"Justice League"
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The "Timm-verse" (named for Batman: The Animated Series producer Bruce Timm) is the collective universe of animated series and movies descended from Batman: The Animated Series. The following definitely fall within the Timm-verse: Batman: The Animated Series (1992); Batman: Mask of the Phantasm (1993); Superman: The Last Son of Krypton (1996); The New Batman Adventures (1997); Superman (a.k.a. Superman: The Animated Series; 1997); SubZero (a.k.a. Batman & Mr. Freeze: SubZero; 1998); The Batman/Superman Movie (1998); Batman Beyond (1999); Static Shock (2000); Batman Beyond: Return of the Joker (2000); The Zeta Project (2001); Justice League/Justice League Unlimited (2001); and, Batman: Mystery of the Batwoman (2003).

Yes. The show was cancelled following season five. The final episode was "Destroyer" (Season 5, Episode 13); original U.S. air date: 13 May 2006.

Tim Daly did early recordings picking up from the Superman series, but his schedule for The Fugitive forced him to depart, and George Newbern was cast as his replacement.

Tim Daly would later return to voice Superman in the straight to DVD features "Superman: Brainiac Attacks", "Superman/Batman: Public Enemies", "Superman/Batman: Apocalypse" and "Justice League: Doom."

George Newbern has returned to voice Superman for "The Batman", "Superman/Shazam: The Return of Black Adam", "Superman Vs. The Elite" and the video game "Injustice: Gods Among Us".

Presumably, it is an opposites attract, "prom queen wanting bad boy" scenario - Wonder Woman (the bright, up beat optimist) wanting Batman (dark, brooding).

According to Bruce Timm, they pursued this storyline over the better known comic book implicationof Wonder Woman being attracted to Superman because they felt it was "more interesting" and also seeing the strong reaction fans had to seeing Wonder Woman give Batman a 'thank you' kiss on the cheek in an episode where he showed great concern for her welfare.

And because he's the Goddamn Batman - although seeing as how they're not together at the end of either Justice League or Batman Beyond (where Bruce is an old man) it could easily be seen as having merely been a phase for her.

No, this storyline was unique only to the animated series.

According to Bruce Timm the relationship was inspired by watching voice actors Phil Lamarr (John Stewart/Green Lantern) and Maria Canals (Hawkgirl/Shayera Hol) play off one another during recording sessions and feeling the chemistry between them.

Maybe; a direct-to-video movie may get produced. Producer Bruce Timm has indicated that "there's a good chance fans will be seeing Justice League: World's Collide, the script by Dwayne McDuffie that bridged the popular Justice League and Justice League Unlimited animated series."

Bruce Timm acknowledged that John Stewart was chosen over the better known Hal Jordan, the Silver Age Green Lantern and considered by many fans to be the definitive Green Lantern even though he was not the original bearer of the title (the original Green Lantern was Alan Scott from the Golden Age), and Kyle Rayner, who had been introduced in "Superman: The Animated Series" and was the current Green Lantern of the comic books at the time, because of a desire for more ethnic diversity, which Stewart filled due to his being African American. Timm has also stated that since Stewart wasn't as well known (the character had been introduced in the 1970s as Hal Jordan's backup Lantern and became a recurring character who even took over Hal's series in the 1980s when Hal resigned from the Green Lantern and later had his own series in the 1990s, "Green Lantern: Mosiac," but never quite caught on with fans, and had faded into obscurity for a time), that gave Timm and the writers more freedom to write for him without having to adhere as strictly to established comic book lore. Also, the producers thought that Stewart's originally belligerent personalty had more dramatic potential playing against the other characters. Additionally, Hal Jordan was technically dead at the time in comics (after descending into madness as the anti-hero Parallax, Jordan sacrificed himself to save the Earth from the Sun Eater in the "Final Night" storyline, which led to a tour of duty as the Specter), hence another reason for Jordan's not being the primary Green Lantern. Instead, he has a quick cameo in "The Once & Future Thing, Part 2". Ironically, the Justice League animated series sparked interest in Stewart's character among fans which the comics had not generated. This led to Stewart being brought back into mainstream DC comics as a recurring character who is now a regular duty Lantern of the reformed and expanded Green Lantern Corps and Hal Jordan's equal partner of their assigned space patrol sector of 2814, which includes Earth.


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