IMDb > Time Out (2001) > Reviews & Ratings - IMDb
L'emploi du temps
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Reviews & Ratings for
Time Out More at IMDbPro »L'emploi du temps (original title)

Write review
Filter: Hide Spoilers:
Page 3 of 6: [Prev][1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [Next]
Index 60 reviews in total 

1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

Borrowed Time

9/10
Author: writers_reign
29 August 2008

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

The true story of a middle-aged man who lost his job but couldn't bring himself to confide in his wife/parents inspired two fine movies, Nicole Garcia's L'Adversaire and this one and if Garcia's has a slight edge that should not take anything away from this bleak, clinical study in which Aurelian Recoing finds the part of a lifetime and exploits it to the full. Karin Viard as his loving but increasingly bemused wife, Muriel, is the only 'name' in the cast by virtue of having played in several films shown outside France but Recoing has a long CV boasting mostly 'domestic' films and he has clearly learned his craft well. Cantet has chosen to shoot in stark, bleak settings and bleached the colour out of the film stock so that we get an impression of a gray, faceless individual, floating through a gray landscape with no colour on which to home in on and find his way out of the wood. Despite the long running time we are fully caught up in the non-story almost as hypnotically as Vincent himself. Excellent.

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

Excellent character observation

Author: MovieAddict2016 from UK
27 November 2004

I have little to say about "Time Out" other than that it is excellent and one of my favorite types of films: character studies. It's been said by some that "character movies" (Scorsese-style, etc.) were started by the Italians but the French seem to know how to do make a compelling character study as well. In this an honest businessman is laid off of his job and, too embarrassed and shamed to tell his family the truth, parades around pretending he's still fine - meanwhile, looking for a new job while he scams people out of money.

Overall, a really fine and entertaining film. The actors are all extraordinary and/or very good, the script is compelling. I just found the movie extremely entertaining. It's so fascinating and involving that I forgot I was reading subtitles after a while!

Highly, highly recommended.

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

The Sad and Bitter Face of the Unemployment in the Middle Age

8/10
Author: Claudio Carvalho from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
20 March 2004

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Vincent (Aurélien Recoing) is a middle age man who lost his job as investment consultant. He does not have courage to tell what happened to his wife and his family. Every day, he acts like in a normal working day, spending time driving all day long. He simulates meetings in other places and sleeps in his car parked in parking areas. Then, he informs his family that he quitted his job to work in a United Nations office in Switzerland, dealing with emergent markets in Africa. He borrows 200,000 French Francs from his father, pretending he will buy an apartment in Genevra for living there without spending money in rental. He advises his friends to invest their savings with him in emergent markets, promising very high interest rates. He gets all this money to support his fantasy. In order to avoid spoilers, I finish my summary in this point. This movie is excellent, unpredictable and never corny. The storyline is indeed an updated version of the 1924 F. W. Murnau's `The Last Laugh' (`Der Letzte Mann'), without the happy end of the original screenplay. Murnau shows an old man who lost his job of porter of a fancy hotel due to his advanced age. The loss of his uniform of porter symbolizes the loss of his self-esteem and the respect of his neighbors and friends. `L' Emploi du Temps' is also very real, and shows the sad and bitter face of the unemployment, specially in a middle age man. Vincent, performed by the excellent (and unknown) Aurélien Recoing, is very human and believable: a middle class man, having a beautiful family, a comfortable house, parents very proud of him, and suddenly loses his job, getting completely lost and without thinking clearly. He fights to preserve his self-esteem, trying to find motivation to start a new career again, using fantasy to simulate his life is still perfect. Although not recommended for all audience, it is very worthwhile watching this film. My vote is eight.

Title (Brazil): `A Agenda' (`The Agenda')

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

Engrossing, if you have the patience for it.

8/10
Author: mengel44 from Massachusetts
15 November 2003

It's not the masterpiece some seem to think it is, and I could understand why some people might turn off to it. I'm not a big fan of French cinema. It demands some patience and thought. I liked "Human Resources" better. But I found it very engrossing and convincing as a psychological study of the main character, and most interesting as commentary on the nature of work and the contagiousness of greed in our times. It is on target as social criticism; this story could have been located anywhere. The acting was solid; the cinematography very effective; and the music--well--appropriate. The ending, I must say, left me puzzled until I thought about it a bit--I found it somewhat disappointing in some ways. You be the judge.

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

Stunning French filmmaking

9/10
Author: Alex Kyrou from Vancouver, Canada
1 August 2002

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Time Out is not for your average movie viewer. Some will say it moves to slowly and ultimately doesn't lead anywhere. For those who like films to provide some character examination, this is for you. The lead character, Vincent, in a state of apparent denial, creates an illusionary job to avoid disappointment from his family and to help him deal with his job layoff.

The acting is superb (especially from lead Aurélien Recoing), the cinematography, at times, breathtaking. Highly recommended.

**** out of ****

SPOILER ------- Of particular interest is the final scene. Does the promise of the new job provide Vincent with hope, or is it, indeed, a return to the mundane lifestyle experienced 7 months earlier?

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

A piece of real life

8/10
Author: shaid from Amsterdam, The Netherlands
13 February 2002

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS* *MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS*

Vincent(Aurélien Recoing) has been fired from his job but he is afraid to tell this to his wife so he invent a job for himself and keep going with his daily routine as if he still works. When you read this description you may think that there is not much to do with such a story but surprisingly the film takes around 2 hours and it worth every minute of it. Vincent can be someone you know, the neighbor next door, someone from your family or even a close friend. This makes him close and familiar to you. You can identify with what happens to him. How he try to go on with his life without anyone knowing the truth. How he try to still be a good father for his children. And how difficult the whole situation is for him and the more the film progress the more it's getting complicated for him to keep the charade.

The strength of the film lies in 2 points. 1. Director Laurent Cantet keeps the focus on the story & on the human perspective. He let the story do the work for him. There are no fireworks here just a simple camera work. 2. Solid acting not to mention excellent one from the lead role and from all people around.

Go see this film. You will feel for what happens to Vincent and you will be on his side. It is a rewarding experience.

Was the above review useful to you?

2 out of 4 people found the following review useful:

"Beauty" doesn't necessarily involve "pretty"

9/10
Author: skytomm from Lake Norman (Mooresville), NC, USA
16 November 2004

This is a beautifully crafted and acted film that develops characters that I identified with all-too readily. We all know - and perhaps are - characters just like these in today's workaday, employee-as-cannon fodder world. So, what's so special about that? The story has the Faulkner-esquire quality of describing the large through the very small, microcosmic family portrayed here. Vincent's unwillingness to share his grief and his efforts to shield his family whom he loves dearly from his inner turmoil bespeaks a great strength that is plainly evident on the actor Aurélien Recoing's face. And his Muriel (Karin Viard) is just as wordlessly expressive and movingly credible.

This is not a happy film. This is not passive entertainment. L'employ du Temps is a terrific example of the filmmakers' and actors' art. See it, if you are serious about how film can stir your emotions.

Was the above review useful to you?

2 out of 4 people found the following review useful:

Among Best French films of the last 5 years

9/10
Author: Tilly Gokbudak from Roanoke, Va.
26 October 2004

I was quite impressed with this film, which I have wanted to see since I was at the Sundance Film Festival in Utah where/when it made its' North American debut. There have been many French films that have been critics' favorites over the last few years. But, aside "My Wife is An Actress," I was at least sligtly disappointed with many of them, ranging from "Irma La Vep" to "8 Women" (and "Jet Lag" was as inept as any Hollywood offering). But, "Time Out" really delivers. The opening scene where we the title character Vincent slumped over a car wheel as a school bus dumps the kids makes one thinks he is waiting on his child, but alas the child is at home. The scene also illustrates Vincent's double life and the reason he can not be the suburban father everyone thinks he is. The acting and direction in this film are quite crisp. It is also brilliantly edited. It is good to finally see a French film that lives up to high expectations. You will like this one.

Was the above review useful to you?

3 out of 6 people found the following review useful:

To be my own person, who sets the rules?

Author: Peegee-3 (poetsrx@webtv.net) from Santa Monica, CA
22 April 2002

Shakespeare spoke of the tangled web of deceit suggesting it was a terrible trap. Laurent Cantet presents us with another view. His hero in this film, Vincent (played to perfection by Aurelien Recoing) appears to revel in the freedom his dissembling brings...at least for a time. A middle-aged, middle class man who has lost his job keeps this information from his family and sets out on a complex journey of survival, both existentially and financially, involving schemes that he eventually has ambivalent feelings about. We also see another side to this complex man...the loving husband, father and son. Are we to judge and dislike this man? Should we cast the first stone?

I was particularly impressed by the subtle way Cantet depicted Muriel, Vincent's wife (performed with sensitivity and grace by Karin Viard). Her suspicions and uncertainties are written only on her lovely face...very little is ever said. And yet she's not seen as the long-suffering little woman...not at all. She appears independent and strong.

And then there's the affecting scenes in the snow-filled mountains... in that place of isolation (so representative of...well...of us all). There's majestic beauty and danger.

The mystery, the thought=provoking qualities of this film have made it for me a haunting and moving experience...One that I'd certainly recommend!

Was the above review useful to you?

3 out of 6 people found the following review useful:

Stupor of a salesman

Author: matthew wilder (cosmovitelli@mediaone.net) from los angeles
21 April 2002

Playing authority figures in dark suits, the actor Stellan Skarsgard always suggests a noble melancholy, a weatherbeaten soul underneath his Swedish-oil-exec good looks. William H. Macy has made a career out of essaying the disappointments of pride-in-professionalism white men. Aurelien Recoing, the hero of Laurent Cantet's L'EMPLOI DU TEMPS, doesn't summon the instant empathy we feel for those actors. Cantet is a schematist in the style of Arthur Miller: without Miller's cornballs, but also without his visceral punch. Recoing's very body seems to be a manifestation of Cantet's two-sided patness. From the front, Recoing has some of the bland, boyish-haired handsomeness of a Skarsgard or a young Klaus Maria Brandauer. From the back, balding and bearlike-hulking, Recoing is a monster or a wreck. Cantet's movies--old-school, slowly downhill-rolling tragedies about the inhumanity of late capitalism--use Jekyll-and-Hyde dichotomies for thudding dramatic effects.

Recoing's Vincent has lost his job as a management consultant. Instead of getting another one, he drives around, hangs out in office-building lobbies and hotel bars, and generally dresses and comports like an upper-middle-class Frenchman. When he starts dreaming up a fantasy job--bringing bucks to developing markets in the Third World via the U.N.--he starts taking money from all-too-eager friends to invest. Then a middle-class mobster is onto Vincent's scheme. And from there...before you can say FARGO, the cards come tumblin' down.

Like Cantet's last movie, HUMAN RESOURCES, we are meant to hate the game, not the player, and to believe that a rigged, soulless system has robbed Cantet's characters of their capacity to experience joy on earth. But what does this character want, exactly? At one moment, he seems to genuinely wish he had the idealistic U.N. job--something, at his stage of life, with his background in the for-profit world, he could never attain. At other moments he seems to want to drive around the snowy countryside and listen to golden oldies. At still others, he seems to enjoy, a la Kevin Spacey in AMERICAN BEAUTY, the undemanding work of selling hot stereos and toasters for his mafia friend. And yet Cantet has designed the movie to make it seem as if the need for status, for patriarchal prestige, has led Vincent into the fantasy land that is his undoing. The ending--a softer landing than you might be expecting--is meant to be soul-chilling.

But what's the big whip? Everyone has dreamed of a life of aimless rambling; those who have it never seem very happy with it. (Cantet could've tested his ideas if he had bought Vincent a ticket to a lazybones' paradise.) And Cantet underlines the irony that Vincent's hustling to keep himself in non-work is in itself a more than full-time job. Cantet's movies struggle for a Miller-like inevitability, but they always fail to persuade on a human level; his crushed heroes seem more constructs than creatures. One brilliantly observant (and shudder-inducingly cruel) moment: Vincent's wife catches on to his ruse when he brings a buddy from the office to dinner--a pockmarked hustler who is too low-class to inhabit the highflown world Vincent pretends to have a berth in. The jig is up for Vincent because his wife's snob meter goes off. Too bad nothing else is as acutely examined or observant.

Was the above review useful to you?


Page 3 of 6: [Prev][1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [Next]

Add another review


Related Links

Plot summary Ratings Awards
External reviews Plot keywords Main details
Your user reviews Your vote history