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Gosford Park (2001)

The lives of upstairs guests and downstairs servants at a party in 1932 in a country house in England as they investigate a murder involving one of them.

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Writers:

, (based upon an idea by) | 1 more credit »
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3,932 ( 275)

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ON DISC
Won 1 Oscar. Another 31 wins & 73 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

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Storyline

Set in the 1930s, the story takes place in an old-fashioned English country house where a weekend shooting party is underway. The story centers on the McCordle family, particularly the man of the house, William McCordle. Getting on in years, William has become benefactor to many of his relatives and friends. As the weekend goes on, secrets are revealed, and it seems everyone, above stairs and below, wants a piece of William and his money, but how far will they go to get it? Written by Ashley <AMTOT@aol.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Tea At Four. Dinner At Eight. Murder At Midnight.

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Mystery

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some language and brief sexuality | See all certifications »

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Details

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Language:

Release Date:

18 January 2002 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Assassinato em Gosford Park  »

Box Office

Budget:

$19,800,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$1,567,041 (USA) (4 January 2002)

Gross:

$41,300,105 (USA) (31 May 2002)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

By her own admission, Kristin Scott Thomas was famously difficult on set whilst working on the film. In an interview with a British newspaper in 2005, she said that "when I did Gosford Park (2001) with Robert Altman, apparently I was a complete nightmare. I was very imperious and completely foul and horrible. And I had no idea I was doing it at all. Actually, that's not entirely true; I did wonder why people were giving me sideways looks, and there would be this odd hush whenever I walked into a room. The only explanation I could come up with was that I was half in character the whole time. I was playing this woman who was difficult and so I became difficult. But I did apologize to everyone afterwards." See more »

Goofs

In the dining room when George the footman tells Henry Denton to go elsewhere, Henry's hands are in his pockets, but in the next shot, as Henry leaves the room, his hands are at his sides. See more »

Quotes

Lord Stockbridge: [to Commander Meredith] When a man's as short as you are, it must be difficult to gauge the height of the birds.
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Crazy Credits

The cast credits at the end are separated between upstairs and downstairs. See more »

Connections

Featured in Siskel & Ebert: The Best of 2001 (2002) See more »

Soundtracks

The Way It's Meant to Be
(2001)
Sung by Abigail Doyle
Music by Patrick Doyle
Lyrics by Robert Altman & Abigail Doyle
© Air-Edel Associates Ltd.
By kind permission of Air-Edel Associates Ltd.
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

A review of a great film

Violence, mystery, sex, and murder, Gosford Park has it all. Director Robert Altman once again takes the Hollywood formula and gives a unique twist. The story begins when aristocrats during 1932 gather at Sir William McCordle's (Michael Gambon) estate for a shooting party. The guests are wealthy people with their trusty servants. People arrive at the McCordle estate two by two and the traditions begin. The servants set up dinner for their masters and the aristocrats begin their personal routines.

The story moves on as the characters begin to establish their names and the audience learns their varying social status. The intertwining stories among the guests begin to surface and the audience begins to realize there is much more in this house than what meets the eye.

During the night one member of the elite group is killed. None of the guests seemed to be fazed by this event and are only upset by the inconvenience it sets up for their lives.

The only one troubled is Constance, Countess of Trentham's maid, Mary (Kelly McDonald). The story begins to focus on Mary, who discovers secrets among the visitors and leads the audience to solve the mystery.

The great aspect about this film is Robert Altman's abilities to bring the past to life. He pays excellent attention to detail and is able to recreate the feelings and morals during the time period. He emerges the audience into a film world filled with history and story. Throughout the film Altman visually shows the audience the contrast between social classes through his various shots, lighting techniques, and camera filters. His fluid camera movements visually portray foreshadowing and relationship among characters. These elements give the audience a complete understanding of the mood and atmosphere in the film.

I recommend this movie to anybody who has the patience to sit and focus on this excellent film. Although the beginning is appropriately slow moving and the characters names are difficult to remember, the payoff is worth the efforts. This movie is made for active film viewers and all Robert Altman fans.


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