6.8/10
700
24 user 7 critic

Australian Rules (2002)

In Prospect Bay, a remote outpost on the South Australian coast, two communities, the Goonyas and the Nungas, come together on the one field they have in common, the football field. But the... See full summary »

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Writers:

(screenplay), (novel) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
7 wins & 17 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Luke Carroll ...
Dumby Red
Lisa Flanagan ...
Clarence
...
Pickles
Simon Westaway ...
Bob Black
Celia Ireland ...
Kevin Harrington ...
Arks
...
Darcy
...
Pretty
Brian Torry ...
Glenn Bright
Max Fairchild ...
Big Mac
Eileen Darley ...
Shirl
Paul Simpson ...
Bar Regular
Denis Noble ...
Bar Regular
Kelton Pell ...
Tommy Red
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Storyline

In Prospect Bay, a remote outpost on the South Australian coast, two communities, the Goonyas and the Nungas, come together on the one field they have in common, the football field. But the underlying racism and class warfare threatens to make the team's greatest victories irrelevant. This holds particularly true for Blacky, a white teen who is more interested in books than sport, and his best friend, Dumby, the Aboriginal star of the team.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Play by the rules. Live by the rules. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance | Sport

Certificate:

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Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

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Release Date:

29 August 2002 (Australia)  »

Also Known As:

Afstralezikoi kanones  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$61,607 (Australia) (30 August 2002)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Blacky's dad makes a comment about him "rooting a gin". 'Root' is an Australian slang term for sex. 'Gin' is a term, now considered offensive, for an Australian Aboriginal woman. Its origin is from djin, the Eora aboriginal word for woman. The word was adopted by European settlers. See more »

Goofs

It is unclear whether the film has the same 1970s setting as the novel 'Deadly Unna?' upon which it is based. The three boys ride 70s style bikes but Teamman wears a World Cup 94 shirt, there is a newspaper featuring Pauline Hanson and there is a mention of Kylie Minogue who didn't become famous until the 80s. See more »

Quotes

Gary 'Blacky' Black: Old man's Fruit and Nut?
Liz Black: Old man's Fruit and f***ing nut
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Connections

Referenced in Outtakes (2003) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Aussie house proud film, that plays by dirty rules
17 September 2014 | by (adelaide, australia) – See all my reviews

Every time, this films on t.v. I watch it. This is one of those little gems, that you pass off or let slip away from viewing it. Okay, I'm South Aussie, and these locations used, intrigued me. I first put it down, the locations were closer to home. Then I thought, well may'be, they sat between Pt Lincoln and Ceduna. The hotel, and the old footy field, were somewhat familiar, locations used over on the Yorke. The location of Blackie's house was what I intrigued me the most. I'd say Fisherman's Bay. I was so right with the Yorke as I know Port Pearce between Balgowan and Port Victoria is aboriginal land. But getting on with the film, it's a simple forward story of race, prejudice, and truly robbing one black footballer, of a rightful win and trophy, on account of this undying problem, which catapults the black guy into madness, when stealing the trophy back on celebration night, from whence the tragic turn of story makes the last forty minutes, sit up and take note stuff. Luke Carroll was so powerful as the wronged of his win footballer, where Nathan Phillips wasn't bad as his mate Blackie. His mate Pickles, I hated. I've known a lot of punks like this, especially growing up, which the young actor gives a truly and magic touch to that intolerable character. Simon Westaway steals this film though as Blackie's abusive and very racist father, while Martin Vaughn is wasted as a hermit. Here's one of these eye catching films, with a simple moral and story, where unfortunately it's message, in this continuing day and age, is never changing. Neatly, well made quality, take note film.


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