We Were Soldiers
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guide
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

8 items from 2017


‘The Vietnam War’ Recommended Reading List: From ’The Things They Carried’ to ‘The Sacred Willow’

29 September 2017 12:53 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s “The Vietnam War” has been an 18-hour journey into understanding decades of trauma and loss that still affect Americans today. Even though more then 40 years have passed, emotions still run deep about that conflict.

During a Television Critics Association press tour panel for “The Vietnam War” in July, retired General Merrill McPeak spoke passionately about his view on the war.

Read More:‘The Vietnam War’ Filmmaker on the Horrifying Execution Footage That’s ‘Unbearable to Look At’

“I’ve heard it argued that we never lost a military engagement in Vietnam. We just lost the war,” he said. “I’ve not been back to Vietnam. I’m a poor loser… I’m not sure I’ll ever go to Vietnam. Many, many veterans do, and they’re warmly received. It’s a wonderful relationship we have with the Vietnamese now. It’s great. I celebrate it. »

- Hanh Nguyen

Permalink | Report a problem


‘The Vietnam War’ Recommended Reading List: From ’The Things They Carried’ to ‘The Sacred Willow’

29 September 2017 12:53 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s “The Vietnam War” has been an 18-hour journey into understanding decades of trauma and loss that still affect Americans today. Even though more then 40 years have passed, emotions still run deep about that conflict.

During a Television Critics Association press tour panel for “The Vietnam War” in July, retired General Merrill McPeak spoke passionately about his view on the war.

Read More:‘The Vietnam War’ Filmmaker on the Horrifying Execution Footage That’s ‘Unbearable to Look At’

“I’ve heard it argued that we never lost a military engagement in Vietnam. We just lost the war,” he said. “I’ve not been back to Vietnam. I’m a poor loser… I’m not sure I’ll ever go to Vietnam. Many, many veterans do, and they’re warmly received. It’s a wonderful relationship we have with the Vietnamese now. It’s great. I celebrate it. »

- Hanh Nguyen

Permalink | Report a problem


Shiloh Child Star Blake Heron Found Dead at 35

8 September 2017 3:19 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Blake Heron, who played Marty Preston in 1996’s Shiloh, has died at the age of 35, his rep confirms to People.

The former actor’s girlfriend found him dead at his Los Angeles area home on Friday morning, law enforcement tells TMZ. He was reportedly pronounced dead at the scene, after paramedics failed to revive him.

TMZ reports that Heron had been sick over the last few days, but had also previously battled heroin addiction and had recently completed rehab.

However, the website notes that EMTs found no illegal drugs on the scene, only prescription flu medication. Sources tell the outlet »

- Mike Miller

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Shiloh’ Star Blake Heron Dies at 35

8 September 2017 3:05 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Blake Heron, who gained fame as a teen actor during the 1990s, has died at his home in La Crescenta, Calif. He was 35.

The Los Angeles County Department of Medical Examiner-Coroner and his former manager confirmed his death. Heron was found unresponsive at his residence on Friday morning. Paramedics pronounced him dead at the scene. His cause of death has not been determined yet.

Heron was discovered by a friend who told authorities that he had been sick with the flu for the last few days.

Related

Celebrities Who Died in 2017

Heron, a native of Sherman Oaks, Calif., made his film debut in the 1995 Disney movie “Tom and Huck,” playing Ben Rodgers, and in the TV series “Reality Check” as Bud McNeight. In 1996, he starred in the Warner Bros. family drama “Shiloh,” portraying an adolescent who rescues an abused hunting dog in a small town. Michael Moriarty, Ann Dowd, and Scott Wilson co-starred in the pic. The »

- Dave McNary

Permalink | Report a problem


'Shiloh' Star Blake Heron Dead at 35

8 September 2017 2:24 PM, PDT | TMZ | See recent TMZ news »

9:07 Pm P.T. -- Cops say Heron died of an apparent illicit substance overdose...First responders attempted to revive the actor with Narcan, but life saving measures were ineffective. Blake Heron, the actor who played Marty Preston in the 1996 movie, "Shiloh," is dead ... TMZ has learned. Law enforcement tells TMZ, Heron's girlfriend went to his L.A. area home Friday morning and found him dead. Paramedics worked on Heron for 40 minutes trying to revive him, »

- TMZ Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


5 Untrue Things you Believe about War because of Movies

20 June 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | TVovermind.com | See recent TVovermind.com news »

“War, huh, good God What is it good for? Absolutely nothing, listen to me!” Those lyrics from Norman Whitfield’s 1970 song “War” pretty much sums up how most of the population feels about it. This perception colored in by theatrical depictions of warfare. Through movies like “Saving Private Ryan” and “We Were Soldiers” we’ve gotten to gaze at the horrors of battle from a distance… But what if I told you the movies aren’t telling the truth? A film director’s goal is to captivate and create a movie that has resonance. To do that they often stretch the truth and

5 Untrue Things you Believe about War because of Movies »

- Matt Clark

Permalink | Report a problem


Lt. Gen. Hal Moore, Depicted in 'We Were Soldiers,' Dies at 94

12 February 2017 5:53 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Retired Lt. Gen. Harold G. "Hal" Moore, the American hero known for saving most of his men in the first major battle between the U.S. and North Vietnamese armies, has died. He was 94.

Joseph Galloway, who with Moore co-authored the book We Were Soldiers Once ... and Young, confirmed Saturday to the Associated Press that Moore died late Friday in his sleep at his home in Auburn, Ala.

Galloway said Moore, his friend of 51 years, died two days shy of his 95th birthday.

"There's something missing on this earth now. We've lost a great warrior, a great soldier, »

- the Associated Press

Permalink | Report a problem


Gen. Hal Moore Dies: Life Depicted In Randall Wallace-Mel Gibson Film ‘We Were Soldiers’

12 February 2017 3:23 PM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Gen. Hal Moore, the decorated Army chief whose life was depicted in the 2002 Vietnam film We Were Soldiers based on his own book, has died. He was 94. The film, written and directed by Randall Wallace and starring Mel Gibson as Moore, told the story of the Battle of Ia Drang. The war drama was released by Paramount and grossed $114.6 million worldwide. “I absolutely love that man,” said Wallace of his friend. “He taught me great things. He had so many ways of teaching in… »

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

8 items from 2017


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners