The history of color photography in motion pictures, in particular the Technicolor company's work.

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, (based on the book by)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Narrator (voice)
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Herself
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Herself
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Herself
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Himself - Cinematographer (archive footage)
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Himself - Cinematographer
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Himself - Cinematographer
Eugen Sandow ...
Himself (archive footage)
Annabelle Moore ...
Herself - Dancer (archive footage) (as Annabelle)
Cammie King Conlon ...
Herself - Step-daughter of Dr. Herbert Kalmus
Richard J. Goldberg ...
Himself - Dr., Technicolor research scientist 1953-65
Robert Gitt ...
Himself - Preservationist, UCLA Film and Television Archive (voice)
Fred Basten ...
Himself - Author of 'Glorious Technicolor'
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Himself (archive footage)
Ron Jarvis ...
Himself - President, Technicolor Worldwide Filmgroup
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Storyline

The history of color photography in motion pictures, in particular the Technicolor company's work.

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Release Date:

7 December 1998 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Released on the 2003 DVD of The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938). See more »

Goofs

The documentation completely ignores the earlier German system "Agfacolor" which is the mother of all modern multi-layer color systems. See more »

Connections

Features The Women (1939) See more »

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User Reviews

 
detailed historical analysis of the process
8 January 2005 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

Now available on DVD, this documentary looks at the ups and downs of Technicolor and the importance of film milestones such as 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs'; 'Becky Sharp'; 'The Black Pirate'; and 'Gone With The Wind'. It shows how colour in films grew from experiments in two-strip and three-strip bits to full-length mistakes, travelogues and total triumphs.

It makes interesting points about the fear of actresses that colour would remove their mystique (until Dietrich and 'The Garden of Allah' that is); about the constant interference of Natalie Kalmus ('creative consultant' on all Technicolor films); and about the eventual acceptance of the process as industry standard worldwide. The examples shown prove that the colour palette available to films in their heyday enhanced the 'golden age' - later films in Eastmancolor and the like look washed-out in comparison.


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