6.3/10
49
2 user 6 critic

The Death Train (1978)

An insurance investigator, checking into the death of a man run over by a train in his back yard, uncovers a web of murder, land fraud swindles and supernatural beings.

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(as Luis Bayonas)
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Cast

Cast overview:
...
Ted Morrow
Ingrid Mason ...
Vera
Max Meldrum ...
Johnny Loomis
Ken Goodlet ...
Sergeant McMasters
Brian Wenzel ...
Peter Murdoch
Colin Taylor ...
Herbert Cook
Aileen Britton ...
Barmaid / Hotel Desk Clerk
Ron Haddrick ...
Dr.Rogers
Geraldine Ward ...
Johnny's Neighbor
Justine Saunders ...
Greg's Wife
Diana Davidson ...
Real Estate Agent
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Storyline

An insurance investigator, checking into the death of a man run over by a train in his back yard, uncovers a web of murder, land fraud swindles and supernatural beings.

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Release Date:

20 April 1985 (West Germany)  »

Also Known As:

Death Train  »

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Trivia

After this, Hugh Keays-Byrne went on to star, as "Toecutter" in "Mad Max". See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Big Box: The Body Shop (2010) See more »

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User Reviews

 
A fun little film
11 February 2006 | by See all my reviews

This Australian TV movie is a fun little watch. It is a mystery with supernatural overtones as insurance man Ted Morrow (Hugh Keays-Byrne) shows up to investigate the unusual death of a man who was apparently run over by a train in a place where there are no train tracks. What really makes this movie enjoyable is the lead performance of Keays-Byrne, he of "Toecutter" fame from MAD MAX fame. He plays the character as a bit of an eccentric and really adds a lot to the role. Director Igor Auzins bends the mystery to leave both the logical and supernatural options open at the end of the film. This is wonderful in the sense that you can imagine Morrow as being completely insane with the way he unravels the mystery.


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