Filmmaker Julia Pimsleur used to make up elaborate lies about her brother Marc, rather than explain that he had dropped out of college, turned his back on his Jewish heritage and moved to a... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Julia Pimsleur ...
Herself
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
...
Herself
Lucas Clark ...
Himself
Stan Koehler ...
Himself - Religious advisor
Michael O'Connell ...
Himself
Beverly Pimsleur ...
Herself
Marc Pimsleur ...
Himself
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Filmmaker Julia Pimsleur used to make up elaborate lies about her brother Marc, rather than explain that he had dropped out of college, turned his back on his Jewish heritage and moved to a Christian commune in Alaska. She and her mother initially feared that Marc had joined a cult. This documentary traces Julia's efforts to understand his conversion and to revive their relationship, despite her fundamentalist brother's disapproval of her bisexuality. Julia travels from New York City to her brother's religious community, where she and Marc search for common ground and discover the meaning of family. Written by Anonymous

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10 March 2001 (USA)  »

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Jew-Lia
Composed by Dennis Mitcheltree
Performed by the Dennis Mitcheltree Trio
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Moving documentary about a family coming together
13 June 2012 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Paul Pimsleur (of the language method) died when his son Marc was 10 and his daughter Julia was 8. This documentary film is set at a time when Marc is 32 and Julia 30 and they have been separated for a decade-- separated both physically (he in Alaska, she in New York) and ideologically (he a born again Christian, she bisexual). What I found remarkable about this film was how what seems to be the power of their desire to knit their 'little family' back together allows them establish a caring relationship in spite of their differences. The film also showed how Marc's religious experience and membership in a religious community helped him overcome what he acknowledged were serious psychological difficulties, without depriving him of the ability to respond warmly to his family. Although he might be characterized as ideologically rigid, it was moving to see that he was not a robot. The emotional depth (not to mention the beautiful scenes in Alaska) of this film make it well worth watching.


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