IMDb > Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures (2001)
Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures
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Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures (2001) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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Plot:
The career and life of Stanley Kubrick is explored through pictures, clips from his films, his old home movies, comments from his colleagues and a narration by Tom Cruise. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
2 wins & 2 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
Inside Kubrick See more (36 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Stanley Kubrick ... Himself (archive footage)
Barbara Kroner ... Herself, Stanley Kubrick's sister
Steven Marcus ... Himself, professor, Stanley Kubrick's schoolfriend
Alexander Singer ... Himself (as Alex Singer)

Paul Mazursky ... Himself
Irene Kane ... Herself (as Chris Chase)
Sybil Taylor ... Herself
James B. Harris ... Himself

Marie Windsor ... Herself

Richard Schickel ... Himself

Christiane Kubrick ... Herself

Peter Ustinov ... Himself (as Sir Peter Ustinov)
Louis C. Blau ... Himself
Anthony Frewin ... Himself
Alex Cox ... Himself

Woody Allen ... Himself
Paul Lashmar ... Himself

John Calley ... Himself

Ken Adam ... Himself

Sydney Pollack ... Himself

Arthur C. Clarke ... Himself
Brian Aldiss ... Himself

Douglas Trumbull ... Himself (as Doug Trumbull)

Keir Dullea ... Himself
Tony Palmer ... Himself
György Ligeti ... Himself

Jack Nicholson ... Himself
Anya Kubrick ... Herself

Malcolm McDowell ... Himself

Alan Parker ... Himself
Leon Vitali ... Himself

Terry Semel ... Himself
Ed Di Giulio ... Himself

Allen Daviau ... Himself

Milena Canonero ... Herself

Steven Berkoff ... Himself

Shelley Duvall ... Herself
Wendy Carlos ... Herself
Katharina Kubrick ... Herself (as Katharina Kubrick-Hobbs)
Mike Herrtage ... Himself
Margaret Adams ... Herself

Michael Herr ... Himself

Matthew Modine ... Himself
Philip Hobbs ... Himself
Douglas Milsome ... Himself (as Doug Milsome)
Alan Yentob ... Himself

Nicole Kidman ... Herself

Tom Cruise ... Himself, also narrator
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Martin Scorsese ... Himself

Steven Spielberg ... Himself

Jan Harlan ... Himself (uncredited)
Vivian Kubrick ... Herself (archive footage) (uncredited)

Directed by
Jan Harlan 
 
Produced by
Anthony Frewin .... associate producer
Jan Harlan .... producer
 
Cinematography by
Manuel Harlan 
 
Film Editing by
Melanie Viner-Cuneo 
 
Sound Department
Nigel Galt .... sound supervisor
Manuel Harlan .... sound
Graham V. Hartstone .... re-recording mixer
Brendan Nicholson .... re-recording mixer
Tom Gambale .... sound post-production (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Ken Morse .... camera operator: rostrum camera
 
Editorial Department
Nick Adams .... colorist
Alan Jones .... on-line editor
Claus Wehlisch .... assistant editor: avid
 
Other crew
Katie Barget .... transcriptions
Marianne Bower .... picture researcher
Andrea Cunnington .... transcriptions
Camille DeBiase .... picture researcher
Nick Frewin .... computer supporter
Tom Gambale .... picture researcher
Vivian Kubrick .... additional footage
 
Thanks
Tony Lawson .... thanks
Martin Short .... special thanks
 
Crew believed to be complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
142 min
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Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
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Did You Know?

Quotes:
[Last lines]
Christiane Kubrick:...and he'd say, "I'm still fooling them!"
See more »
Movie Connections:
Features The Shining (1980)See more »

FAQ

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4 out of 4 people found the following review useful.
Inside Kubrick, 30 November 2007
Author: virek213 from San Gabriel, Ca., USA

Hollywood has often had a difficult time dealing with ambiguity and enigmas. And there have been very few directors who define those terms much better than the late Stanley Kubrick. That aspect, and many others, are the focus of the incredible intriguing 2001 documentary STANLEY KUBRICK: A LIFE IN PICTURES, directed by Kubrick's brother-in-law (and frequent co-producer) Jan Harlan.

In its 142-minute running time, the film, narrated by Tom Cruise, charts Kubrick's progress from his early days as a photographer in the Bronx to his earliest efforts at film-making (1953's FEAR AND DESIRE; 1955's KILLER'S KISS), and how each new film helped to revolutionize Hollywood at a time when the old studio system was now starting to crumble. But as even a successful big-budget effort like SPARTACUS shows, Kubrick was never one who could simply kowtow to the whims of studio executives. He needed complete creative control over every film he made from that point on, and he didn't feel that he could do that in Hollywood. In a radical move, he moved himself, his family, his life, and his work to England in 1960 and never set foot on American soil again, apart from a few scattered occasions. But he always considered himself an American filmmaker first and foremost.

Beginning with LOLITA in 1962, and continuing right up to the last film, EYES WIDE SHUT, in 1999, Kubrick chose material and subject matter that most other directors would never have thought of touching with a barge pole. His way of doing films, a process that often took years on end (hence the relatively small number of films to his credit), was often seen as cold, clinical, and detached, which tended to rub critics the wrong way. On other occasions, however, his films were often controversial. LOLITA was considered quite scandalous because of its depiction of forbidden love. The reviews for 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY were initially extremely bad because of that film's revolutionary approach to science fiction. DOCTOR STRANGELOVE was frequently slammed for its savagely satirical approach to nuclear war and Cold War-era politics. A CLOCKWORK ORANGE spawned a firestorm because of its explicit and whimsical approach to sex, violence, and governmental brainwashing. And even THE SHINING, regarded as one of the great horror films of all times in most quarters now, still remains a bone of contention for others because of its ambiguities and the fact that it strayed so far from its Stephen King source material.

But Kubrick remained largely above it all by being deeply committed to his family and friends, as this documentary also shows, utilizing film footage that the outside world had never seen up to that point. Kubrick rarely gave interviews; he was an intensely private man (though not at the Howard Hughes level like so many pundits might claim); and he could be extremely exacting with the actors he worked with (witness Shelley Duvall's own trauma on THE SHINING). Directors like Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, Alex Cox, and Woody Allen all share their impressions of Kubrick's cinematic mastery; while actors like Malcolm McDowell, Sir Peter Ustinov, Jack Nicholson, and Matthew Modine share their impressions of working so closely with the man.

All of this adds up to a great film, one that can never answer all the questions about its subject simply because those questions may not have answers that will satisfy everyone, if anyone at all. But no matter how he was regarded by critics or audiences while he was alive, Stanley Kubrick remains one of the most important directors in cinematic history; and this documentary sets the case for that claim in solid stone.

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