IMDb > I'm Going Home (2001)
Je rentre à la maison
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I'm Going Home (2001) More at IMDbPro »Je rentre à la maison (original title)

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Overview

User Rating:
7.0/10   1,323 votes »
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Down 24% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Manoel de Oliveira (scenario and dialogue)
Jacques Parsi (scenario consultant: literature)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for I'm Going Home on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
8 June 2001 (Italy) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
The comfortable daily routines of aging Parisian actor Gilbert Valence, 76, are suddenly shaken when he learns that his wife... See more » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
4 wins & 2 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
20 films you must watch at Mumbai Film Festival 2012
 (From DearCinema.com. 27 September 2012, 2:14 AM, PDT)

User Reviews:
a funny, warm gem of a film. See more (23 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Michel Piccoli ... Gilbert Valence

Catherine Deneuve ... Marguerite

John Malkovich ... John Crawford, Film Director
Antoine Chappey ... George
Leonor Baldaque ... Sylvia
Leonor Silveira ... Marie
Ricardo Trêpa ... Guard
Jean-Michel Arnold ... Doctor
Adrien de Van ... Ferdinand

Sylvie Testud ... Ariel
Isabel Ruth ... Milkmaid
Andrew Wale ... Stephen
Robert Dauney ... Haines
Jean Koeltgen ... Serge
Mauricette Gourdon ... Guilhermine, the Housekeeper
Vania ... Organ Grinder
Jacques Parsi ... Friend of the Agent
Armel Monod ... Second Friend of the Agent
Jean Chicot ... Waiter
Christian Ameri ... Bistro Patron
Bruno Guillot ... Street Thug
Bernard Sanchez ... Bistro Patron Carrying Le Figaro
Jean-Luc Horvais ... Bistro Patron Carrying Le Monde
Nathalie Guéraud ... Agent's Secretary
Madame Duteil ... School Director
Catherine Trembloy ... Saleswoman at Art Store
Vina Hiridjee ... Autograph Seeker #1
Caroline Lavallée ... Autograph Seeker #2
Emmanuelle Fèvre ... Make-Up Woman
Philippe Mangin ... Hairdresser
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Robert Burns ... Equipe tournage Américaine
Marlon Courbin
Eddie Crew ... Equipe tournage américaine
Stephen Croce ... Equipe tournage américaine
Max Seide ... Equipe tournage américaine

Directed by
Manoel de Oliveira 
 
Writing credits
Manoel de Oliveira (scenario and dialogue)

Jacques Parsi (scenario consultant: literature)

Eugène Ionesco (play "Le roi se meurt")

William Shakespeare (play "The Tempest")

James Joyce (book "Ulysses")

Produced by
Paulo Branco .... producer
 
Cinematography by
Sabine Lancelin 
 
Film Editing by
Valérie Loiseleux 
 
Casting by
Marion Touitou 
 
Production Design by
Yves Fournier 
 
Costume Design by
Isabel Branco 
 
Makeup Department
Marie Combas .... key makeup artist
Emmanuelle Fèvre .... key makeup artist
Philippe Mangin .... key hair stylist
 
Production Management
Mohand Hadjlarbi .... unit manager
Alexandre Meliava .... unit production manager
Philippe Rey .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Olivier Bouffard .... assistant director
José Maria Vaz da Silva .... first assistant director
 
Art Department
Bernard Bridon .... property master
 
Sound Department
Jean-François Auger .... sound mixer
John Fewell .... sound effects editor
Henri Maïkoff .... sound
Yves-Marie Omnes .... boom operator
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Christian Magis .... gaffer
 
Music Department
Slovenská Filharmónia .... orchestra
 
Other crew
Júlia Buisel .... script supervisor
Marielle Duigou .... production assistant
 
Thanks
Marcel Bozonnet .... thanks
Daniel Jean .... thanks
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Je rentre à la maison" - France (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
90 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.66 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Le Figaro is considered a right-wing newspaper in France. Therefore, the Café scenes are a joke with the average conservative French man.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: From the 2nd to the 3rd Café scene, the headlines on both Le Figaro and Liberátion do not change, and it is supposed to be another day.See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
LOHENGRIN - Prélude (Vorspiel 1 Aufzug)See more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
6 out of 6 people found the following review useful.
a funny, warm gem of a film., 15 November 2001
Author: Creep Thunder from London, England

I like to think of myself as a movie buff, but I'm not. I am a novice, in training. I had never heard of Portuguese director Manoel de Oliveira but it turns out he is 93 years old, still active and has therefore been making films for most of the era of "talkie" cinema. So, "I'm Going Home". This is a film I would never have dreamed of going to see. I ended up at the cinema by default without realising that it would change my view on a lot of things and make me feel better without realising that I felt down.

I had no idea or preconceptions of what this would be like. The only person I was familiar with was John Malkovich (sp?) I'll get back to him later.

The film starts off with a play, and it's a play I would love to see. The audience (in the film) watching the play are enjoying it immensely and it is obvious that Gilbert Valence (the wonderful wonderful Michel Piccoli)is a well known stage actor, much loved by his French audience. Valence comes off stage to huge applause but then receives the worst kind of life-changing news.

Cuts to "some time later" We hear no dialogue from him until we see him in his next play. This is clever- unless he is on the stage, we only see him from an outsider's point of view. He is in a bar and we can see him talking and ordering but all we can hear is the white noise of Parisian traffic. And then vice-versa so for a while, he is always on the other side of the window to us.

He meets his agent who is a partonising, unsympathetic character. Valence doesn't understand why he keeps offering him roles he would never take. Valence feels out of sorts with society. His world has been reduced and he is surrounded by people he doesn't understand and whom in turn, don't understand him.

Enter John Malkovich. He is John Crawford a director of a Franco/American production company who desperately needs Valence to be in his new version of Ulysses (James Joyce you idiot!) (no, I've never read it either). His opening speech to Valence is a text book example of tactlessness and I wonder if M. de Oliveria has often found himself on the receivng end of the same, ageist treatment

My favourite scene is when Valence is trying his absolute hardest to get the part right. Malkovich is trying to keep his cool but is obviously getting infuriated with this poor frenchman who is trying to read an English-speaking part in an Irish accent (which he has three days to prepare for). The scene consists of a close-up of Malkovich's face as he winces and squirms, looks hopeful then despairs again, whilst we listen to the sound of Valence doing his best in a part that he wasn't born to play.

The film is full of so much apart from the story line and gives much food for thought on leaving the cinema. Is he really so out of sorts with the world? How can he be, when his grandson adores him completely and young girls find him very attractive (a fact that he finds hard to deal with)? Surely it is the bad side of modern society that he can't cope with in the same way the rest of us can barely cope either?

There are also shots in this picture that would make Martin Scorsese drool. I won't bother describing any because that never works, but if I noticed them, they must be good!

I probably make it sound like a melancholy old-duffer movie but it isn't. The dialogue is sharp and often very-funny, there are nice little sub-plots and elegant touches such as people drinking in sync with each other except for Valence. Subtle stuff that you have to watch out for.

I won't give the (abrupt, but for a reason) ending away but the way the title is used- it's something we can all relate to and wish we done ourselves!

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