Two affluent suburban girls clash with the Latino gang culture of East Los Angeles.

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(story), (story) | 1 more credit »
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1 win & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Sam
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Eric
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Toby
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Chino
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Sasha
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Nick
Jose L. Vasquez ...
Manuel (as Johnny Vasquez)
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Ace
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Mr. Rubin
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Storyline

A pair of naive young girls learn that even the most insignificant actions can have lasting consequences. Influenced by the hip-hop thug lifestyle and seeking to explore life outside of their insulated, culturally homogenized suburb, pretty young teenagers Allison and Emily set their sights on East L.A. to experience the "gangsta" lifestyle firsthand. By the time the pair meet a ruthless Mexican drug dealer named Hector, some true-life Latino gang-bangers, and realize just how far out of their element they really are, it may already be too late to turn back. Written by Giancarlos Calderon

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Too much is never enough See more »

Genres:

Crime | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong sexual content, nudity, pervasive language, violence, drug and alcohol use - all involving teens | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

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Language:

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Release Date:

16 October 2005 (Armenia)  »

Also Known As:

The Powers That Be  »

Box Office

Budget:

$9,000,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (unrated)

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Allison is at the police station after the bust on the street, the girl talking to her in cell says, "...then the cop started asking me these really dumb questions, like what's closer to you now, the moon or Europe?" That question was asked to the co-writer of the movie, Stephen Gaghan, when he was detained by drug officers during his battle with drug addiction. The whole story can be found in a Newsweek article written by Stephen Gaghan. See more »

Goofs

When Allison is asking the boy shooting the film if he wants to sleep with her and begins seducing him, her pants go from buttoned to unbuttoned and back again. See more »

Quotes

Allison: We're teenagers and we're bored.
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Connections

Referenced in Savages (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Havoc
Written by Ainsworth Prasad and Evance Ambo
Performed by Fuze and Brainz Dimilo
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Havoc it is
5 December 2005 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

If there is some justice to misjudging investments in movies, then the fact that this film went directly to DVD despite the presence of a crew that includes some impressive names is notable. Writer Stephen Gaghan ('Traffic', 'Rules of Engagement', 'Syriana', etc) has composed a contrived script about rich, bored, Hip Hop imitating, unmotivated teenagers trying to spice up their insignificant lives by treading into the East LA 'danger zone', an experience from which they learn nothing about cross cultural ethnic groups and just return to Pacific Palisades whining about 'damaged goods'. It is an insulting story, one that stereotypes Hispanics as drug-peddling, raping thugs in a totally black and white manner, not taking into consideration the viewpoint of a cultural group's positive attributes and philosophies.

No longer a viable gimmick, the film begins with the tired cliché of a kid making a documentary about his friends, asking what they like and don't like, their goals, their outlooks. The fact that none of the interviewees has a clue about life, preferring to follow the current Hip Hop language (very poorly written) and focusing on sex, drugs, and escapes from their wealthy environments. Among these are three girls, the main character being Allison (Anne Hathaway, miscast in every way), who follow their superficial boyfriends on a joyride for drugs into East LA. There they meet Hector (Freddy Rodríguez, trying his best to create a character without the benefit of a decent script) who sells them drugs and whom Allison eyes. Allison is so shallow she doesn't have a clue about her motivations, just wanting something 'dangerous' to happen. She coaxes her equally clueless girlfriends into going into East LA to seduce Hector and ends up in a ridiculous barter for joining Hector's gang (no mention is made at all about the Chicanas who would never allow these three geeks to enter their territory unchallenged). The results of a barter results in an experience with which the girls cannot cope so they run back to the protection of the dysfunctional parents they loathe to cover the mess of their caper. Attempts to resolve this dumb story fail pathetically.

With so many fine Indie films that go begging for attention, it is a shame money is wasted on this sort of meaningless mess of a film. The 'unrated' designation is probably meant for the occasional nudity and gratuitous sex and language, but here 'Unrated' might just mean that the film is so without merit that it is non-classifiable. Avoid this one and don't think that a fine writer such as Gaghan guarantees a successful story. Grady Harp


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