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Nicole Kidman’s Best Performances — IndieWire Critics Survey

Nicole Kidman’s Best Performances — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of “The Killing of a Sacred Deer,” what is Nicole Kidman’s greatest performance?

Vadim Rizov (@VRizov), Filmmaker Magazine

I don’t know about “best” — I haven’t seen an embarrassing chunk of what are considered her most significant roles, and I’m weak on understanding acting — but the performance that sticks most in my mind (quite possibly because I saw it at impressionable high school age) is “Dogville.” Kidman is spookily withdrawn, like an observer alien in a human body dropped into a moral wasteland which she attempts to navigate with understanding and decorum until finally it’s just too much. As in “Birth,
See full article at Indiewire »

Lars von Trier Denies Bjork’s Sexual Harassment Allegations

Lars von Trier Denies Bjork’s Sexual Harassment Allegations
Lars von Trier, who worked with Bjork on the 2000 film “Dancer in the Dark,” has responded to accusations the singer made over the weekend about being sexually harassed by an unnamed Danish film director.

“It was extremely clear to me when I walked into the actresses profession (sic) that my humiliation and role as a lesser sexually harassed being was the norm and set in stone with the director and a staff of dozens who enabled it and encouraged it,” she wrote in a Facebook post. “When I turned the director down repeatedly, he sulked and punished me and created for his team an impressive net of illusion where I was framed as the difficult one. Because of my strength, my great team, and because I had nothing to loose (sic) having no ambitions in the acting world, I walked away from it and recovered in a years time.”

Von Trier denied the allegations on Monday, telling
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Björk's "Danish Director" Statement

Björk's
By Nathaniel R

Catherine Deneuve, Björk, and Von Trier at Cannes (2000)

The floodgates have opened post Weinstein and now everyone wants to speak out. This morning Björk issued a statement about her experience working with "a Danish director," a hilariously coy non-naming of names since she's only starred in one movie, Lars von Trier's Dancer in the Dark (2000) after which she never appeared in a movie again, unless you count her performance art collaboration with her then-boyfriend Matthew Barney on Drawing Restraint (2009). Which, well, the sexual violence was onscreen in that one with Barney and Björk carving each other up while naked underwater and turning into whales or some such. You know how that happens.

Here is her statement which is worth parsing due to its unexpected Dogville allusion...
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘First They Killed My Father’ Review: Angelina Jolie’s Cambodian Drama Is Her Best Film

‘First They Killed My Father’ Review: Angelina Jolie’s Cambodian Drama Is Her Best Film
“First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers” is the movie that Angelina Jolie has been working toward for the duration of her short filmmaking career. With each directing effort, Jolie has dismantled any semblance of the glossy stardom that burdens her reputation. Her slick 2011 debut “In the Land of Blood and Honey” was a grim tale of star-crossed lovers set against the Bosnian war, while 2014’s survival saga “Unbroken” had the scope and visceral intensity of a WWII epic. “By the Sea” was an uneven expressionistic romance in which she co-starred alongside then-husband Brad Pitt, but it hardly glamorized the couple’s insular world.

Now comes a more focused, involving work than any of her earlier efforts, a taut wartime tale about surviving the Khmer Rouge that’s rooted in a child’s perspective rather than a simplistic, westernized gaze. Despite a few missteps, it’s the
See full article at Indiewire »

Turkey’s Newest: ‘Grain’ in Competition at Sarajevo Film Festival

Turkey’s Newest: ‘Grain’ in Competition at Sarajevo Film Festival
Academy Nominated and Berlin Golden Bear Winner (Bal/ Honey), Director Semih Kaplanoğlu’s new feature, Grain (Isa: The Match Factory), starring Cristina Flutur, Jean-Marc Barr and Ermin Bravo will have its world premiere in the competition program at the Sarajevo Film Festival August 11–18.

Watch the trailer here.

Besides the screening of Grain costarring Ermin Bravo, Bravo is also starring in another screening at the Sarajevo Film Festival, Men Don’t Cry, directed by Alen Drljevic. This film won just the Special Jury Prize at Karlovy Vary International Film Festival.

Sarajevo Film Festival Competition Red CarpetErmin Bravo

Watch the trailer of Men Don’t Cry here.

Jean-Marc Barr is known for Lars van Trier’s films Dogville, Breaking the Waves, Nymphomaniac, and Europa. He has also just finished shooting for Cellar, directed by Igor Voloshin.

Jean-Marc Barr

Cristina Flutur is best-known for playing Alina in the movie Beyond the Hills (2012), directed
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Chloë Sevigny and Her Mom Don’t Talk About ‘The Brown Bunny,’ and 7 Other Wild Stories From the Indie Actress’ Career

Chloë Sevigny and Her Mom Don’t Talk About ‘The Brown Bunny,’ and 7 Other Wild Stories From the Indie Actress’ Career
Few acting resumes include as many visionary, boundary-pushing auteur filmmakers as Chloë Sevigny’s. A selected list of the directors she’s worked with could easily fill an IndieWire top ten: Harmony Korine, Vincent Gallo, Lars Von Trier, Whit Stillman, Kimberly Peirce, Olivier Assayas, and David Fincher — to name a few. In fact, as IndieWire co-founder Eugene Hernandez put it at a sit-down with the actress at the Provincetown International Film Festival last weekend, Sevigny was at the epicenter of the independent film renaissance of the late 1990s and early 2000s that inspired IndieWire’s creation in the first place.

Read More: Why Chloe Sevigny Waited 20 Years To Make Her Directorial Debut With The Female-Friendly ‘Kitty

“It was the work of Chloe and so many of her collaborators…that inspired the site we created. So without even knowing it, Chloe, you were part of what helped inspire us to do what we did at IndieWire,” said Hernandez in his introduction.

Sevigny was in Provincetown showing her short film, “Kitty,” the actress’ first foray into directing. It’s a visually lush and fantastical film based on a short story by Paul Bowles, whose work once led her to travel to Marrakech with Korine in the mid-’90s, “Just kind of following in his footsteps.” As the festival presented her with their Excellence in Acting Award, Sevigny and Hernandez sat down for a career-spanning talk that included some eyebrow-raising anecdotes from her days working with indie cinema’s most lauded (and eccentric) directors.

Read More: Sofia Coppola On Female Sexuality In ‘The Beguiled’ And Why She Hopes Gay Men Find Colin Farrell Sexy

Here are seven things you may not have known about Sevigny’s most memorable films, and some of the greatest (and most controversial) indies of the last twenty years, according to her:

1. Before “Boys Don’t Cry,” Drew Barrymore wanted to play Brandon Teena, and she asked Harmony Korine to direct it.

Drew Barrymore had actually approached Harmony and she wanted to play [Brandon Teena] and she wanted me to play Lana in her version. There were some weird initial meetings around that, which obviously didn’t go very far. She sent in these kind of Herb Ritts photos of herself done up as a boy. She looked really attractive, but it wasn’t gonna work. And then I actually went and auditioned for the [Brandon Teena] part. Kimberly Peirce said, ‘You’ve never wanted to be a boy, have you?’ And I said, ‘No,’ and she was like, ‘Why don’t you come back in and try out for the other part?’ So I did, and I got it.”

2. Sarah Polley was Kimberly Peirce’s first choice to play Lana in “Boys Don’t Cry.”

“I only got the part because Sarah Polley passed. That happened to me a lot in the ’90s. She got a lot of parts that I wanted.”

3. The reaction to that infamous blow job scene in Vincent Gallo’s “The Brown Bunny” still haunts her.

“I thought it would just kind of play to an art house audience, I don’t know why I thought it would just go under the radar. Vincent’s a real character. I love ‘Buffalo 66.’ I put my faith in him, believed in him. He’s also very seductive, as you can imagine… I think it was a way of kind of reclaiming myself, which sounds odd, but after the celebrity and stuff, being like: ‘No, that’s not who I am, I’m this other thing, and this is what I stand for.’ Or wanting to push the envelope. Like John [Waters], who’s here.” Sevigny gestured to Waters, who called out from the audience: “I loved the ‘The Brown Bunny’! The insects on the windshield…”

Read More: ‘Lizzie’: First Look at Kristen Stewart and Chloe Sevigny in Gothic Historical Murder Mystery

4. “The Brown Bunny” didn’t hurt her career, but it did hurt some relationships.

“I got my first studio film after that. I’d never been offered a studio film. It was ‘Zodiac.’ I don’t think it really hurt me, necessarily. I mean, it hurt me, in a lot of ways… Some relationships have had trouble with it. Of course, my mom and I don’t talk about it.”

5. Whit Stillman is terrifying.

“He’s very precise, and he also likes to do things a lot… It becomes surreal. Not as much as Fincher — he does full takes. Whit just wants you to say one line or one word again and again and again in a series. It’s terrifying. So scared of that man. And yet I keep going back. Glutton for punishment.”

6. Lars Von Trier spanked her on the set of “Dogville” (often).

“I think that Lars tortures the main actresses, and the supporting players get a free ride. He was really into spanking me. But in a playful way. He’d always tease me, like I had to be punished. And he knew I was into Black metal so he was always teasing me about like going off and burning churches. We had a funny rapport. But I think he was harder on Nicole [Kidman].”

7. The Chloe videos hurt her feelings.

“Ugh, I have a really complicated relationship with those. I don’t want to say I’m offended, ’cause that’s such a strong word. But I don’t enjoy them. I think because he’s a comedian. If he was more of a drag performer, I would feel like less – they hurt my feelings. Maybe I should be tougher, I don’t know. But they do.”

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See full article at Indiewire »

J. Hoberman’s Best Movies of the 21st Century

There have been a lot of lists about the best films of the 21st century. IndieWire has been digging through the last two decades one genre at a time; meanwhile, the New York Times’ top movie critics provided their own takes. J. Hoberman, the longtime Village Voice film critic who now works as a freelancer, decided to join the fray. Here’s his take, also available at his site, and republished here with permission.

People have been asking me, so I thought I might as well join (or crash) the party initiated by the New York Times and put in my two cents regarding the 25 Best Films of the 21st Century (so far). I don’t see “everything” anymore and I haven’t been to Cannes since 2011.

There is some overlap but this is not the same as the proposed 21-film syllabus of 21st Century cinema included in my book “Film After Film.” Those were all in their way pedagogical choices. Begging the question of what “best” means, these are all movies that I really like, that I’m happy to see multiple times, that are strongly of their moment and that I think will stand the test of time.

My single “best” film-object is followed by a list of 11 filmmakers and one academic production company (in order of “best-ness”) responsible for two or more “best films,” these followed by another eight individual movies (again in order) and finally four more tentatively advanced films (these alphabetical). I’m sure I’m forgetting some but that’s the nature of the beast.

Christian Marclay: “The Clock

Lars von Trier: “Dogville” & “Melancholia” (and none of his others)

Hou Hsiao Hsien: “The Assassin” & “Flight of the Red Balloon

Jean-Luc Godard: “In Praise of Love” & “Goodbye to Language”

David Cronenberg: “Spider,” “A History of Violence,” “Eastern Promises,” & “A Dangerous Method

David Lynch: “Mulholland Drive” & “Inland Empire

Ken Jacobs: “Seeking the Monkey King,” “The Guests” (and more)

Cristi Puiu: “The Death of Mr Lazarescu” & “Aurora

Chantal Akerman: “No Home Movie” & “La Captive” (assuming that 2000 is part of the 21st Century)

Paul Thomas Anderson: “The Master” & “There Will Be Blood

Kathryn Bigelow: “The Hurt Locker” & “Zero Dark Thirty

Alfonso Cuarón: “Gravity” & “Children of Men

Sensory Ethnology Lab: “Leviathan,” “Manakamana,” & “People’s Park”

“The Strange Case of Angelica” — Manoel de Oliviera

“Corpus Callosum” — Michael Snow

“West of the Tracks” — Wang Bing

“Carlos” — Olivier Assayas

“Che” — Steven Soderbergh

“Ten” — Abbas Kariostami

“Russian Ark” — Aleksandr Sokurov

“The World” — Jia Zhangke

Citizenfour” — Laura Poitras

Day Night Day Night” — Julia Loktev

“Once Upon a Time in Anatolia” — Nuri Bilge Ceylan

Wall-e” — Andrew Stanton

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See full article at Indiewire »

How ‘Big Little Lies’ (and Improvised Sex Scenes) Turned Alexander Skarsgård Into an Awards Contender — Career Watch

How ‘Big Little Lies’ (and Improvised Sex Scenes) Turned Alexander Skarsgård Into an Awards Contender — Career Watch
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors. In this edition we tackle Alexander Skarsgård, who’s advancing his career with a canny combo of studio movies, indie films, and premium television.

Bottom Line: You never know where you stand with Skarsgård, who has the complexity of a character actor beneath the leading-man looks that launched a thousand memes. (Reads one: “Research shows that if you’re afraid of spiders, you are more likely to find one in your bedroom… I’m really afraid of Alexander Skarsgård.”)

His muscular swagger and danger is on display in “The Legend of Tarzan,” but his tender attentions to wife Jane (Margot Robbie) were that film’s throbbing heart. And in the hugely popular and topical HBO drama series “Big Little Lies,” he holds his own with an ensemble of powerful women including executive producer Nicole Kidman, who performs an
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

How ‘Big Little Lies’ (and Improvised Sex Scenes) Turned Alexander Skarsgård Into an Awards Contender — Career Watch

How ‘Big Little Lies’ (and Improvised Sex Scenes) Turned Alexander Skarsgård Into an Awards Contender — Career Watch
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors. In this edition we tackle Alexander Skarsgård, who’s advancing his career with a canny combo of studio movies, indie films, and premium television.

Bottom Line: You never know where you stand with Skarsgård, who has the complexity of a character actor beneath the leading-man looks that launched a thousand memes. (Reads one: “Research shows that if you’re afraid of spiders, you are more likely to find one in your bedroom… I’m really afraid of Alexander Skarsgård.”)

His muscular swagger and danger is on display in “The Legend of Tarzan,” but his tender attentions to wife Jane (Margot Robbie) were that film’s throbbing heart. And in the hugely popular and topical HBO drama series “Big Little Lies,” he holds his own with an ensemble of powerful women including executive producer Nicole Kidman, who performs an
See full article at Indiewire »

Why Nicole Kidman Is a Full-Fledged Badass, Even Before ‘Big Little Lies’ — Career Watch

Why Nicole Kidman Is a Full-Fledged Badass, Even Before ‘Big Little Lies’ — Career Watch
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Nicole Kidman, who’s having something of a renaissance moment.

Bottom Line: Nicole Kidman is one of our most fearless actresses. She’s an Oscar perennial who constantly chases challenging material, edginess be damned. Yes, her most recent nomination stemmed from a very mild-mannered role as Dev Patel’s mother in the true-life Australian drama “Lion,” but for Kidman’s career it’s her exceptions that prove the rule.

She broadened her fanbase by producing, with Reese Witherspoon, the hugely popular and topical HBO drama series “Big Little Lies,” in which she co-starred as Celeste Wright, an elegant Monterey mom trapped in a sadomasochistic power struggle of spousal abuse with her husband Perry (Alexander Skarsgard). Critics’ raves and audience reaction will likely push Kidman to
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Why Nicole Kidman Is a Full-Fledged Badass, Even Before ‘Big Little Lies’ — Career Watch

Why Nicole Kidman Is a Full-Fledged Badass, Even Before ‘Big Little Lies’ — Career Watch
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Nicole Kidman, who’s having something of a renaissance moment.

Bottom Line: Nicole Kidman is one of our most fearless actresses. She’s an Oscar perennial who constantly chases challenging material, edginess be damned. Yes, her most recent nomination stemmed from a very mild-mannered role as Dev Patel’s mother in the true-life Australian drama “Lion,” but for Kidman’s career it’s her exceptions that prove the rule.

She broadened her fanbase by producing, with Reese Witherspoon, the hugely popular and topical HBO drama series “Big Little Lies,” in which she co-starred as Celeste Wright, an elegant Monterey mom trapped in a sadomasochistic power struggle of spousal abuse with her husband Perry (Alexander Skarsgard). Critics’ raves and audience reaction will likely push Kidman to
See full article at Indiewire »

Lars Von Trier Thriller The House That Jack Built Casts Uma Thurman And Siobhan Fallon Hogan

Brick by brick, Lars von Trier thriller The House that Jack Built is fast beginning to take shape.

Originally pitched as a TV series, the Danish auteur (Melancholia, Nymphomaniac) has re-engineered his murder mystery to be an ambitious, decade-spanning drama centering on Matt Dillon’s twisted serial killer. Wanting nothing more than to finish his self-proclaimed, and no doubt horrifying, masterpiece, Jack spends much of his life in the shadows, eluding capture all throughout the ’70s and ’80s. To date, von Trier has recruited Dillon, Bruno Ganz, Sofie Gråbøl and Riley Keough (The Girlfriend Experience, Logan Lucky) to the cause, and Deadline now brings word of two new additions: Uma Thurman and Siobhan Fallon Hogan.

Both actresses have worked with the provocative filmmaker in the past; Thurman recently had a role in the two-part saga Nymphomaniac, whereas Hogan worked under von Trier on both Dancer in the Dark and Dogville.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Uma Thurman Reteams With Lars von Trier For ‘The House That Jack Built,’ Official Synopsis Revealed

Lars von Trier is making a serial killer movie with “The House That Jack Built,” and has found two victims who will fall at the hands of Matt Dillon.

Uma Thurman, who first worked with the filmmaker on his previous effort, “Nymphomaniac,” is reteaming with him here, along with Siobhan Fallon Hogan, who has appeared in von Trier’s “Dancer In The Dark” and “Dogville.” They join the ensemble which also includes Riley Keough, Sofie Gråbøl and Bruno Ganz, in the ’70s and ’80s set story about a serial killer on the run.

Continue reading Uma Thurman Reteams With Lars von Trier For ‘The House That Jack Built,’ Official Synopsis Revealed at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Uma Thurman Reteams With Lars von Trier for ‘The House That Jack Built’

Even if you didn’t see Lars von Trier‘s 241-minute (or 325-minute) two-part Nymphomaniac, there’s a strong chance you witnessed at least part of Uma Thurman‘s performance (courtesy of the above still or the below clip) in the film’s most beautifully awkward scene, surrounding a “whoring bed.” She’ll now get her chance to re-enter the world of Lars von Trier as she’s joined his serial killer drama The House That Jack Built.

As reported by Zentropa, Siobhan Fallon Hogan (Dancer in the Dark, Dogville) will also be re-teaming with von Trier, with both actors playing women who come across the violent path of the lead. Spanning 12 years and following Matt Dillon in the lead role as we see his character’s presumably brutal murders, the film also stars Bruno Ganz, Riley Keough, and Sofia Grabol. The film will be split into “five incidents” (aka
See full article at The Film Stage »

Uma Thurman Boards Lars Von Trier's Serial Killer Thriller

Uma Thurman Boards Lars Von Trier's Serial Killer Thriller
Uma Thurman is re-teaming with Lars von Trier for his upcoming thriller The House That Jack Built.

The actress, who first worked with the Danish director on his last feature, Nymphomaniac, joins Siobhan Fallon Hogan (von Trier's Dancer in the Dark, Dogville) among the ranks of unfortunate women who encounter serial killer Jack, played by Matt Dillon. Riley Keough, Sofie Grabol and Bruno Ganz also star.

"With these two fantastic actresses, the main cast is now in place, and we are ready to shoot – and kill," said Zentropa producer Louise Vesth. "Uma and Lars first worked together on Nymphomaniac and...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Uma Thurman Joins Cast of Lars von Trier’s ‘The House That Jack Built’

Uma Thurman Joins Cast of Lars von Trier’s ‘The House That Jack Built’
Paris– Uma Thurman is set to star in Lars von Trier’s “The House That Jack Built,” the Danish auteur’s anticipated thriller which will topline Matt Dillon as a serial killer.

Siobhan Fallon Hogan has also joined the cast of the English-language film which will star Bruno Ganz, Riley Keough and Sofie Gråbøl.

Both Thurman and Siobhan Fallon Hogan have previously worked with Lars von Trier. Thurman had a role in his last film, “Nymphomaniac,” while Hogan starred in “Dancer in the Dark” and “Dogville.”

“(Thurman) and Lars first worked together on Nymphomaniac and complimented each other in an exceptional way; I can’t wait to see which character they’ll create together this time, said Louise Vesth, who is producing the film at Zentropa.

Vesth also revealed “Lars had (Hogan) in mind from a very early stage for one of the female parts, and it is an honor
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Uma Thurman joins Lars von Trier serial killer thriller

  • ScreenDaily
Uma Thurman joins Lars von Trier serial killer thriller
Siobhan Fallon Hogan also joins cast alongside Matt Dillon, Riley Keough, Sofie Gråbøl and Bruno Ganz; production update from Sweden.

Uma Thurman and Siobhan Fallon Hogan (We Need To Talk About Kevin) have joined the cast of Lars von Trier thriller The House That Jack Built, which is currently in production in Sweden.

Thurman and Fallon Hogan join cast members Matt Dillon, Riley Keough, Sofie Gråbøl and Bruno Ganz.

The film will take place in 1970s USA and will follow the murders that define lead character Jack’s development as a serial killer.

Thurman and Fallon Hogan will join the ranks of unfortunate women who encounter serial killer Jack, played by Dillon.

Von Trier recently told The Guardian that the film “celebrates the idea that life is evil and soulless, sadly proven by the recent rise of the Homo trumpus – the rat king”.

The film is produced by Louise Vesth for Zentropa Group in co-production with Film i Väst
See full article at ScreenDaily »

"The Edit" - Enter Nicole Kidman

  • SneakPeek
Sneak Peek actress Nicole Kidman ("Eyes Wide Shut") posing for the February 2017 issue of "The Edit" magazine, photographed by Yelena Yemchuk:

Kidman's breakthrough film role was in the 1989 thriller "Dead Calm", followed by performances in "Days of Thunder" (1990), "Far and Away" (1992) and "Batman Forever" (1995).

Other films include "Moulin Rouge!" (2001) earning her a 'Golden Globe Award' for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy and her first nomination for the Academy Award for Best Actress.

Kidman's performance as 'Virginia Woolf' in the "The Hours" (2002) earned her an 'Academy Award' for Best Actress...

...the 'BAFTA Award' for Best Actress in a Leading Role, the 'Golden Globe' Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama and the 'Silver Bear' for Best Actress at the 'Berlin International Film Festival'.

Kidman's other notable films include "To Die For" (1995), for which she won her first Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy, "Eyes Wide Shut
See full article at SneakPeek »

‘The House That Jack Built’ First Look: Lars Von Trier Pays Homage to ‘Vampyr’ in Serial-Killer Thriller

‘The House That Jack Built’ First Look: Lars Von Trier Pays Homage to ‘Vampyr’ in Serial-Killer Thriller
Four years after directing “Nymphomaniac,” Lars von Trier is back with a new serial-killer thriller, “The House That Jack Built.” The Danish filmmaker’s new feature stars Matt Dillon and Bruno Ganz and follows the highly intelligent Jack (Dillon) over the course of 12 years, introducing the murders that define his development as a serial killer.

The project, which is in pre-production, will shoot in Trollhättan, Sweden and in Copenhagen and is slated for a 2018 release. Now, Variety has shared the first image from the upcoming film, a black and white photo of a man holding a scythe, an homage to the 1932 horror flick “Vampyr.”

“On the occasion of the shooting of ‘The House That Jack Built,’ I have made an evocative photo with a cinematic reference,” Von Trier told the magazine, commenting on the image from the film.

Here's an exclusive shot from Lars von Trier's thriller “The House That Jack Built
See full article at Indiewire »

Berlinale: Lars von Trier’s ‘House’ Welcomes Distributors (Exclusive)

Berlinale: Lars von Trier’s ‘House’ Welcomes Distributors (Exclusive)
Nordic powerhouse TrustNordisk has inked several pre-sales for Danish auteur Lars von Trier’s serial-killer thriller “The House That Jack Built,” which will star Matt Dillon and Bruno Ganz.

TrustNordisk is shopping the project at Berlin’s Efm and has pre-sold “The House That Jack Built’s” German and Austrian distribution rights to Tele München, one of Germany’s biggest distributors. The sale to Tele München was made on behalf of Zentropa Køln.

Other new deals were signed with Les Films du Losange for France, Seven Films for Greece, Leopardo Filmes for Portugal, Shani Film for Israel, Falcon Films for the Middle East, Sundream for Hong Kong, Russian World Vision for Russia/Cis, Vertigo Media for Hungary, Euro Films for Bulgaria, and Estin Film for the Baltic States.

“‘The House That Jack Built’ has an intriguing cast and coupled with the extraordinary vision of Lars von Trier, the film promises
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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