Edit
The Ballad of Big Al (TV Movie 2000) Poster

(2000 TV Movie)

Goofs

Factual errors 

The Dryosaurus is shown having a hallux (innermost toe). The real animal lacked this.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Jump to: Continuity (5) | Miscellaneous (1) | Revealing mistakes (16)

Continuity 

Big Al's foot injury switches from being on his right foot to his left in the closeup of his foot, near the end of the episode.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The Ornitholestes in this episode produce a different sound than in the original series. The sounds used in this special are actually the high-pitched noises that the Dromaeosaur made. The other dinosaurs retained their original sound effects.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
As the female Allosaurus roars at Al, she opens her mouth wide, but in the immediate following shot, her mouth is only slightly opened.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The CGI Diplodocus (correctly) has a single claw on each of its front feet, the other four digits ending in stumps lacking claws. But the physical Diplodocus prop has sharp claws on each of its fingers.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The feet of Al's carcass change position between shots.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Miscellaneous 

During the hunting scene on the salt planes, at around the 18:27 mark, the two Diplodocus tails on the left side of the screen are twisting in the exact same pattern, which in reality would be very unlikely.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Revealing mistakes 

The animation error in which the teeth of the Diplodocus "stretch" as they open their jaws got carried over to this spin-off from the original Walking with Dinosaurs series.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When Al is hit by the neck of the sick Diplodocus, the tip of his tail passes through the neck.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
As Al swallows the lizard, its tail passes through his tongue.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When the female Allosaurus tackles Al to the ground and jumps over him, for a moment as a cloud of dust bursts up, she becomes transparent.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Near the end of the big Diplodocus hunt-scene, as the giant animal rears up on its hind legs, take a look at the second Allosaurus to run into view: it is actually transparent.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Near the beginning, when the mother Allosaurus and her chicks gather around a pool of water, you can see the reflections of trees through theirs, as if they were transparent.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When Big Al is considering attacking a mother Ornitholestes, his right arm juts out of place slightly as he scratches his head.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The shadow of the first Allosaurus we see eating the Diplodocus is animated badly, since it doesn't come into contact with the large chunk of meat it's pulling around with its mouth. Later, when it is approached by the giant female, the movements of the meat don't correctly correspond to the way the animal drags it.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The hind legs of the Allosaurus frequently "clip into" the base of their tail as they walk.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The feasting Allosaurus never cast a shadow on the Diplodocus carcass. The shadow of one Allosaurus actually goes underneath it. And when it lifts up the slab of meat in its mouth, the shadow of the meat seems to be floating on its own.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The plates of the dead Stegosaurus noticeably bend sideways. Since they are made of bone, this is quite unrealistic.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When the mother Ornitholestes turns aggressive, her feet in the dust cloud become see-through for a moment, then, as she lashes out towards Al, her shadow doesn't mimic the irregularity of the ground.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When the Allosaurus baby bumps into the camera lens, it turns its head to the side, but only the top portion of its neck and throat turn with it, the rest stay in place.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When Al gets up after having been knocked over by the Diplodocus, his left leg passes into his chest.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When the female Allosaurus appears and walks over to the Diplodocus carcass, her arm suddenly jerks out of place for a moment.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When the mother Allosaurus circles her nest, the bush behind her isn't disturbed even though her long tail should be touching it. If you look at the shadows, the shadow of the tail actually passes under the bush and reaches way beyond it.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Trivia | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page