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Rogue One, Lion, and More New Movies and TV Shows Coming to Netflix in July

18 July 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | POPSUGAR | See recent BuzzSugar news »

Ready to kick your Summer up a notch? Netflix has finally released the list of all the new titles coming this July, and it's pretty stacked. Whether you want to cry (Titanic), laugh (The Standups), or binge a new show until the sun comes up (might we suggest Ozark?), Netflix has you covered. Take a look at what's being added below. July 1 Titanic (Watch now!) The Originals season four (Watch now!) Free Willy (Watch now!) Disney's The Mighty Ducks (Watch now!) Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa (Watch now!) Capo "El amo del tunel" season one (Watch now!) El Barco season one (Watch now!) The Truth Is in the Stars (Watch now!) Deep Water season one (Watch now!) E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (Watch now!) Zip & Zap and the Marble Gang (Watch now!) Albion: The Enchanted Stallion (Watch now!) Liar's Dice (Watch now!) Offspring season six (Watch now!) Boat Trip (Watch now!) Mixed Signals (Watch now! »

- Quinn Keaney

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Attention, Filmmakers: Here’s How You Can Direct Shots Like Paul Thomas Anderson — Watch

12 July 2017 7:29 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

What makes a Paul Thomas Anderson shot feel so unique? That’s the question at the center of a new video essay from StudioBinder that analyzes the director’s most iconic images and teaches aspiring filmmakers how they can approach shot-buiding from a similar perspective.

Anderson has made eight features in his two decades as a director, including the upcoming fashion drama with Daniel Day-Lewis, and when looking at his filmography in chronological order one can easily see the evolution of his style and personal filmmaking voice. His early days were marked by his greatest influences — Jonathan Demme and his intimate closeups, Martin Scorsese and his tracking shots — and Anderson’s style has become defined by the way he has taken these touchstones and made them his own.

Ead More: Why Paul Thomas Anderson Didn’t Hire a Cinematographer For His New Movie

Working with cinematographers Robert Elswit and Mihai Mălaimare Jr. »

- Zack Sharf

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New to Streaming: ‘Punch-Drunk Love,’ ‘Free Fire,’ ‘The Salesman,’ and More

7 July 2017 5:01 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Best in Show (Christopher Guest)

Christopher Guest has had an exceptionally strong ’00s with A Mighty Wind and For Your Consideration, and it remains to be seen how his upcoming Mascots will be received, but his arguable peak is still the gloriously funny mockumentary Best in Show. Guest’s other films have lovingly skewered egotistical oddballs and the insanity of subjective or objective criticism, so Best in Show is »

- Jordan Raup

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Midway Oscars Forecast: A Cluttered Landscape for Indies and Streamers

29 June 2017 4:48 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It was barely four months ago that director Barry Jenkins stood alongside the baffled cast and crew of “Moonlight” at the Dolby Theatre after defying virtually every known Oscar convention in spectacular, immortal fashion. But just eight short weeks from now, the season will purr right back to life at the Venice and Telluride film festivals. Hollywood will set its sights on that coveted gold statuette for the 90th time, and a new flock of prestige productions will vie for the industry’s top honor.

New York-based distributor A24’s victory brought the best picture tally for independents (and studio dependents) up to nine over the past decade. The only major studio to score in that stretch was Warner Bros. with “Argo,” as the game of Oscar continues to be one of bolstering the financial outlook of artistic risks that conglomerate-tethered companies feel they can’t afford. A glance at the horizon this year reveals a healthy »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Paul Thomas Anderson’s Best Scenes, Ranked

26 June 2017 9:47 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Paul Thomas Anderson is one of the most revered American filmmakers of the last 20 years in part because he’s so unclassifiable. Working in a range of genres while tackling subjects that skew from anger management to American capitalism, religion and porn, Anderson has built a filmography distinguished by its unpredictability — and the sheer originality he brings to each new effort. Beyond the stories that distinguish his movies are the many ways in which they immerse viewers in fully defined worlds.

Every Anderson movie is an absorbing experience loaded with strange, funny, and shocking moments, all of which speak to the agenda of an artist keen on pushing the medium beyond its most familiar forms.

Read More: What Paul Thomas Anderson Movies Really Have to Say About Finding Purpose in Life — Watch

There may be no better way to survey the range of achievements in Anderson’s work than to »

- Eric Kohn, Kate Erbland, Jude Dry, Graham Winfrey and Zack Sharf

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‘Better Call Saul’: Why That Blockbuster Video Scene Was Important, But Also a ‘Nail-Biter’ to Make

22 June 2017 1:41 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

[Editor’s Note: Mild spoilers for Season 3, Episode 10, “Lantern” follow.]

It’s at times easy to forget that “Better Call Saul” is a period piece, if only because its 2002-2003 setting isn’t always noticeably distinguishable from the present day. But then every once in a while, creators Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould slap us in the face with a reminder that this show is happening in the past. It can be as simple as a trip to a video store — but not just any video store.

Read More: ‘Better Call Saul’: The 7 Times Jimmy and Kim Kissed On Screen, And How That Makes It The Most Rewarding Romance on TV

It’s something we all accepted as routine, just 15 years ago: Want to watch a movie? Go to Blockbuster Video. So in the Season 3 finale, “Lantern,” Kim (Rhea Seehorn) asks her assistant Francesca (Tina Parker) for a ride to what was once the dominant source for Americans in search of movie rentals, and we then get to see her browse the aisles in search of the perfect comfort viewing, following her near-fatal car accident the episode prior.

Executive producer Gennifer Hutchison, who wrote the season finale, told IndieWire that the decision to have Kim visit a video store came in the writers’ room, as the team discussed what Kim might possibly do after deciding to relax following her accident. “I just really loved the idea of her renting a bunch of videos and sitting around watching movies and eating junk food. Just because it’s something I relate to, it’s something I like to do when I destress. And I feel like it’s not something you see a lot of on TV and in movies,” she said.

And as a result, Gould — who directed the finale — got very excited about the idea of Kim going to not just any video store, but Blockbuster in particular. However, don’t think that this was an easy choice for the show — because according to production designer Michael Novotny, “it was a total nail-biter.”

Novotny told IndieWire that as soon as he received word that “Saul” wanted to recreate a Blockbuster, he got his team to work — specifically, the graphics department. “I can always do a set. A set’s the easy part. The hard part is the graphics and all of the art work you’re going to turn out,” he said.

But that process started before the show had actual permission to recreate a Blockbuster. “We started to build it without approval. That’s part of the nail-biting process,” he said. “It wasn’t until the day before we shot it that we got approval.”

This is because, as anyone who works in production might tell you, trying to depict a real brand on screen can be an incredibly difficult task. And the “Saul” team wanted to actually use Blockbuster iconography, which isn’t the easiest thing given that it’s a brand name you haven’t probably seen in the wild in years.

Blockbuster went bankrupt in 2010, and “roughly a dozen” stores currently exist today. Thus, the set was built on one of the show’s Albuquerque soundstages, and in fact, a great deal of what was on screen was made from scratch by the “Saul” production team, including the big Blockbuster sign hanging in the wall and the period-accurate movie covers.

One thing they were able to buy: the shelving units came thanks to an ironic stroke of luck and an Albuquerque video store that was going out of business. The production was thus able to buy those displays, which Novotny made sure were shortened so that, as they shot the scene, Kim and Francesca could be seen walking through the aisles. That framing was based on Gould’s storyboards, which were altered slightly during the production process, but otherwise didn’t require any major additional construction.

But really, here’s what people care about — the movies that are being considered, as Kim prepares for an epic binge in the pre-Netflix days. None of the titles are fake, and Novotny did work carefully with his team to carefully curate the movies that appeared on screen during the scene, all of which were drawn from a list provided by Peter Gould and the writers. Here are just some of the ones we happened to spot while freeze-framing:

“A Knight’s Tale” “Lawrence of Arabia” (the 40th anniversary special edition) “Love Liza” “The Mothman Prophecies” “Punch-Drunk Love” A Richard Pryor stand-up special “Beverly Hills Ninja” “The Cheap Detective” “Hanky Panky” “Blue Thunder” “American Sledge” “Darkness Falls” “Night of the Living Dead

They’re all movies that feel appropriate to the era at least within a year or two or as classics, though unfortunately a quick Internet search can reveal whether a film in question would have been available on DVD in the year 2003. Perhaps the most glaring oversight is the appearance of Tim Burton’s “Big Fish,” which was released in theaters December 10, 2003 and made available on DVD April 27, 2004 — something Hutchison’s husband (who actually worked at Blockbuster in the past) noticed while watching the final product. “We don’t always get it right,” she admitted.

Novotny acknowledged the “Big Fish” error, but he was relatively zen about it, given the intense pressure of making the scene happen in the first place. “It really was a down to the wire thing,” he said. “If that’s as much as I’m wrong… I’m sad to hear that but at the same time I’m happy that it went as good as it did.”

Update: On Twitter, Gould offered a little clarity as to why “Big Fish” might have time traveled back a year:

And that #BigFish they mention? Could be a shoutout to my former student @johnaugust… #YesYouReadThatRight

Peter Gould (@petergould) June 23, 2017

Hutchison couldn’t remember every one of the 10 films Kim officially rented, though such a list was made during production. Beyond “To Kill a Mockingbird” and “Monty Python,” she said the rest were mostly legal dramas, though she did make sure to include the Luc Besson sci-fi romp “The Fifth Element.” “That was one for some reason I was really stuck on making sure was in her stack,” Hutchison said.

While hardly the most memorable scene of the finale, it still sticks in the mind because of how it triggers memories of an experience we’ve largely lost, traded in for the convenience of Netflix.

“I like the idea of physically walking around and choosing movies,” Hutchison said. “There is something about actually going into a store, having everything broken down by genre. Sometimes with the streaming services it’s a little overwhelming, but having that physical space… I don’t know. It was like a ritual.”

And depicting that ritual was just more proof that “Better Call Saul” will always find a way to surprise us with the seemingly mundane.

Stay on top of the latest film and TV news! Sign up for our film and TV email newsletter here.

Related stories'Better Call Saul': The 7 Times Jimmy and Kim Kissed On Screen, And How That Makes It The Most Rewarding Romance on TVThe 20 Best-Directed TV Drama Series of the 21st Century, Ranked'Better Call Saul' Review: Season 3 Finale Proves A Good Man Knows When to Give Up »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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‘Better Call Saul’: Why That Blockbuster Video Scene Was Important, But Also a ‘Nail-Biter’ to Make

22 June 2017 1:41 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor’s Note: Mild spoilers for Season 3, Episode 10, “Lantern” follow.]

It’s at times easy to forget that “Better Call Saul” is a period piece, if only because its 2002-2003 setting isn’t always noticeably distinguishable from the present day. But then every once in a while, creators Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould slap us in the face with a reminder that this show is happening in the past. It can be as simple as a trip to a video store — but not just any video store.

Read More: ‘Better Call Saul’: The 7 Times Jimmy and Kim Kissed On Screen, And How That Makes It The Most Rewarding Romance on TV

It’s something we all accepted as routine, just 15 years ago: Want to watch a movie? Go to Blockbuster Video. So in the Season 3 finale, “Lantern,” Kim (Rhea Seehorn) asks her assistant Francesca (Tina Parker) for a ride to what was once the dominant source for Americans in search of movie rentals, and we then get to see her browse the aisles in search of the perfect comfort viewing, following her near-fatal car accident the episode prior.

Executive producer Gennifer Hutchison, who wrote the season finale, told IndieWire that the decision to have Kim visit a video store came in the writers’ room, as the team discussed what Kim might possibly do after deciding to relax following her accident. “I just really loved the idea of her renting a bunch of videos and sitting around watching movies and eating junk food. Just because it’s something I relate to, it’s something I like to do when I destress. And I feel like it’s not something you see a lot of on TV and in movies,” she said.

And as a result, Gould — who directed the finale — got very excited about the idea of Kim going to not just any video store, but Blockbuster in particular. However, don’t think that this was an easy choice for the show — because according to production designer Michael Novotny, “it was a total nail-biter.”

Novotny told IndieWire that as soon as he received word that “Saul” wanted to recreate a Blockbuster, he got his team to work — specifically, the graphics department. “I can always do a set. A set’s the easy part. The hard part is the graphics and all of the art work you’re going to turn out,” he said.

But that process started before the show had actual permission to recreate a Blockbuster. “We started to build it without approval. That’s part of the nail-biting process,” he said. “It wasn’t until the day before we shot it that we got approval.”

This is because, as anyone who works in production might tell you, trying to depict a real brand on screen can be an incredibly difficult task. And the “Saul” team wanted to actually use Blockbuster iconography, which isn’t the easiest thing given that it’s a brand name you haven’t probably seen in the wild in years.

Blockbuster went bankrupt in 2010, and “roughly a dozen” stores currently exist today. Thus, the set was built on one of the show’s Albuquerque soundstages, and in fact, a great deal of what was on screen was made from scratch by the “Saul” production team, including the big Blockbuster sign hanging in the wall and the period-accurate movie covers.

One thing they were able to buy: the shelving units came thanks to an ironic stroke of luck and an Albuquerque video store that was going out of business. The production was thus able to buy those displays, which Novotny made sure were shortened so that, as they shot the scene, Kim and Francesca could be seen walking through the aisles. That framing was based on Gould’s storyboards, which were altered slightly during the production process, but otherwise didn’t require any major additional construction.

But really, here’s what people care about — the movies that are being considered, as Kim prepares for an epic binge in the pre-Netflix days. None of the titles are fake, and Novotny did work carefully with his team to carefully curate the movies that appeared on screen during the scene, all of which were drawn from a list provided by Peter Gould and the writers. Here are just some of the ones we happened to spot while freeze-framing:

“A Knight’s Tale” “Lawrence of Arabia” (the 40th anniversary special edition) “Love Liza” “The Mothman Prophecies” “Punch-Drunk Love” A Richard Pryor stand-up special “Beverly Hills Ninja” “The Cheap Detective” “Hanky Panky” “Blue Thunder” “American Sledge” “Darkness Falls” “Night of the Living Dead

They’re all movies that feel appropriate to the era at least within a year or two or as classics, though unfortunately a quick Internet search can reveal whether a film in question would have been available on DVD in the year 2003. Perhaps the most glaring oversight is the appearance of Tim Burton’s “Big Fish,” which was released in theaters December 10, 2003 and made available on DVD April 27, 2004 — something Hutchison’s husband (who actually worked at Blockbuster in the past) noticed while watching the final product. “We don’t always get it right,” she admitted.

Novotny acknowledged the “Big Fish” error, but he was relatively zen about it, given the intense pressure of making the scene happen in the first place. “It really was a down to the wire thing,” he said. “If that’s as much as I’m wrong… I’m sad to hear that but at the same time I’m happy that it went as good as it did.”

Update: On Twitter, Gould offered a little clarity as to why “Big Fish” might have time traveled back a year:

And that #BigFish they mention? Could be a shoutout to my former student @johnaugust… #YesYouReadThatRight

Peter Gould (@petergould) June 23, 2017

Hutchison couldn’t remember every one of the 10 films Kim officially rented, though such a list was made during production. Beyond “To Kill a Mockingbird” and “Monty Python,” she said the rest were mostly legal dramas, though she did make sure to include the Luc Besson sci-fi romp “The Fifth Element.” “That was one for some reason I was really stuck on making sure was in her stack,” Hutchison said.

While hardly the most memorable scene of the finale, it still sticks in the mind because of how it triggers memories of an experience we’ve largely lost, traded in for the convenience of Netflix.

“I like the idea of physically walking around and choosing movies,” Hutchison said. “There is something about actually going into a store, having everything broken down by genre. Sometimes with the streaming services it’s a little overwhelming, but having that physical space… I don’t know. It was like a ritual.”

And depicting that ritual was just more proof that “Better Call Saul” will always find a way to surprise us with the seemingly mundane.

Stay on top of the latest film and TV news! Sign up for our film and TV email newsletter here.

Related stories'Better Call Saul': The 7 Times Jimmy and Kim Kissed On Screen, And How That Makes It The Most Rewarding Romance on TVThe 20 Best-Directed TV Drama Series of the 21st Century, Ranked'Better Call Saul' Review: Season 3 Finale Proves A Good Man Knows When to Give Up »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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‘Marvel’s The Defenders’ Look Ready to Crack Some Skulls in Stylish New Poster

21 June 2017 7:46 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

This August, “The Defenders” are finally banding together to clean up New York City.

Now that Daredevil (Charlie Cox), Jessica Jones (Krysten Ritter), Luke Cage (Mike Colter) and Iron Fist (Finn Jones) have all starred in their individual series, it’s time to create the supergroup to take out the bad guys in the long-awaited culmination of the Marvel series on Netflix. The streaming service released a new poster today to tease the battle to come this summer.

Read More: ‘The Defenders’ Trailer: Watch Daredevil, Jessica Jones Luke Cage, and Iron Fist Team Up for Marvel Summer Fun

War is being waged for control of the Big Apple, and while details are scarce so far, it seems that Sigourney Weaver’s character is going to be one of the main antagonists, following in the footsteps of the likes of evildoer such as Wilson Fisk, aka Kingpin (Vincent D’Onofrio). The Oscar nominee will play Alexandra, the sophisticated and way too smart head of an ancient organization who are up to no good. Also on the bad guy front are the Hand, a group of assassins who not only have ridiculous martial arts skills but also have a pesky habit of coming back from the dead. In fact, they even resurrected Elektra (Elodie Yung), the ex-girlfriend of Daredevil, aka Matthew Murdock.

The series will also bring back Daredevil’s mentor Stick (Scott Glen), Matt’s legal partner Foggy Nelson (Elden Henson), Karen Page (Deborah Ann Woll), Jeri Hogarth (Carrie-Anne Moss), Trish Walker (Rachael Taylor), Malcolm Ducasse (Eka Darville), Misty Knight (Simone Missick), and arguably the best part of “Iron Fist,” Colleen Wing (Jessica Henwick). Oh yeah, Claire Temple (Rosario Dawson) will also be back because she’s in all of them.

Check out the individual moving posters and the badass, stylish team poster below feating all of The Defenders giving their best perfume ad stare (except for Daredevil, who’s wearing shades):

I don't need sight to know you're staring. #Defend pic.twitter.com/ImHiFFvcCU

Daredevil (@Daredevil) June 22, 2017

This is my face. Now get out of it. #Defend pic.twitter.com/UI6yYFGPNj

Jessica Jones (@JessicaJones) June 22, 2017

Straight outta Harlem. #Defend pic.twitter.com/P859gY7wAm

Luke Cage (@LukeCage) June 22, 2017

They didn't teach this kind of focus in K'un-Lun. #Defend pic.twitter.com/0H2Qphr8EG

Iron Fist (@MarvelIronFist) June 22, 2017

All eight episodes of “The Defenders” will be released on Aug. 18 on Netflix.

Stay on top of the latest TV news! Sign up for our TV email newsletter here.

Related stories'Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later' Trailer: Camp Firewood Reopens Once More This AugustNetflix: Full List of Movies Arriving in July 2017 Includes 'Rogue One' and 'Punch-Drunk Love''Glow': Alison Brie Gets Slammed, Slapped and a 'Crotch to Face' in Behind-the-Scenes Video - Watch »

- Hanh Nguyen

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Here’s What’s Coming to Netflix in July 2017

21 June 2017 11:51 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Netflix has announced a slew of movies and TV shows coming to the streaming service next month, and it’s pretty solid! There are some big blockbusters heading to Netflix like Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, but also solid cinephile fare like Paul Thomas Anderson’s Punch-Drunk Love. After expiring in June, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial is back in the fold, and James Cameron’s epic love story Titanic will be available for your streaming pleasure. There are also a couple of intriguing Netflix originals like the anorexia-centric To the Bone and the Jessica Williams romantic … »

- Adam Chitwood

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Netflix: Full List of Movies Arriving in July 2017 Includes ‘Rogue One’ and ‘Punch-Drunk Love’

21 June 2017 8:15 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Netflix has announced the list of films that will be available to stream in July. The list includes new never-before-seen original films, as well as documentaries, comedies, animated titles and some classic movies. Check out some of our favorite new offerings below, along with the complete list of all the new additions.

Read More: Netflix’s Next Big Move? Hacking the Oscars

1. “To the Bone” (available July 14)

Marti Noxon’s feature directorial debut was a hit out of Sundance, where the Lily Collins-starring drama about eating disorders won over audiences for its nimble ability to tell a compelling dramatic story interspersed with well-earned humor. Sketched from Noxon’s own experiences with anorexia and bolstered by a star turn from the always-reliable Collins, the film is both important and entertaining, and it should be able to reach a very wide audience on the streaming platform. Do not miss it.

2. “Punch-Drunk Love” (available July 1)

Paul Thomas Anderson’s lauded 2002 romantic dramedy features Adam Sandler in one of his few “hey, this guy can really act!” roles and includes some of the auteur’s most indelible shots and richest observations about life and love. It’s a modern classic, and now it can be piped right into your home. I’m lookin’ at your Netflix queue and I just wanna smash it. I just wanna fuckin’ smash it with a sledgehammer and squeeze it. It’s so pretty.

3. “Chasing Coral”  (available July 14)

Jeff Orlowski won the U.S. Documentary Audience Award at Sundance earlier this year for his newest feature, a stunning documentary about the fight to protect coral reefs from becoming extinct. Featuring breathtaking and distressing underwater footage, the movie puts into perspective just how endangered coral reefs are and tracks the effort to save them.

4. “Lion” (available July 9)

This heart-wrenching true story was an awards season juggernaut earlier this year, featuring stellar turns from Nicole Kidman and Dev Patel. Based on the unbelievable life of young Saroo Brierley, the feature follows his separation from his family and his startling trip back to them many years later, aided by — for real — Google Maps and his own indomitable heart. Bring tissues. 

5. “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” (available July 18)

The very first standalone “Star Wars” spinoff follows a motley crew of rogues, criminals, rebels, and scallawags as they attempt to steal the plans to the monstrous Death Star in a bid to really just totally stick it to the Empire and Darth Vader. Knowing how it ends — they get them! and…some other stuff, too! — doesn’t dilute its tension and creativity, and it features a banger of an ensemble cast. Let this one tide you over before the next entry in the rapidly expanding movie universe.

6. “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” (available July 1)

The early part of the month is heavy on kid-leaning classics, from “Free Willy” to “The Mighty Ducks,” but it’s hard to top the potency of Steven Spielberg’s 1982 classic. Gather the whole family around the TV and get heavy on the Reese’s Pieces, and enjoy one of the best films ever made about childhood, friendship, and letting go.

Here are the rest of the incoming films for this July:

Available July 1

Titanic

Free Willy

Disney’s The Mighty Ducks

Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa

The Truth Is in the Stars

E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial

Zip & Zap and the Marble Gang

The Invisible Guest (Contratiempo)

Albion: The Enchanted Stallion

Liar’s Dice

Boat Trip

Mixed Signals

Delicatessen

Caramel

Unriddle II

Unriddle

Emma

The Boy in the Striped Pajamas

Last Night

Out of Thin Air

The Longest Yard

Jackass: Number Two

Punch-Drunk Love

Are We There Yet?

Are We Done Yet?

The Land Before Time Dad

The Land Before Time II: The Great Valley Adventure

The Land Before Time III: The Time of the Great Giving

Here Alone

Spawn: The Movie

Code Name: The Cleaner

The Astronaut Farmer

Best in Show

Proof of Life

Matchstick Men

Taking Lives

Police Academy

Available July 3

Diamond Cartel

Extraordinary: The Stan Romanek Story

Available July 6

Speech & Debate

The Void

Butter

Available July 7

1 Mile to You (Life At These Speeds)

Available July 8

Bad Santa 2

Horse Dancer

Available July 9

Lion

Available July 14

To the Bone, Netflix Original

Chasing Coral, Netflix Original

Buddy Thunderstruck: The Maybe Pile, Netflix Original

Available July 17

Uncertain Glory

A Cowgirl’s Story

Available July 18

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

Available July 22

Railroad Tigers

Available July 24

Victor

Available July 28

The Incredible Jessica James, Netflix Original

Available July 31

After The Reality

Checkpoint

Dark Night

Taking Earth

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Related stories'Glow': Alison Brie Gets Slammed, Slapped and a 'Crotch to Face' in Behind-the-Scenes Video - WatchNetflix's Next Big Move? Hacking the Oscars'Gypsy' Review: Naomi Watts' Netflix Series is Impossibly Dull Given Who's Involved »

- Kate Erbland

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More Cannes Winners: Diane Kruger to Become the New Isabelle Huppert + Best Director Coppola Oscar Chances?

20 June 2017 8:05 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'In the Fade' with Diane Kruger: Fatih Akin's German-language Avenging Woman drama may give its star the chance to become next awards season Isabelle Huppert. Diane Kruger: 2017–2018 awards season's Isabelle Huppert? The 2003 Cannes Film Festival's Female Revelation Chopard Trophy winner, Diane Kruger was Cannes' 2017 Best Actress winner for Fatih Akin's In the Fade / Aus dem Nichts. If Akin's German drama finds a U.S. distributor before the end of the year, Kruger could theoretically become the Isabelle Huppert of the 2017–2018 awards season – that is, in case the former does become a U.S. critics favorite while we stretch things a bit regarding the Kruger-Huppert commonalities. Just a bit, as both are European-born Best Actress Cannes winners who have been around for a while (in Huppert's case, for quite a while). Perhaps most importantly, like Huppert in Paul Verhoeven's Elle, Kruger plays a woman out for revenge in In the Fade. Diane Kruger-Isabelle Huppert 'differences' There is, however, one key difference between the two characters: in Elle, Huppert wants to avenge her own rape; in In the Fade, Kruger wants to avenge the death of her Turkish husband (Numan Acar) and their son (Rafael Santana) at the hands of white supremacist terrorists. Another key difference, this time about the Kruger-Huppert Cannes Film Festival connection: although Isabelle Huppert became a U.S. critics favorite – and later a Best Actress Oscar nominee – for her performance in Elle, her (unanimous) Best Actress Cannes win was for another movie, Michael Haneke's The Piano Teacher / La pianiste back in 2001. At that time, Huppert also became a U.S. critics favorite (winning Best Actress honors in San Diego and San Francisco; a runner-up in Los Angeles and New York), but, perhaps because of the psychological drama's sexually charged nature, she failed to receive a matching Oscar nod. Last year's Cannes Best Actress, by the way, was Jaclyn Jose for Brillante Mendoza's Philippine drama Ma' Rosa. Huppert had been in contention as well, as Elle was in the running for the Palme d'Or. Diane Kruger Best Actress Oscar nomination chances? A Best Actress nomination for Diane Kruger at the German Academy Awards (a.k.a. Lolas) – for her first German-language starring role – is all but guaranteed. Curiously, that would be her first. As for a Best Actress Oscar nod, that's less certain. For starters, unlike the mostly well-reviewed Elle, In the Fade has sharply divided critics. The Hollywood Reporter, for one, summarized Akin's film as a “thriller made riveting by an emotional performance from Diane Kruger,” while The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw called it a “mediocre revenge drama” with “a not particularly good” star turn. Besides, since the year 2000 just one “individual” Best Actress Cannes winner has gone on to receive an Oscar nomination for the same performance: Rooney Mara*, who, though one of the two leads in Todd Haynes' Carol (2011), was shortlisted in the Oscars' Best Supporting Actress category so as not to compete with her co-star and eventual Best Actress nominee Cate Blanchett. Then there's the special case of Penélope Cruz; the 2006 Best Actress Oscar nominee – for Pedro Almodóvar's Volver – was a Cannes winner as part of that family comedy-drama ensemble†. And finally, despite their Cannes Best Actress win for performances in (at least partly) English-language films, no less than seven other actresses have failed to be shortlisted for the Academy Awards this century. Björk, Dancer in the Dark (2000). Maggie Cheung, Clean (2004). Hanna Laslo, Free Zone (2005). Charlotte Gainsbourg, Antichrist (2009). Juliette Binoche, Certified Copy (2010). Kirsten Dunst, Melancholia (2011). Julianne Moore, Maps to the Stars (2014). Coincidentally, that same year Moore starred in Still Alice, which eventually earned her the Best Actress Oscar. Warner Bros. will be distributing In the Fade in Germany later this year. Regarding the Oscars, whether late in 2017 or late in 2018, seems like it would be helpful if Diane Kruger got a hold of Isabelle Huppert's – and/or Marion Cotillard's and Jean Dujardin's – U.S.-based awards season publicists. * Rooney Mara shared the 2011 Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Award with Emmanuelle Bercot for My King / Mon roi. † Also in the Cannes-winning Volver ensemble: Carmen Maura, Lola Dueñas, Blanca Portillo, Chus Lampreave, and Yohana Cobo. 'The Beguiled' trailer: Colin Farrell cast in the old Clint Eastwood role in Sofia Coppola's readaptation of Civil War-set, lust & circumstance drama. Sofia Coppola ends Cannes female drought About 13 years ago, Sofia Coppola became the first American woman to be shortlisted for the Best Director Academy Award – for the Tokyo-set drama Lost in Translation, starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. Coppola eventually lost in that category to Peter Jackson for the blockbuster The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, but she did take home that year's Best Original Screenplay Oscar statuette. There haven't been any other Oscar nominations since, but her father-daughter drama Somewhere, toplining Stephen Dorff and Elle Fanning, was the controversial Golden Lion winner at the 2010 Venice Film Festival. This year, Coppola has become only the second woman to win the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award – for The Beguiled, an American Civil War-set drama based on Thomas P. Cullinan's 1966 novel of the same name (originally published as A Painted Devil). With shades of Rumer Godden's Black Narcissus, The Beguiled follows a wounded Union soldier as he finds refuge at a girls' boarding school in Virginia. Sexual tension and assorted forms of pathological behavior ensue. Tenuous Cannes-Oscar Best Director connection From 2000 to 2016, 20 filmmakers† have taken home the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award. Of these, only four have gone on to receive matching Best Director Oscar nominations – but no wins: David Lynch, Mulholland Dr. (2001). Alejandro González Iñárritu, Babel (2006). Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007). Bennett Miller, Foxcatcher (2014). Four other Cannes Best Director winners were bypassed by the Academy even though their movies featured – at least a sizable chunk of – English-language dialogue: Joel Coen, The Man Who Wasn't There§ (2001). Paul Thomas Anderson, Punch-Drunk Love (2002). Gus Van Sant, Elephant (2004). Nicolas Winding Refn, Drive (2011). In other words, a Best Director Cannes Film Festival win is no guarantee of a Best Director Academy Award nomination. Ultimately, Sofia Coppola's chances of an Oscar nod in the Best Director category depend on how well The Beguiled is received among Los Angeles and New York film circles, and how commercially successful – for an “arthouse movie” – it turns out to be. † During that period, there were three Cannes Film Festival Best Director ties: 2001: Joel Coen for The Man Who Wasn't There§ & David Lynch for Mulholland Dr. 2002: Im Kwon-taek for Painted Fire & Paul Thomas Anderson for Punch-Drunk Love. 2016: Cristian Mungiu for Graduation & Olivier Assayas for Personal Shopper. Both films opened in the U.S. in spring 2017 and may thus be eligible for the upcoming awards season. § Ethan Coen co-directed The Man Who Wasn't There, but didn't receive credit in that capacity. 'The Beguiled' with Nicole Kidman. The Best Actress Oscar winner ('The Hours,' 2002) had two movies in the Cannes Film Festival's Official Competition; the other one was 'The Killing of the Secret Deer,' also with Colin Farrell. Moreover, Kidman was the recipient of Cannes' special 70th Anniversary Prize. 'Sly' & 'elegant' Also adapted by Sofia Coppola, The Beguiled will be distributed in the U.S. by Oscar veteran Focus Features (Brokeback Mountain, The Danish Girl). The film has generally received positive notices – e.g., “sly” and “elegant” in the words of Time magazine's Stephanie Zacharek – and could well become a strong awards season contender in various categories. The cast includes The Killing of a Sacred Deer actors Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell, in addition to Kirsten Dunst (the star of Coppola's Marie Antoinette), Somewhere actress Elle Fanning, Oona Laurence, Addison Riecke, Angourie Rice, and Emma Howard. As an aside, Cullinan's novel also served as the basis for Don Siegel's The Beguiled (1971), a Southern Gothic effort adapted by Irene Kamp and former Hollywood Ten member Albert Maltz. In the cast of what turned out to be a major box office flop: Clint Eastwood, Geraldine Page, Elizabeth Hartman, and Jo Ann Harris. Women directors at Cannes & the Oscars For the record, Soviet filmmaker Yuliya Solntseva was the Cannes Film Festival's first Best Director winner, for The Story of the Flaming Years back in 1961. The only woman to have directed a Palme d'Or winner is Jane Campion, for The Piano (1993). Early in 1994, Campion became the second woman to be shortlisted for an Academy Award in the Best Director category. The first one was Lina Wertmüller for Seven Beauties (1976). 'A Gentle Night' & 'Montparnasse Bienvenue' Qiu Yang's short film Palme d'Or winner A Gentle Night should be automatically eligible for the 2018 Academy Awards. But competition, as usual, will be fierce. In the last decade, the only short film Palme d'Or winner to have received an Oscar nomination is Juanjo Giménez Peña's Timecode (2016), in the Best Live Action Short Film category. This article was originally published at Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/). »

- Steph Mont.

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‘Glow’: Alison Brie Gets Slammed, Slapped and a ‘Crotch to Face’ in Behind-the-Scenes Video – Watch

20 June 2017 5:42 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“There’s a lot of crotch to face.”

Community’s” Alison Brie makes this observation in a behind-the-scenes sneak peek of Netflix’s new series “Glow,” which looks to be the most fun, spandex-laden series ever, and that includes superhero shows.

Read More: ‘Glow’ Trailer: Alison Brie Enters the Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling Ring for Netflix

The series is a fictional retelling of the rise of women’s wrestling in the 1980s. Brie stars as struggling actress Ruth Wilder, who gets her shot of stardom with Glow, the Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling. She’s part of an elite, dirty dozen of misfits who are all looking to take their frustrations in life and channel them into take-charge personas in the ring.

“Every woman has a wresting character sleeping inside of them,” adds Betty Gilpin, who plays Ruth’s chief rival, a former soap star named Debbie who took a break from acting to have a baby.

A few of the other more colorful wrestler names include Cherry Bang (Sydelle Noel) and Sheila the She Wolf (Gayle Rankin). Leading the pack is Marc Maron as Sam Sylvia, the has-been B-movie director with the vision for Glow.

The behind-the-scenes video also show how the actresses trained for what we presume are their wrestling debuts, taking hits, getting clotheslined, learning to flip, fall and flop with grace, all while having an armpit or crotch in their face.

The series was co-created by Liz Flahive and Carly Mensch, and executive produced by “Orange Is the New Black’s” Jenji Kohan. Take a look at the series below:

Glow” will release all 10 episodes of Season 1 on Friday, June 23.

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Related storiesNetflix: Full List of Movies Arriving in July 2017 Includes 'Rogue One' and 'Punch-Drunk Love'Netflix's Next Big Move? Hacking the Oscars'Gypsy' Review: Naomi Watts' Netflix Series is Impossibly Dull Given Who's Involved »

- Hanh Nguyen

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‘Better Call Saul’ Review: Season 3 Finale Proves A Good Man Knows When to Give Up

19 June 2017 8:20 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Last Week’S Review: Brace for Impact, It’s the Penultimate Episode of Season 3

Case Summary

It’s not always easy to tell how bad an accident is upon first glance, so for the past week we’ve been waiting to find out just how badly Kim was hurt following the crash at the end of “Fall.” Almost right away, we get our answer — beyond the car, Kim’s down one arm. “This one handed crap is going to get real old real fast,” she muses. The real blow appears to be to her spirit, but at least she’s committing to her recovery in the short term. (A movie binge can cure an awful lot of ills.)

While Kim might be injured, it’s Jimmy who’s truly shaken up by the accident. Blaming himself for the fact that Kim was pushing herself too hard, Jimmy resolves to take care of her and make good. His first major act is to surrender the office in which he once took such pride, greatly simplifying his life and Kim’s — then, he tries to make amends with Chuck, which leads to a heartbreaking scene where Chuck basically dismisses him from his life.

Lest you feel too much pity for Jimmy, he next tries to make things better for Irene, the sweet old woman from last week who he manipulated into accepting the Sandpiper settlement by turning her into a social pariah. Re-corking that genie proves pretty much impossible without desperate measures: In order to fix what he did, Jimmy has to expose his scheme in front of Irene’s entire retirement home community, sacrificing his Sandpiper payday and ruining any chance he had of resuming his elder law practice when he gets his license back.

It’s a rough break for Jimmy. But he’s having a much better day than others.

Oh, That’s Right, It’s a Period Piece

Blockbuster Video. Need we say more? For the record, here is a list of all the DVDs we saw on display in the New Releases section: “A Knight’s Tale,” the 40th anniversary edition of “Lawrence of Arabia,” the Philip Seymour Hoffman drama “Love Liza,” horror flick “The Mothman Prophecy,” and the Adam Sandler/Paul Thomas Anderson collaboration “Punch-Drunk Love.”

For the record, there may be some DVDs visible on the shelves that are not 100 percent period accurate — for example, Tim Burton’s “Big Fish” might have been present, a film which did not come out on DVD until April 2004. But if that’s the case, it’s a rare slip-up for a show that otherwise knows its period details. Seriously, a video store. Our early-2000s nostalgia is real.

“It’s From a Movie!”

Kim and Jimmy’s quiet conversation over “To Kill a Mockingbird,” invoking her childhood idealism for the law as practiced by Atticus Finch, offered more insight into Kim’s youth than we’ve gotten in quite some time. Maybe this is an indication that when she’s fully recovered, she’ll reapproach her own practice of the law? One can only hope.

Best Quote

“After… everything, I don’t give a shit about the office.”

— Jimmy

Jimmy and Kim’s post-accident discussion in the kitchen is the show at its most adult and pure — two grown-ups taking responsibility for their actions. It also contains the above line, which is basically the closest we’ve ever gotten to Jimmy telling Kim “I love you.” In that moment, the connection between Rhea Seehorn and Bob Odenkirk had more real passion than a hundred soap opera love scenes.

Remembering What Hasn’t Happened Yet (The “Breaking Bad” Tie-In)

It’s the moment we’ve been waiting for since our first glimpse of Mark Margolis in the “Saul” timeline — the cardiac event that eventually incapacitated the all-powerful Don Hector Salamanca. “Breaking Bad” fans never knew how, exactly, Hector ended up paralyzed in a wheelchair, but now we have the answer, thanks to Nacho’s patience with the long game. (If you want to know exactly how Nacho pulled this off, this Reddit thread has a pretty coherent breakdown of why Nacho swapping Hector’s medication for ibuprofen was effective.)

Nacho, of course, isn’t a player in the “Breaking Bad” era, so there’s still plenty of reason to be concerned about him. Especially considering…

Gus Watch

In the finale, it’s not so much about keeping our eye on Gus as who Gus is keeping his eyes on. That of course, would be Nacho, who seemed to get away with his pill-swapping scheme. But Gus is clearly suspicious and, more importantly, now has Mike on his payroll. Mike’s kept bigger secrets, but right now who knows exactly what is unclear.

What’s Up With Mike?

No clueJonathan Banks did not make an appearance this episode. Which makes sense for storytelling purposes, but it’s time to revive a complaint from last year’s Emmys season. Since Season 2, the more visible supporting actor contender has clearly been Michael McKean, who has gone un-nominated since the show’s beginnings. McKean getting overlooked was a shame last year — if it happens again this year, it’ll be a crime.

Brotherly Love

Every time it seems like the relationship between Jimmy and Chuck can’t get worse, we reach a new level. In this case, their final scene together goes beyond love and beyond hate: Chuck dismisses Jimmy with utter indifference. It’s something which clearly ends up tearing at Jimmy inside, but he accepts it, letting Chuck have the last word as he slinks away.

It’d be easy to believe that Chuck genuinely means everything he says to Jimmy — except that something about this encounter was clearly triggering, and within the next 24 hours Chuck completely backslides into his old patterns.

Earlier in the episode, director Peter Gould indulged in a bit of house porn when it came to Chuck’s fully restored home. This ended up making sense once Chuck began tearing away at his one refuge, the once-lovely home decorated by ex-wife Rebecca, now in ruin.

And then things got even worse.

In Conclusion, Your Honor

Better Call Saul” is all about the details, especially when it comes to episode titles. Nearly every week, in fact, attentive viewers will experience a moment of realization when it becomes clear why that episode got its name: A moment of dialogue, such as Episode 303, “Sunk Costs,” or a physical action, such as Episode 308, “Slip.”

These moments are never extremely subtle, instead often landing like a physical blow. But we maybe thought we understood why the season finale was called “Lantern” following the cold open, which gave us a bittersweet flashback to the brothers McGill, bonding over childhood favorite “The Adventures of Mabel.” But then we reached the ending, and the brutal final moments which awaited us.

The slow rise of the flames is a moment that is truly, definitively “Saul” at its best — quiet, yet horrific, and oh so grounded and real. Any long-time television fan knows that no one’s truly dead until you see the body. But as we prepare for the long wait for Season 4, we do so knowing that this time, the damage may truly be done. And it just speaks to the brilliance of the series, which keeps us hooked, tragedy after tragedy.

Grade: A

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Related stories'Preacher' Review: A Bloody Search for God in New Orleans Uncovers a More Focused and Colorful Season 2'Better Call Saul': The 7 Times Jimmy and Kim Kissed On Screen, And How That Makes It The Most Rewarding Romance on TVThe 20 Best-Directed TV Drama Series of the 21st Century, Ranked »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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‘Better Call Saul’ Review: Season 3 Finale Proves A Good Man Knows When to Give Up

19 June 2017 8:20 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Last Week’S Review: Brace for Impact, It’s the Penultimate Episode of Season 3

Case Summary

It’s not always easy to tell how bad an accident is upon first glance, so for the past week we’ve been waiting to find out just how badly Kim was hurt following the crash at the end of “Fall.” Almost right away, we get our answer — beyond the car, Kim’s down one arm. “This one handed crap is going to get real old real fast,” she muses. The real blow appears to be to her spirit, but at least she’s committing to her recovery in the short term. (A movie binge can cure an awful lot of ills.)

While Kim might be injured, it’s Jimmy who’s truly shaken up by the accident. Blaming himself for the fact that Kim was pushing herself too hard, Jimmy resolves to take »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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Adam Sandler is getting high praise and even Oscar buzz for his performance in The Meyerowitz Stories

25 May 2017 5:01 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Adam Sandler is getting Oscar buzz. No, you don’t need new glasses, but consider checking outside for any flying pigs. His new Netflix produced film The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected) received a 4 minute standing ovation at the Cannes Film Festival.

Sandler’s performance is receiving rave reviews, and the film is currently sitting at a 93% Fresh Rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Here is the kicker: Almost every single review states that Adam Sandler is one of, if not the best part of the movie. His performance is being so highly-praised, in fact, that many are thinking that the actor could win the Best Actor award at Cannes.

Also, almost unbelievably and certainly unexpectedly, the actor is now getting Oscar buzz. Look at this excerpt from Variety’s review of the film from Cannes:

“With no shtick to fall back on, Sandler is forced to act, and it’s a glorious thing to watch… »

- Jordan Jones

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Adam Sandler Gets 4-Minute Standing Ovation at Cannes, Is Oscar Next?

24 May 2017 5:34 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Adam Sandler received a four-minute standing ovation (yes, you read that correctly a 4 minute standing ovation) at the Cannes Film Festival on the French Riviera. Sandler has come a long way since nudie magazine day and this is actually his second time gaining praise at Cannes. The first time was 15 years ago for his highly underrated performance in Paul Thomas Anderson's Punch-Drunk Love. The late Roger Ebert even praised Sandler's performance in the movie stating that Sandler had "unexpected depth" and that he has "darkness, obsession, and power." This is all true, so where did that version of Sandler disappear to? If Sunday's standing ovation has anything to say about it, that Sandler is back.

The ovation came after a screening of Noah Baumbach's The Meyerowitz Stories, which is competing for a Palm d'Or this year at Cannes, the highest honor given at the event. The movie was »

- MovieWeb

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Cannes Trends: Adam Sandler, Virtual Reality and Metal Detectors

22 May 2017 9:30 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Cannes Film Festival continues until Sunday, but as film buyers and sellers begin to depart, critics are taking a deep breath at the mid-point to assess the notable people and trends that have marked the festival so far.

Adam Sandler

Just last month, the straight-to-Netflix release of “Sandy Wexler” seemed to reinforce the idea that one-time box office draw Adam Sandler planned to spend the next few years making nothing but lazy, low-brow comedies for the streaming service. And then Noah Baumbach’s stellar “The Meyerowitz Stories” materialized out of nowhere, offering Sandler his best role since “Punch-Drunk Love” (which competed in Cannes 15 years earlier), and though Netflix bought it, Cannes proves a performance this good belongs on the big screen.

The Virtual Reality Revolution

“Carne y Arena,” a six-and-a-half-minute Vr installation created by director Alejandro G. Inarritu, turns out to be the revelation of the festival. It’s »

- Peter Debruge and Owen Gleiberman

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Adam Sandler on ‘The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)’ and Therapy: ‘I Don’t Want to Let Anybody Down’

21 May 2017 1:49 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Amid all the poorly received Netflix Originals, let us not forget that Adam Sandler dabbles in more serious fare from time to time. It doesn’t always work out — “The Cobbler” was among the most pilloried films of 2014 — but Noah Baumbach’s “The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)” has emerged as an early favorite at Cannes. Sandler spoke about the film during a press conference at the festival, saying that he “couldn’t believe we were doing this movie” when he first read the script.

Read More: Cannes Review: A Great Adam Sandler Performance Makes ‘The Meyerowitz Stories’ One of Noah Baumbach’s Best

Ben Stiller and Dustin Hoffman co-star as Sandler’s brother and father, respectively, with Emma Thompson playing Hoffman’s third and current wife. “It’s different for a comedian when you get an offer like this,” Sandler said. “My first thought is, ‘I don’t want »

- Michael Nordine

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Cannes 2017: The Meyerowitz Stories review: Dir. Noah Baumbach (2017)

21 May 2017 9:44 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

The Meyerowitz Stories review: Noah Baumbach delivers Netflix’s second film at the 2017 Cannes Festival, a family comedy full of edge that delivers in spades.

The Meyerowitz Stories review by Paul Heath at the 2017 Festival de Cannes.

The Meyerowitz Stories review

“He has to be great artist. Otherwise he’s just a prick.” Just one of the many witty lines delivered in the second of Netflix’s two debuting movies at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival; Noah Baumbach’s The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected), an interesting family comedy focusing on the estranged Meyerovitz’s of the title.

Patriarch Howard (Dustin Hoffman) is said artist, retired living in New York City with third wife Maureen (Emma Thompson), an apparent alcoholic. The film stars with an introduction to Danny (Adam Sandler), Howard’s son from his first marriage, attempting to locate a parking space (with limited success) in downtown Manhattan. With him »

- Paul Heath

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Cannes Film Review: ‘The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)’

21 May 2017 4:48 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It’s not easy being raised the child of a celebrated artist. Truth be told, it’s not so great being raised the child of a minor, mostly unrecognized artist either, which is closer to the dynamic writer-director Noah Baumbach wants to explore with “The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected),” a chatty New York comedy featuring the best role in 15 years for Adam Sandler. It’s the story of a messed-up clan that seems never to have heard of therapy, but could definitely use it, and the family crisis that conveniently allows them all to say their peace.

Sandler plays Danny Meyerowitz, the oldest son of seventysomething New York sculptor Harold Meyerowitz (Dustin Hoffman, who’s always been funny, but gets to really sink his teeth into some of his best material here). With no shtick to fall back on, Sandler is forced to act, and it’s a glorious »

- Peter Debruge

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