7.4/10
27,878
128 user 101 critic

24 Hour Party People (2002)

In 1976, Tony Wilson sets up Factory Records and brings Manchester's music to the world.

Writer:

(screenplay)

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ON DISC
1 win & 13 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Charles
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Mark Windows ...
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Raymond Waring ...
Vini
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Derek Ryder
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Danny Cunningham ...
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Nigel Pivaro ...
Actor at Granada
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Storyline

Manchester 1976: Cambridge educated Tony Wilson, Granada TV presenter, is at a Sex Pistols gig. Totally inspired by this pivotal moment in music history, he and his friends set up a record label, Factory Records, signing first Joy Division (who go on to become New Order) then James and the Happy Mondays, who all become seminal artists of their time. What ensues is a tale of music, sex, drugs, larger-than-life characters, and the birth of one of the most famous dance clubs in the world, The Hacienda - a mecca for clubbers as famous as the likes of Studio 54. Graphically depicting the music and dance heritage of Manchester from the late 70's to the early 90's, this comedy documents the vibrancy that made Mad-chester the place in the world that you would most like to be. Written by IGB

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The unbelievably true story of one man, one movement, the music and madness that was Manchester.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong language, drug use and sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

20 September 2002 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

24 ores gemates rock  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Opening Weekend:

£265,428 (UK) (5 April 2002)

Gross:

$1,130,379 (USA) (11 October 2002)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Joy Division and New Order bass player, Peter Hook, was meant to have a cameo role in the film, playing a man who crashes his car after being hit by poisoned pigeons. Unfortunately, on the morning of the shoot, the film makers realized that they had no insurance for "real" musicians. See more »

Goofs

Yamaha NS10 studio monitors/speakers are clearly seen when camera is panning around studio as Joy Division are recording. These monitors weren't available until 1987. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Tony Wilson: Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's the latest craze sweeping the Pennines, and I've got to be honest, I'd rather be sweeping the Pennines right now.
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Connections

Referenced in Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

Freaky Dancin'
Written by Shaun Ryder, Paul Ryder, Mark Day, Paul Davis and Gary Whelan
Copyright London Music
By kind permission of Warner/Chappell Music Ltd
Performed by cast members
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User Reviews

Worth multiple viewings and a little homework
24 June 2003 | by See all my reviews

I get the general sense from reading some of the reviews that people didn't like this movie because it didn't provide any instant gratification or personal meaning. That's probably true for people who don't know Joy Division, New Order, or the Happy Mondays, but I think it's totally unfair to discredit this film on a basis of a lack of prior knowledge. Many great films and novels aren't great because you get them on the first try, and I think that this movie follows the same path. If you didn't like it the first time, take a look at an old Tony Wilson interview or a concert tape of Joy Division and you will instantly see the quality production and acting that went into this film. Ian Curtis/Joy Division are portrayed with an eerily haunting accuracy (down to the instruments they play, which are rumoured to be the originals from the late 1970s) and you can tell that the cast really did their homework. The concert scenes are spectacularly energetic, the sets (especially the Hacienda) are ripped right out of the time period. Comic relief isn't overlooked, as the dry humour of Steve Coogan and the rest of the cast is pursued to the dime. The unscripted dialogue is also quite good, which is another indication of the actors' homework. This movie is worth the time: it details a very important time and place in pop music history that is often overlooked in the wake of much larger, more commercialized scenes. Rave and post-punk may be fading today, but one need only take a look at the charts to see its influence. Go out and get this movie, learn a little about it, and you will be impressed.


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