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Gosford Park (2001)

The lives of upstairs guests and downstairs servants at a party in 1932 in a country house in England as they investigate a murder involving one of them.

Director:

Writers:

, (based upon an idea by) | 1 more credit »
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ON DISC
Won 1 Oscar. Another 31 wins & 73 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Rupert Standish
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Storyline

Set in the 1930s, the story takes place in an old-fashioned English country house where a weekend shooting party is underway. The story centers on the McCordle family, particularly the man of the house, William McCordle. Getting on in years, William has become benefactor to many of his relatives and friends. As the weekend goes on, secrets are revealed, and it seems everyone, above stairs and below, wants a piece of William and his money, but how far will they go to get it? Written by Ashley <AMTOT@aol.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Tea At Four. Dinner At Eight. Murder At Midnight.

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Mystery

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some language and brief sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

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Language:

Release Date:

18 January 2002 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Assassinato em Gosford Park  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$19,800,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$395,162, 30 December 2001, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$41,308,615, 6 June 2002

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$87,754,044, 6 June 2002
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

There really was a Charlie Chan in London (1934) film made in 1934 and it was indeed a mystery set in an English manor house. While it did feature Alan Mowbray and Ray Milland, it was produced by John Stone, not Morris Weissman (a fictional character). See more »

Goofs

The movie takes place in 1932 but some of the songs Ivor Novello sings for the guests didn't come out until years after, like "Glamorous Night" (1935), "Why It Wasn't You" (1937), "I Can Give You a Starlight" (1939) and "Waltz of My Heart" (1939). See more »

Quotes

Lavinia Meredith: I don't care what's changed or not changed as long as our sons are spared what you all went through.
Lady Sylvia McCordle: Not all. You never fought, did you, William?
Sir William McCordle: I did my bit.
Louisa Stockbridge: Of course you did.
Lady Sylvia McCordle: Well, you made a lot of money but it's not quite the same as charging into the cannon's mouth, is it?
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Crazy Credits

Location filming at Syon House by kind permission of His Grace The Duke of Northumberland. See more »

Connections

References Upstairs, Downstairs (1971) See more »

Soundtracks

Keep the Home Fires Burning
(1915)
Sung by Jeremy Northam
Music By Ivor Novello
Lyrics by Lena Guilbert Ford
© Ascherberg Hopwood & Crew Limited
By kind permission of Warner/Chappell Music Ltd.
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

A Class Act
10 March 2002 | by See all my reviews

This is a lovingly crafted, beautifully acted ensemble piece set in an English Country House which is superficially a murder mystery. In reality, it is damning indictment of the class system and the level of servitude expected from those at the top of the tree from those that wait upon them.

What was surprising was the level of humour that Altman brings to what is, as it unfolds, a very sad story of transgression and loss. Maggie Smith has all the funniest lines as a viscious but impoverished woman who comes to her family with begging cap in hand. Those playing characters "above stairs" all look and sound the part and effortlessly give the impression of wealth and privelege and the callousness that breeds.

Many of the "downstairs" characters drive the story and there are some wonderfully wry performances from the likes of Richard E Grant and Alan Bates. As the moral centre of the film, Kelly McDonald is excellent and is well matched by Emily Watson as Emily and Clive Owen as Parkes. Ruling the downstairs troop is Helen Mirren whose cool visage hides a seething mass of emotion. A well deserved nomination here.

Only Robert Altman could assemble a cast of this magnitude and distinction and have many of them speak no more than a few lines ! Greats of English theatre like Derek Jacobi have small but memorable roles and there is not a bad note struck from any of the predominantly English cast.

I was slightly puzzled by the character played by Ryan Phillipe (although his perforamce was fine) but felt that the intrusion of two Americans into this English mix worked well to highlight the entrenched class roles played by everyone in the house.

Whilst perhaps not his best work, this is a very good Altman film - we move in and out of conversations whilst never losing their import and the cimematography has a fluidity that few other film makers can match.

A classy piece of film-making that rewards careful attention from the viewer.


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