7.6/10
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The Hours (2002)

PG-13 | | Drama, Romance | 14 February 2003 (USA)
The story of how the novel "Mrs. Dalloway" affects three generations of women, all of whom, in one way or another, have had to deal with suicide in their lives.

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Writers:

(novel), (screenplay)
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Popularity
2,123 ( 78)

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ON DISC
Won 1 Oscar. Another 41 wins & 125 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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George Loftus ...
Quentin Bell
Charley Ramm ...
Julian Bell
Sophie Wyburd ...
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Lottie Hope (as Lyndsay Marshal)
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Nelly Boxall
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Ralph Partridge
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Doctor
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Storyline

In 1951, Laura Brown, a pregnant housewife, is planning a party for her husband, but she can't stop reading the novel 'Mrs. Dalloway'. Clarissa Vaughn, a modern woman living in present times is throwing a party for her friend Richard, a famous author dying of AIDS. These two stories are simultaneously linked to the work and life of Virginia Woolf, who's writing the novel mentioned before. Written by Jonas Reinartz <jonas.reinarzt@web.de>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Three women in their search for happiness See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for mature thematic elements, some disturbing images and brief language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

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Release Date:

14 February 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Las horas  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$25,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$338,622, 29 December 2002, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$41,675,994, 22 May 2003

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$108,846,072
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

All three leading actresses have won Academy Awards. See more »

Goofs

The bag of flour in the background when Laura Brown is talking to Kitty at the coffee table. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Virginia Woolf: [Narrating the letter] Dearest, I feel certain that I am going mad again. I feel I can't go through another one of these terrible times and I shant recover this time. I begin to hear voices and can't concentrate. So, I am doing what seems to be the best thing to do. You have given me the greatest possible happiness. You have been in every way all that anyone could be. I know that I am spoiling your life and without me you could work and you will, I know. You see I can't even write ...
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Connections

Referenced in Jeopardy!: Episode #33.4 (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

Satyagraha
by Philip Glass
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User Reviews

 
Best Movie of 2002.
1 January 2003 | by See all my reviews

"The Hours" was the first movie I've seen in 2003. I'm easily going to name it as the best movie of 2002 and something tells me that in 12 months time, I will be saying it's one of the best movies of 2003 as well.

Based on a Michael Cunningham novel, "The Hours" combines a real life story (Virginia Woolf), a re-written one (Laura Brown's interpretation of "Mrs. Dalloway") and an original creation as well (Clarissa Vaughn).

We get three different stories, each fascinating on its own edited together into a complex, intriguing drama that will have you in tears a couple of times before the ending credits start rolling.

What glues the stories together is "Mrs. Dalloway" - the book. Virginia Woolf, a suicidal author in England (1923) creates the character, the novel inspires a lonely housewife in Los Angeles (1951) and a 'trivial' 2001 New York City gay woman is called "Mrs. Dalloway" by her dying friend who points out the similarities between them. Later on, we find out another connection between the characters.

It's clear that the thoughts that have been put into this movie go beyond the screenplay and acting. Things like the settings & clothing for each story help compile a perfect, believable plot.

However, what really left me with awe was the PHENOMENAL acting.

Nicole Kidman (with the word "Oscar" stamped on her forehead) delivers a performance of a lifetime playing a rather difficult role while disguising everything that is usually so associated with her. With a fake nose, a cold, dark and distant attitude and above all a rough change to her voice, Kidman portrays Mrs. Woolf exactly as the writers wanted us to grasp her and manages to be the most outstanding of the three despite getting the least screen time. Absolutely amazing.

Meryl Streep (C. Vaughn, 2001) and Julianne Moore (L. Brown, 1951) give impressive lead performances themselves with memorable emotional scenes. Cameo appearances by Ed Harris, Claire Danse, John C. Riley, Alison Janney & Toni Collette all support this exquisite masterpiece.

MUST SEE. 10/10


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