more than Republicans; for while at the end, it shows photographs of Wilson, Harmon, Roosevelt and Taft, it shows a cartoon each with Roosevelt and Taft. We believe the hot- heads will like it; we fear the cold-heads of both parties will not. It is a very effective production. It makes use of the most daring expedients, but gets them over in fine shape. It was made by men who had imagination in marked degree. - The Moving Picture World, June 29, 1912


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