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Gurinder Chadha Joins UK Initiative Tackling Gender Imbalance in the Film Industry

13 April 2017 12:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Gurinder Chadha: The Upcoming/YouTube

Based in the UK and want to learn from the best and brightest in the film business? Listen up. Female Film Leaders is an industry forum that “aims to equip up-and-coming female film industry executives with the inspiration and advice they need to compete successfully at the highest echelons of the film industry,” according to the nonprofit’s official site.

The initiative invites prominent figures working in the film industry to speak candidly about their extensive careers and the lessons they’ve learned along the way to a small audience of junior industry executives. Sessions, held every few months, are free to attend. “Bend It Like Beckham” helmer Gurinder Chadha and BFI Head of International Isabel Davis are the latest industry leaders to sign up for the forum, ScreenDaily reports.

Producer Tessa Ross (“Suffragette,” “Room”) and Amanda Nevill, Chief Executive of the BFI, are among those who have taken part in the series this year. Speakers from 2016 include Alison Owen from Monumental Pictures and Katie Goodson-Thomas from Fox Searchlight.

The forum was founded by Emma Dutton, partner at UK production outfit Sharp House, Emma Yap, junior acquisitions executive at NBC Universal, and Yana Georgieva, international sales manager at Bankside Films.

Chadha’s latest film, “Viceroy’s House,” is currently playing in the UK. The period drama centers on the final months of British rule in India. Next, Chadha will helm “Song for a Spy,” about a female Indian World War II spy. She’s also branching out into TV, with plans to “tell stories about people on the margins, or hidden histories and voices, and [bring] them to the fore.”

For more information about Female Film Leaders and upcoming events, head over to their site.

Gurinder Chadha Joins UK Initiative Tackling Gender Imbalance in the Film Industry was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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MIPTV Feels Full Impact of Digital TV Revolution

6 April 2017 7:54 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Cannes — Graced by enticing pre-l.A. screenings of Disney and Lionsgate shows and large excitement at sneak-peaked scenes from Adam Price’s “Ride Upon the Storm” and Tom Tykwer’s “Babylon Berlin,” 2017’s MipTV trade fair underscored why Hollywood still dominates much of global TV, as well as the new raised bar of ambition of European dramas.

Amazon’s Roy Price laid out plans for Amazon to drive into more originals, though he did not go into specifics. Both Amazon and Netflix took meetings with key content suppliers at MipTV. Meanwhile, MipTV caught the TV business, and indeed the world, in vertiginous transition, thanks in business terms to a phenomenon little short of a revolution: the global broadcast of foreign-language shows, currently driven by Netflix.

Change, however, goes beyond that. Not for nothing, The Wit’s Virginia Mouseler drilled down in a Wednesday Fresh TV Fiction on 2017 as the “Year of Trans-Genre, »

- John Hopewell

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Gurinder Chadha Moves to TV with FremantleMedia-Backed Bend It TV

3 April 2017 11:02 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Gurinder Chadha: Red Carpet News TV/YouTube

Gurinder Chadha is branching out into television. The “Bend It Like Beckham” director’s TV production company, Bend It TV, will receive 25 percent backing from FremantleMedia, Variety writes. Bend It TV aims to develop “upscale scripted content” as well as non-scripted content and other entertainment formats. According to the source, the deal stemmed from Fremantle drama chief Sarah Doole’s efforts to expand the company’s number of scripted series.

Planning to use the medium to tell “stories on a big scale,” Chadha believes working in TV will allow her to share her work globally. “The audience now picks and chooses because of the [different] platforms,” she emphasized. “For someone like me who has always been trying to tell different kinds of stories, finally an audience can have access to them. That is the most exciting thing for a filmmaker like me, someone who wants to tell stories about people on the margins, or hidden histories and voices, and bringing them to the fore.”

Although she is best known as a film director, Variety reveals that Chadha began her career on Channel 4’s “The Media Show” in the UK and is happy to return to her roots. “In my experience of late, television is much more open and responsive these days than the British film industry at getting those stories out there, getting them produced, made, and on screens,” she observed.

Describing her approach to storytelling — in any medium — Chadha said she is interested in “great content that is effortlessly diverse.” Expanding on that idea, she added, “My brand has always had a global reach and represents British storytelling, but from a diverse perspective.”

According to Variety, Chadha is especially excited to work with Fremantle due to its inclusion of women like Doole and CEO Cecile Frot-Coutaz in senior leadership roles. “I am working with bright, intelligent women at the top of their game, and we have a shorthand. When I pitch a story or idea they get it, so it allows me to be more productive,” Chadha explained.

The respect is mutual. Frot-Coutaz commented, “Gurinder is a phenomenal storyteller and a real auteur; I’m thrilled to be working with her. When we set out to build our scripted business, at the top of my list was working with and supporting the best creative talent in the world, and this new partnership truly exemplifies that goal.”

Chadha made her feature directorial debut with 1993’s “Bhaji on the Beach.” “I was the first Indian woman to direct a feature film in Britain,” she said of the experience, “and now I’m still the only Asian woman directing feature films in the British film industry. That shows how hard it is to get out there.”

Since “Bhaji,” Chadha has directed “Bend It Like Beckham,” “Bride & Prejudice,” the short film “Quais de Seine,” “Angus, Thongs and Perfect Snogging,” and “It’s a Wonderful Afterlife.” Her latest film, “Viceroy’s House,” is set during the 1947 Partition — when India’s independence led to the bloody division of its territory. It is currently playing in the UK.

Next, Chadha will helm “Song for a Spy,” about a female Indian World War II spy. She recently donated her entire working archive to the British Film Institute’s National Archive.

Gurinder Chadha Moves to TV with FremantleMedia-Backed Bend It TV was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

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Miptv day one: Gurinder Chadha, Agatha Christie, 'Gomorrah' deals

3 April 2017 5:58 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Gurinder Chadha indie gets backing; Series Mania launches in Australia.

Freemantle backs Gurinder Chadha’s Bend It TV

British production company FreemantleMedia has taken a 25% stake in Bend It Like Beckham and Viceroy’s House director Gurinder Chadha’s UK indie Bend It TV, which focuses on scripted content.

Walter Presents grabs Studiocanal political thriller

Studiocanal has inked further deals on its political thriller series Baron Noir, including with Us based SVoD platform Walter Presents, which is a joint venture from Channel 4 and Global Series Network.

The 8x60 drama series was broadcast in France last year and a second season is now in development. The programme was recently acquired by Sony Channel for Germany where it will launch on April 6, as well as Sbs Australia and Amazon Prime in the UK.

Baron Noir

Series Mania launches in Australia

French TV festival Series Mania is launching an Australian incarnation in partnership with the Australian Centre for the »

- tom.grater@screendaily.com (Tom Grater)

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FremantleMedia Takes Stake In Gurinder Chadha’s Bend It TV — Miptv

3 April 2017 12:42 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

FremantleMedia has taken a 25% stake in Gurinder Chadha's scripted indie outfit Bend It TV. Chadha, the Kenyan-born Brit director behind titles such as Bend It Like Beckham, Bride and Prejudice and Angus, Thongs and Perfect Snogging, is coming off of the back of her latest feature Viceroy's House, which was released in the UK last month. "Gurinder is a phenomenal storyteller and a real auteur; I'm thrilled to be working with her," said Cecile Frot-Coutaz, CEO of… »

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Miptv: FremantleMedia Takes Stake in Gurinder Chadha’s Bend It TV

2 April 2017 10:50 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Production giant FremantleMedia has taken a 25 percent stake in Bend It TV, the independent television production house owned by British director Gurinder Chadha (Bend It Like Beckham, Viceroy's House.) Bend It TV focuses on developing and producing primetime scripted drama.

“Gurinder is a phenomenal storyteller and a real auteur; I’m thrilled to be working with her,” said FremantleMedia CEO Cecile Frot-Coutaz in a statement. “When we set out to build our scripted business, at the top of my list was working with and supporting the best creative talent in the world and this new partnership truly exemplifies that goal.”

»

- Scott Roxborough

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Miptv: FremantleMedia Takes Stake in Gurinder Chadha’s Bend It TV

2 April 2017 10:50 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

Production giant FremantleMedia has taken a 25 percent stake in Bend It TV, the independent television production house owned by British director Gurinder Chadha (Bend It Like Beckham, Viceroy's House.) Bend It TV focuses on developing and producing primetime scripted drama.

“Gurinder is a phenomenal storyteller and a real auteur; I’m thrilled to be working with her,” said FremantleMedia CEO Cecile Frot-Coutaz in a statement. “When we set out to build our scripted business, at the top of my list was working with and supporting the best creative talent in the world and this new partnership truly exemplifies that goal.”

»

- Scott Roxborough

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‘Bend It Like Beckham’ Director Gurinder Chadha Teams With FremantleMedia for Drive Into TV (Exclusive)

2 April 2017 10:20 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

British director Gurinder Chadha, best known for movies like “Bend It Like Beckham” and “Viceroy’s House,” is accelerating her drive into television production with the backing of global production giant FremantleMedia.

FremantleMedia, which has been expanding its scripted slate under drama chief Sarah Doole, will take a 25% stake in Chadha’s television production company Bend It TV, which is focusing on upscale scripted content.

FremantleMedia CEO Cecile Frot-Coutaz said: “Gurinder is a phenomenal storyteller and a real auteur; I’m thrilled to be working with her. When we set out to build our scripted business, at the top of my list was working with and supporting the best creative talent in the world, and this new partnership truly exemplifies that goal.”

Chadha, who was awarded an OBE for services to the British film industry in 2006, has directed films such as “Bend It Like Beckham” (2003), “Bride and Prejudice” (2004) and “Angus, Thongs »

- John Hopewell and Leo Barraclough

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What Happened to the Women Directors in Hollywood? Part 5: 2000–2017

24 March 2017 2:02 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Mira Nair and Ava DuVernay: Wikimedia Commons/IndiaFM/Bollywoodhungama/usbotschaftberlin

by Carrie Rickey

This five-part Truthdig series by Carrie Rickey is published in partnership with Women and Hollywood. The series considers the historic accomplishments of women behind the camera, how they got marginalized, and how they are fighting for equal employment. Specifically, this series asks, why do females make up between 33 and 50 percent of film-school graduates but account for only seven percent of working directors? What happened to the women directors in Hollywood?

Female filmmakers greeted the 21st century with optimism. By most measures, movies by women were garnering increased respect in the industry and at the multiplex. Their makers cracked glass ceilings, created new genres, and established new box-office records.

With “Nowhere in Africa” (2001), Caroline Link became the second woman to direct the Oscar-winner for the year’s best foreign film. With “Lost in Translation” (2003), Sofia Coppola was the third woman to receive a best director nomination from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. And with “The Hurt Locker” (2009), Kathryn Bigelow was the fourth woman nominated in the directing category — and the first to win. The following year, Danish filmmaker Susanna Bier directed the winner in the best foreign film category, “In a Better World.”

Gina Prince-Bythewood’s “Love & Basketball” (2000), Karyn Kusama’s “Girlfight” (2000) and Gurinder Chadha’s “Bend It Like Beckham” (2003) created what might be called the “Title IX” movie, celebrating female athletes on the court, in the ring, and on the field. These are sports movies that celebrate the female body — not for its sex appeal, but for its power. These films inspired younger women (and their mothers were thrilled to take them to movies that didn’t objectify women).

Comedies by women continued to make serious box office, proving the Hollywood wisdom that “funny is money.” Nancy Meyers’ “What Women Want” (2000), starring Mel Gibson as a player briefly given the power to hear what women think about him, made $374 million. Sharon Maguire’s “Bridget Jones’s Diary” (2001), in which the title character says what she thinks about womanizers and prigs, brought in $282 million. Movies like these permitted men and women to laugh at men’s foibles.

From Patricia Cardoso’s “Real Women Have Curves” (2002), which introduced America Ferrera as a college-bound Latina, to Julie Taymor’s biopic “Frida” (2003), with Salma Hayek as Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, to Patty Jenkins’ “Monster” (2003), with Charlize Theron as serial killer Aileen Wuornos, audiences saw realistic women — as opposed to human swizzle sticks with breasts — in movies by women.

Many critics hailed Niki Caro’s “Whale Rider” (2003), about a Maori preteen who challenges her tribal patriarchy and becomes the new chief, as a harbinger of the triumph of female filmmakers over the status quo. Others pointed to the fact that for the first time since records had been kept, in 2000 women made 11 percent of the top 250 box office films. For women who make movies, the new century felt like a new day.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Sadly, that encouraging percentage turned out to be a fluke. After 2000, the number dwindled. It remains stuck in the 6 to 9 percent range, says Martha Lauzen, professor of communications and head of the Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film at San Diego State University. Since 1998 Lauzen has tracked women working in the industry in her annual “Celluloid Ceiling” report.

“When I started this, I thought it was merely an issue of people not knowing how low the numbers were,” Lauzen said ruefully. “I didn’t know how slow social change is.”

Lauzen’s reporting represents one of three vital resources for understanding the triumphs female filmmakers have made and how far they need to go to achieve parity with men. The others are Stacy Smith’s Media Diversity and Social Change Institute at USC’s Annenberg School and The Bunche Center at UCLA.

Collectively and individually, these creators of annual good news/bad news reports have kept the issue of representation in the public eye.

The Good: For Kathryn Bigelow (“The Hurt Locker,” “Zero Dark Thirty”), the late Nora Ephron (“Julie & Julia”), and Nancy Meyers (“It’s Complicated,” “The Intern”), the 21st century has been a fruitful time. So, too, for younger female moviemakers. Consider Lisa Cholodenko (“Laurel Canyon,” “The Kids Are All Right”), Ava DuVernay (“Selma,” “13th”), and Mira Nair (“Monsoon Wedding,” “The Namesake”).

Consider also that Catherine Hardwicke established a franchise with “Twilight” (which made $393 million), Sam Taylor-Johnson created another with “50 Shades of Grey” ($571 million), and that Anne Fletcher’s “The Proposal” made $317 million and Phyllida Lloyd’s “Mamma Mia!” earned $609 million.

Additionally, filmmakers like Dee Rees (“Pariah”), Debra Granik (“Winter’s Bone”), and Lone Scherfig (“An Education”) broke into the market with unique visions and eyes for new talent, including Adepero Oduye, Jennifer Lawrence, and Carey Mulligan. Significantly, Vicky Jenson (“Shrek”), Jennifer Lee (“Frozen”), Jennifer Yuh Nelson (“Kung Fu Panda 2”), and Brenda Chapman (“Brave”) staked a place for women in animation.

The Bad: For every woman appearing onscreen in movies in 2015 there were 2.3 men, according to Stacy Smith’s Media Diversity & Social Change Initiative.

The Ugly: When Walt Hickey, culture reporter for the website fivethirtyeight.com, goes to the movies and sees the screen population is 69 percent male, it just looks wrong to him. “It’s like something apocalyptic has happened, like a parallel universe — a man’s world,” he says.

Both Lauzen’s and Smith’s data show that when a woman is behind the camera and/or screenplay, 39 percent of protagonists are female. In movies by male directors, only four percent of the lead characters are female.

A century ago, male dominance behind the camera and on the screen was not the norm. For women behind the camera, it’s been the norm since 1920. And for women onscreen, it’s been the norm since 1950. Because of this, moviegoers have a distorted picture of America as predominantly male and predominantly Caucasian, when it is neither. (For finer-grain data on minority representation, see this annual report from UCLA’s Bunche Center.)

The Force Reawakens

The Hollywood Dream Factory tailors the majority of its product to the measurements of the men in the audience. This troubles those who want their daughters to partake of the same professional opportunities, cultural representation, and dream lives as their sons. While “Nine to Five,” “Norma Rae,” and “Erin Brockovich” show that studios love stories of women who triumph over the odds, there is less obvious love for female filmmakers trying to beat the odds stacked against them in their professional lives.

Since the Original Six filed suit against two studios in 1983 (see Part 3), female filmmakers have met, strategized, and troubleshot. So much so that in one of her final essays before her death in 2012, Nora Ephron made a list of “Things I Won’t Miss.” Near the top: “Panels on Women in Film.” Many women in film felt as though they were running in place.

“Instead of holding a million panels about it,” Christine Vachon, producer of “Boys Don’t Cry” and “Carol,” exclaimed at the 2016 Sundance Festival, “let’s do something about it!”

Someone had. She is Maria Giese, director of the feature films “When Saturday Comes” and “Hunger.” In February 2013 she brought a complaint to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (Eeoc) in Los Angeles. Her contention was that the cohort of working filmmakers in the Directors Guild of America (DGA), of which she is a member, was overwhelmingly male.

(While the number of women in the guild directing episodic television amounts to 17 percent, the DGA 2015 census of female filmmakers registered 6.4 percent. That’s lower than the nine percent of female coal miners, and fractional next to the 32 percent of practicing physicians and 36 percent of practicing lawyers who are women).

The Eeoc, which collects data on employer/employee relations for each calendar year, was reluctant to take on a class-action suit.

In April 2013, Giese contacted the Aclu of Southern California and showed the evidence to Melissa Goodman, director of its Lgbtq, Gender & Reproductive Justice Project. For the next two years Goodman and her colleague Ariela Migdal took testimony from more than 50 female directors. In May 2015 they sent the Eeoc an extraordinary letter that counted the ways in which “female filmmakers are effectively excluded from directing big-budget films and seriously underrepresented in television.” A compelling argument in their letter: “The entertainment industry employs many people and makes products that profoundly shape our culture and the perception of women and girls.” Later in 2015, the Eeoc commenced its own investigation.

In January 2017, based on a high-level internal DGA leak received by Giese, Deadline Hollywood reported that after a federal investigation spanning a year that included testimony from over 100 women directors, the Eeoc recently served charges of sex discrimination and unfair hiring practice against all six major studios. While the federal agency does not comment on active cases, Gillian Thomas and Melissa Goodman of the Aclu wrote in an editorial that they had no reason to doubt the veracity of the leak.

A key factor contributing to Giese’s success in getting this issue to the Aclu and Eeoc was her ability to expose the structural obstacles female filmmakers face, from a guild that puts female and minority filmmakers in the same category, to the studios that question the fitness of women to direct.

Myths and Continued Underrepresentation

Over the 25 years I’ve reported on female filmmakers, I’ve interviewed two generations of movie executives. Most, but not all, were male. Most took seriously my questions about the apparent exclusion of women behind the camera, both on the screen and their forthcoming line-up.

Without exception, all of them retold one or more of the “Three Hollywood Myths.”

Myth #1) “Women don’t want to direct action movies and those are the films which are making money.”

Untrue. See: Martha Coolidge’s “Real Genius” (1985), Kathryn Bigelow’s “Point Break” (1991), Mimi Leder’s “The Peacemaker” (1997) and “Deep Impact” (1998), Lexi Alexander’s “Punisher: War Zone” (2008), and Bigelow’s “The Hurt Locker” (2009) and “Zero Dark Thirty” (2012).

What is true is that Patty Jenkins was hired to direct “Thor: The Dark World” (2013) and left due to creative differences. She is now working on the forthcoming “Wonder Woman.”

What is true is that Mira Nair was offered a “Harry Potter” film and chose instead to make the family drama “The Namesake” because the material was more important to her, and that Ava DuVernay was offered “Black Panther,” the film version of the Marvel Comics series, and declined for similar reasons.

Myth #2) “Movies by women don’t make money.”

Untrue again. Some movies by women don’t make back their investment, just as some movies by men do not. What is true is that many movies by women make major bank. Catherine Hardwicke’s little $37 million film “Twilight” grossed $393 million and launched a billion-dollar franchise.

Hardwicke told me by phone that she hears all the time from studios that films by women are poor investments. “And every time you say, ‘Well, this one made money, that one made money,’ they say, ‘This one made money because it was based on a best-selling book,’ or ‘That one made money because of its hot actress.’”

Here are six more films by women and their box-office grosses. They made money because they powerfully connected with audiences.

Bend it Like Beckham” (Gurinder Chadha). Cost: $6 million/Gross: $77 million“Frida” (Julie Taymor). Cost: $12 million/Gross: $56 million“Frozen” (Jennifer Lee). Cost: $150 million/Gross: $1.2 billion“The Proposal” (Anne Fletcher). Cost: $40 million/Gross: $317 million“Selma” (Ava DuVernay). Cost: $20 million/Gross $67 million“Lost in Translation” (Sofia Coppola). Cost: $4 million/Gross $120 million

Myth #3) “A woman behind the camera means women on the screen and no men in the audience.”

Untrue, if taken literally. Sometimes movies by women have a lower percentage of men in the audience, just as sometimes movies by men have a lower percentage of women in the audience. Take, for example, the 2015 films, “Bridge of Spies” by Steven Spielberg and “The Intern” by Nancy Meyers.

According to Paul Dergarabedian of comScore, the research company’s “PostTrak” data shows the audience gender breakdown at “Bridge of Spies,” a ’60s-era political thriller starring Tom Hanks, was 54 percent male and 46 percent female. For “The Intern,” a contemporary workplace comedy co-starring Anne Hathaway and Robert De Niro, it was 41 percent male and 59 percent female. Spielberg’s film grossed $165 million; Meyers’ $194 million. His budget was $40 million; hers was $35 million.

Ava DuVernay’s “Selma,” the story of the 1965 march for voting rights led by Martin Luther King and starring David Oyelowo, had an audience gender breakdown of 47 percent male and 53 percent female. The assumption that movies come gendered with a blue or pink ribbon is a canard that still lingers in Hollywood, perhaps a vestige of the target marketing that began in the 1980s.

Speaking from the set of “Queen Sugar” in 2016, DuVernay observed, “We’re in a place right now where every other film is about a comic book superhero. We’re top-heavy with testosterone.”

How did Hollywood, a century ago a place where female directors thrived and prospered, come to this?

Stacy Title, director of “The Last Supper” and “The Bye Bye Man,” points the finger at “unconscious bias.”

Mira Nair, who was born in India, suspects chauvinism. “I’ve always remarked at the irony that the percentage of female directors is higher in India than in the United States,” she explained in a phone conversation. “India is supposed to be the traditional chauvinist culture,” she observes. Nair wonders if the historic examples of female prime ministers in South Asia — Indira Gandhi in India, Benazir Bhutto in Pakistan — may have broken the glass ceiling for all professional women there. “Their examples don’t exist in the U.S.”

DuVernay looks forward to the outcome — and hoped-for positive resolution — of the Eeoc investigation. “It’s a systematic problem and it requires radical change,” she said. “If it’s not happening organically, systems should be put in place.” Like many female filmmakers, DuVernay hopes the Eeoc can reconfigure what Giese calls the “vertical playing field for women” into a level one.

“One thing I’m heartened by,” said Nair, who’s been making features for nearly 30 years, “is that the variety and confidence of female filmmakers today is inspiring.”

Do others think it’s changed for the better for women since the 1980s?

“For me, there’s no comparison between the ’80s and now,” reflected Nancy Meyers, whose six films as a director or writer/director have grossed more than a billion dollars. By email she wrote:

Men were still getting used to us being on set in the ’80s. (Men used to have photos of pinups on the set in the ’80s! I’m not kidding.)The only women around back then worked in costumes and hair and makeup. Today women are in every department and often department heads. There are still very few women in the camera department and that’s a shame. That seems to still be a real boy’s club. Today, most crew members are far more comfortable working for and with women.

Yet one thing has not changed: “Now, getting the job to be the director — that’s still an uphill battle,” Meyers said.

In addition to writing film reviews and essays for Truthdig, Carrie Rickey has been a film critic at The Philadelphia Inquirer and Village Voice, and an art critic at Artforum and Art in America. Rickey has taught at various institutions, including School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania, and has appeared frequently on NPR’s “Talk of the Nation,” MSNBC, and CNN.

What Happened to the Women Directors in Hollywood? Part 5: 2000–2017 was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Women and Hollywood

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'Viceroy's House' Director Gurinder Chadha Donates Archive to British Film Institute

6 March 2017 2:37 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Just weeks after her latest film, Viceroy's House, had its world premiere in Berlin, Gurinder Chadha has donated her entire working archive to the British Film Institute's National Archive. 

The BFI helped produced the Punjabi-British filmmaker's breakthrough, the 1989 documentary I'm British but.... Since then, Chadha has directed features such as 1993's BAFTA-nominated Bhaji on the Beach and Bend It Like Beckham, which smashed box-office records for a British film in 2002, alongside titles such as Bride and Prejudice (2004), Angus, Thongs and Perfect Snogging (2008) and It's a Wonderful Afterlife (2010).

She was awarded an Order of the British Empire award in 2006 for »

- Alex Ritman

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Viceroy’s House movie review: are we condemned to repeat this?

2 March 2017 6:29 AM, PST | www.flickfilosopher.com | See recent FlickFilosopher news »

MaryAnn’s quick take… Snappy, snappish historical drama about the partition of India rings with sly humor, dry cynicism, and a smack of relevance for today’s divisive politics. I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

In 1947, Lord Louis “Dickie” Mountbatten, cousin to King George VI, was sent to India as its last viceroy, to rule in George’s stead — he was Emperor of India, of course — and to facilitate that nation’s transition to independence. And as depicted in Viceroy’s House, Gurinder Chadha’s snappy and later snappish drama about the handover, Mountbatten is initially a rather cheery midwife to the end of the British Empire. Hugh Bonneville (Paddington, The Monuments Men) brings a certain bonhomie to a man described as someone who “could charm a vulture off a corpse,” and Dickie and his wife, »

- MaryAnn Johanson

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Exclusive Interview: Director Gurinder Chadha talks about Viceroy’s House

1 March 2017 8:54 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Set at the time of Indian independence and the Partition, Viceroy’s House arrives in UK cinemas this Friday.  Director Gurinder Chadha took time off from promoting the film to talk to Flickering Myth’s Freda Cooper about why the film was such a personal project, and to share memories of the late Om Puri.

Fifteen years on from her breakthrough as a director, Bend It Like Beckham, Gurinder Chadha is drawing on family history for Viceroy’s House, set during the late 1940s when the Indian continent went through substantial change.  India itself achieved independence and the separate state of Pakistan was also founded.

Brought up with her grandmother’s stories of those days, the idea of making a film on the subject only took hold when Chadha appeared on Who Do You Think You Are?  “My ancestral homeland was in the foothills of the Himalayas, the part of »

- Freda Cooper

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Movie Review – Viceroy’s House (2017)

1 March 2017 7:30 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Viceroy’s House, 2017.

Directed by Gurinder Chadha.

Starring Hugh Bonneville, Gillian Anderson, Manish Dayal, Michael Gambon, Huma Qureshi, Lily Travers, Simon Callow, and Om Puri.

Synopsis:

Lord Mountbatten, as the last appointed Viceroy of India in 1947, is tasked with handing the country back to its people after 300 years of British imperial rule.  His and his family’s hopes for a smooth transition come under immense pressure as the traumatic reality of Partition becomes apparent.

Viceroy’s House is, at heart, a well-meaning and carefully balanced film about a particularly bloody chapter of India and Pakistan’s shared history – Partition. Director and screenwriter Gurinder Chadha, alongside her co-writers Moira Buffini and frequent collaborator Paul Mayeda Berges, has taken great pains to ensure a largely sympathetic re-telling of all sides of this history, but perhaps sacrifices some of the film’s bite in the process. It is, however, still an engaging and visually stunning piece of cinema. »

- Tori Brazier

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The Berlin International Film Festival and the European Film Market, Part 2

28 February 2017 7:09 AM, PST | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

As the film-business-crowds move through meetings designed to meet all sorts of movie-related objectives in this vast mix of people, and the movie-going public lines up for films in the Competition, Out-of-Competition, Panorama, Forum and Retrospectives; and families attend the Generation series, some for kindergarteners and others for preteens and some for those 14 and up, and as the constant exchange of ideas continues, there is lots of buzz, mostly positive about the Hungarian Competition film “On Body and Soul”.“On Body and Soul” by Ildikó Enyedi

Buzz continues the next day both pro and con about Oren Moverman’s Competition film, “The Dinner” which is definitely a must-see for each to decide on one’s own response to it. As Scott Roxborough in The Hollywood Reporter says, it “looks like just the political dish the times demand.” Produced by Caldecot Chubb, the script was originally to be written by Moverman for Cate Blanchett to direct. »

- Sydney Levine

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“Dividing people only leads to violence” – Gurinder Chadha on Viceroy’s House

28 February 2017 7:00 AM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Stefan Pape

When we saw Viceroy’s House in London, prior to the film’s world premiere out in Berlin, the director Gurinder Chadha (Bend it Like Beckham) introduced the film and when doing so, was almost reduced to tears. For this project represents a distinctly personal tale for the filmmaker, and when we sat down to discuss the film with Chadha ahead of its March 3rd release, she explained why.

It’s not a title that will resonate purely with Chadha though, nor just with Indians or Pakistanis, as it’s a remarkable pertinent tale – that works as a real comment on modern society.

“When we started making the film seven years ago, Obama was President of America, there was no Syrian refugee crisis, Brexit wasn’t an idea in anyone’s head and there certainly wasn’t a reality TV star in the white house,” she told us. »

- Stefan Pape

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Gurinder Chadha to Direct Film About a Female Indian Spy Set in WWII

15 February 2017 9:02 AM, PST | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Bend It Like Beckham” director Gurinder Chadha has announced her newest project. The Hindustan Times reports that Chadha is developing…

Continue reading on Women and Hollywood »

»

- Rachel Montpelier

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Viceroy’s House: Two sides of the story emerge in these new character posters

14 February 2017 6:05 AM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Zehra Phelan

Two new character posters have arrived for British drama, Viceroy’s House and we can’t help thinking they have a link to Valentine’s Day. With Gillian Anderson gazing lovingly at her Husband, Lord Mountbatten (Hugh Bonneville) on one side and the young lover’s, Jeet and Aalia cosying up to each other.

Related: Viceroy’s House Trailer and Poster

Viceroy’s House is set in a time where men were seen to rule their women and these posters depict this in a blatant manner with both Lord Mountbatten and Jeet in regal, honourable stances ever so slightly in front of the ladies. Even though fitting for the time, to portray this on promotional posters in the 21st century makes them feel dated. Oh and while we are here does anyone else, after watching our previous trailer post for Viceroy’s House, think Gillian Anderson has »

- Zehra Phelan

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Viceroy’s House review [Berlinale]: Dir. Gurinder Chadha (2017)

12 February 2017 11:45 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Viceroy’s House review: Gurinder Chadha co-writes and directs this massively intimate and indeed epic story at the time of partition and independence in 1947 India.

Viceroy’s House review by Paul Heath at the 2017 Berlin Film Festival.

Viceroy’s House review

Bend It Like Beckham and Angus, Thongs and Perfect Snogging director Gurinder Chadha brings Viceroy’s House, her most personal and ambitious project to cinema screens, a film debuting out-of-competition at the 2017 Berlin Film Festival, where it receives its world premiere.

The film is the true story of the 1947 handing over of power in India from the British Empire back to its people after three centuries of rule. Hugh Bonneville assumes the role of the last Viceroy of India, and indeed Queen Victoria’s great-grandson Lord Mountbatten, the man tasked with overseeing the transition. The motion picture, which is huge in scale, focusses its attention on the Partition of »

- Paul Heath

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Berlin Film Review: ‘Viceroy’s House’

12 February 2017 10:45 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

To begin at the very end, the closing credits of “Viceroy’s House” bear a detailed dedication to a woman who survived the devastating upheaval of the 1947 Partition of India, was forced to trek a vast distance from her home to the newly founded Muslim republic of Pakistan, and was finally reunited with her eventual husband in a refugee camp. The woman in question, it turns out, is director Gurinder Chadha’s grandmother, and her story is evidently a remarkable one — so one can’t help but wish that Chadha had elected to tell it directly in this stiff historical dramatization of events leading to the Partition. Instead, “Viceroy’s House” clumsily merges a waxworks biographical study of Lord Louis and Lady Edwina Mountbatten, the last Viceroy and Vicereine appointed to oversee the British handover of India, with a passionless Romeo-and-Juliet romance between two of their servants caught in the fray. »

- Guy Lodge

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'Viceroy's House': Film Review | Berlin 2017

12 February 2017 10:45 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

With the 70th anniversary of Indian independence looming, Viceroy's House is a timely dramatization of that tumultuous night in August 1947 when Britain finally surrendered the "jewel in the crown" of its rapidly imploding Empire. The Punjabi-British director Gurinder Chadha (Bend It Like Beckham) drew on true events from her own family history to create this semi-fictionalized period piece, which takes place in and around the magnificent 340-room palace in New Delhi that has served as India's seat of power for most of the last 100 years.

Premiering in Berlin this week ahead of its U.K. theatrical launch in March, »

- Stephen Dalton

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