6.9/10
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283 user 111 critic

The Last Castle (2001)

A court-martialed General rallies together twelve hundred inmates to rise against the corrupt system that put him away.

Director:

Writers:

(story), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »

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ON DISC
1 win & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Dellwo
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Duffy (as Samuel Ball)
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Cutbush
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George W. Scott ...
Thumper
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Beaupre
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Enriquez
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Maurice Bullard ...
Sgt. McLaren
Nick Kokich ...
Pvt. Niebolt
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Storyline

When three star General Irwin is transferred to a maximum security military prison, its warden, Colonel Winter, can't hide his admiration towards the highly decorated and experienced soldier. Irwin has been stripped of his rank for disobedience in a mission, but not of fame. Colonel Winter, who runs the prison with an iron fist, deeply admires the General, but works with completely different methods in order to keep up discipline. After a short while, Irwin can feel Winter's unjust treatment of the inmates. He decides to teach Winter a lesson by taking over command of the facility and thus depriving him of his smug attitude. When Winter decides to participate in what he still thinks of as a game, it may already be too late to win. Written by Julian Reischl <julianreischl@mac.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A castle can only have one king

Genres:

Action | Drama | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

19 October 2001 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Castle  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$72,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$7,088,213 (USA) (19 October 2001)

Gross:

$18,208,078 (USA) (14 December 2001)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

| |

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Irwin tapes pictures of his grandchild on the wall of his cell, they are pictures of Director Rod Lurie's son Hunter. See more »

Goofs

A few minutes after the office of Col. Winters is set afire and then extinguished by the sprinkler system, Winters examines the damage and there is no smoke or steam rising from the debris. See more »

Quotes

Irwin: [declining fellow inmates' suggestion to have Col. Winter reported to his superiors for his crimes] I'm not fighting anyone or anything, anymore.
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Connections

Referenced in Flushed Away (2006) See more »

Soundtracks

Chiseled in Stone
Written & Performed by Dean Hall
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User Reviews

 
Despite the setting, this movie has little to do with prisons.
2 March 2012 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Despite the setting, this movie has little to do with prisons. Rod Lurie's vision, combined with the extraordinary talents of Robert Redford and James Gandolfini, is a morality play set in the most unlikely of locations. We have a man who has risen to the height of his potential, the Colonel, who will never advance above that rank, and is bitter with his role in life. He is an administrator among soldiers who wanted to be a soldier and was instead given the task of maintaining order at a prison. That he could show leadership by helping these men to regain their self respect and dignity has escaped him, and he is content to amuse himself by creating situations which lead to the prisoners becoming the animals he believes them to be. When the General comes to his prison, he thinks he has found a kindred spirit who can appreciate his manipulation of the men. To his disappointment, he finds the General a thoughtful and honorable soldier who has chosen to accept his punishment without excuse or explanation. While the Colonel must fight to maintain control, his methods and his intellect lack humanity and understanding. The General is given control by the prisoners because of his intellect and understanding. He offers the prisoners the one thing the warden cannot, dignity. Rated R for language and violence, this film is not for everyone, and certainly not for the very young. It is, however, an essential element in the creation of a leader, and should be seen by anyone who aspires to lead.


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