There's a special going on at Sesame Street. First, Gladys Knight and the Pips sing the theme song, then Phil Donahue interviews the residents; Alastaire Cookie tells us the tale of "The 39... See full summary »

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Adventure | Comedy | Family
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Big Bird is sent to live far from Sesame Street by a pesky social worker. Unhappy, Big Bird runs away from his foster home, prompting the rest of the Sesame Street gang to go on a cross-country journey to find him.

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Short | Family | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Linda Bove ...
Northern Calloway ...
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Loretta Long ...
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Bob McGrath ...
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...
...
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Bert / Grover / Cookie Monster (voice)
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Pretty Great Performances Announcer / Mr. Johnson / Count Von Count / Additional Muppets (voice)
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Placido Flamingo / Additional Muppets (voice)
Martin P. Robinson ...
Telly Monster / Manolo (voice)
...
Elmo / Hoots the Owl / Additional Muppets (voice)
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Storyline

There's a special going on at Sesame Street. First, Gladys Knight and the Pips sing the theme song, then Phil Donahue interviews the residents; Alastaire Cookie tells us the tale of "The 39 Stairs" with Grover. Bob sings the "Who Are the People in Your Neighborhood" song with Ralph Nader, Barbara Walters and Martina Navratilova; Hoots teaches Ernie about how if he wants to play a saxophone, he must put down his duckie; Kermit tries to get Oscar interested in public television; a classic Grover waiter sketch; James Taylor sings an interesting song and finally, some culture: an opera. Written by Dylan Self <robocoptng986127@aol.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

Unrated
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

5 October 1988 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Put Down the Duckie: A Sesame Street Special  »

Filming Locations:


Box Office

Budget:

$50,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

There are unsourced claims that when 'Ralph Nader' was asked to perform the "Sesame Street" staple "The People in Your Neighborhood", he refused to sing the lyric "the people that you meet each day" because it is grammatically incorrect. He insisted on singing "the people whom you meet each day". The claims allege that the producers agreed to this change but convinced him to sing the original lyric on the set. However, listening to the clip Nader can clearly be heard to sing "whom" on his first duo performance - as in fact does the preceding singer Barbara Walters - but on the next two occasions, when he sings in quartet, all four singers appear to use the word 'that'. If not apocryphal, Mader's alleged insistence in changing the words of this known song out of concern for grammatical exactness, becomes ironical given the recording shows him seconds earlier stating "I'm making sure the wheels of this wagon were put on right". A more grammatically pedantic expression would not use the word 'right' as an adverb, but would rather have substituted the word 'correctly': "I'm making sure the wheels of this wagon were put on correctly". See more »

Goofs

During "The People In The Neighborhood" song, Bob accidentally calls Ralph Nader "Barbara" when he's ripping his sweater. See more »

Quotes

Hoots the Owl: Ernie! Ernie my man!
Ernie: Oh, hi there, Hoots.
Hoots the Owl: Oh, dig it. I need your help.
Ernie: Oh sure. What can I do for you?
Hoots the Owl: Well, every time I try to squeak my rubber duckie, I got a funny sound. Watch.
[He squeaks his duck- and plays a few notes on his sax]
Hoots the Owl: See what I mean?
Ernie: Uh, well listen, Hoots. You've gotta put down the saxaphone if you want to squeak your duckie.
Hoots the Owl: [suddenly realizing] Heh, heh, heh. Oh boy.
See more »

Crazy Credits

During the credits, everyone who starred in the special sings "Put Down the Duckie". And, at the very end of the credits, Hoots comes to Ernie with a problem of his own and Ernie gives him very simple advice, "You gotta put down the saxophone if you wanna squeak your duckie". (A homage to "Put Down the Duckie": "Put down the duckie if you wanna play the saxophone") See more »

Connections

References Pee-wee's Playhouse (1986) See more »

Soundtracks

How I Miss My X
Performed by Patti LaBelle
See more »

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User Reviews

This is Sesame Street!!
30 June 2002 | by (U.S.A) – See all my reviews

This is what Sesame Street used to be, before Elmo took over and Jim Henson's peers ruined it. Elmo is in this special by the way, but he was a very small part, because this was back before he was popular. I've enjoyed this special since I was little. The Monster Piece Theatre short is priceless! "Put Down the Duckie" is DA BOMB. And then there's the Grover restaurant sketch. I love seeing those on Sesame Street. The blue guy with brown hair visits a restaurant or a gym or airport, even a taxi, and finds Grover working there, which means this guy is not going to get what he wants. In this priceless sketch, Grover tries to serve this man four specials: Numero uno, Numero Dos, Numero Tres and Numero Quatro. But the song and dance routine causes them to end up on the floor! But now that those jerks changed Sesame Street's format, you won't see these anymore! So really, this special is priceless and a look at what Sesame Street was like before it was run into the ground. If any of you have seen this, I'm sure you loved it. I doubt very much it will ever see the light of day again because the day Sesame Street airs old episodes will be the day that hell freezes over!

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