The Time Machine
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 2002

20 items from 2016


Time Travel on TV Today, Ranked From Least to Most Tricky

5 September 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Time is not on our side, especially in the era of “peak TV.” Perhaps this is why networks are hopping onto the time travel bandwagon. At this year’s network upfront presentations in May, four of the five broadcast networks plugged shows that revolved around a time travel element at their core.

Taking journeys through the fourth dimension is a concept that has appeared in fiction since the late 19th century, popularized by H.G. Wells’ novel “The Time Machine.” The continued appeal of time travel boils down to wish fulfillment: the desire to visit other eras like a tourist, the yearning to relive or change the past, the curiosity about the future and the ability to squeeze more experiences into our ephemeral lives.

Although Stephen Hawking and Carl Sagan disagree on whether time travel will someday be possible based on our apparent lack of visitors from the future, that hasn »

- Ben Travers, Liz Shannon Miller, Hanh Nguyen and Michael Schneider

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Time Travel on TV Today, Ranked From Least to Most Tricky

5 September 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Time is not on our side, especially in the era of “peak TV.” Perhaps this is why networks are hopping onto the time travel bandwagon. At this year’s network upfront presentations in May, four of the five broadcast networks plugged shows that revolved around a time travel element at their core.

Taking journeys through the fourth dimension is a concept that has appeared in fiction since the late 19th century, popularized by H.G. Wells’ novel “The Time Machine.” The continued appeal of time travel boils down to wish fulfillment: the desire to visit other eras like a tourist, the yearning to relive or change the past, the curiosity about the future and the ability to squeeze more experiences into our ephemeral lives.

Although Stephen Hawking and Carl Sagan disagree on whether time travel will someday be possible based on our apparent lack of visitors from the future, that hasn »

- Ben Travers, Liz Shannon Miller, Hanh Nguyen and Michael Schneider

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The History of Time Travel TV – 11.22.63

15 August 2016 3:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Ah. Time Travel. An indispensable staple of science fiction. Where would we be without Back to the Future, The Time Machine, Twelve Monkeys, Looper, The Terminator, Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure, Source Code, Hot Tub Time Machine and Austin Powers? Television has also mined time travel for all it’s worth, either as the central conceit […]

The post The History of Time Travel TV – 11.22.63 appeared first on HeyUGuys. »

- Dave Roper

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A celebration of disembodied brains and heads in the movies

13 July 2016 8:12 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ryan Lambie Jul 14, 2016

We take a look at some of the most memorable and freaky floating brains and flying heads in the history of cinema...

Nb: The following contains spoilers for The Brain From The Planet Arous and Prometheus.

For some reason we've yet to discover, cinema has, for decades, been home to all manner of sentient, disembodied heads and floating brains. Note that we’re not talking about decapitations here - though goodness knows that cinema is home to plenty of those, from Japanese samurai epics to modern slasher horrors.

No, we’re talking about movies where heads and brains remain sentient even when they’re stuffed into jars or colossal things made of stone. Sometimes used for comedic effect, at other times for shock value, they’re a surprisingly common phenomenon in the movies. Here, we celebrate a few of our absolute favourites - though you’re sure »

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Take A Trip In This Video Essay About The 1960 & 2002 Versions Of ‘The Time Machine’

28 June 2016 2:37 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Let’s travel back to the year 2002. A weird and magical time where Guy Pearce was the original Colin Farrell (a talented, handsome up-and-comer getting plugged into leading-man blockbuster roles that squander his gifts) and Jeremy Irons could be convinced to dress up like a White Walker. That’s right, we’re talking about the forgettable remake […]

The post Take A Trip In This Video Essay About The 1960 & 2002 Versions Of ‘The Time Machine’ appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Ryan Oliver

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TV Series Venture Into Fourth Dimension for 2016-17 Season

9 June 2016 8:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Television is hooked on time travel. At this spring’s TV upfronts, every major network except CBS announced that it will air a show that involves time travel during the 2016-17 television season.

NBC will debut “Timeless,” a drama about a group of people who go back in time to alter history by stopping the Hindenburg disaster. Fox has set a midseason premiere for the time-travel comedy “Making History,” executive produced by Phil Lord and Chris Miller, co-starring Adam Pally and Leighton Meester.

ABC will air “Time After Time,” the television adaptation of a book that speculates over what would have happened had H.G. Wells — who is widely credited for popularizing the idea of time travel with his 1895 novel “The Time Machine” — actually had the ability to travel through time. And The CW has “Frequency,” an adaptation of the 2000 thriller about a father and son communicating across time with this use of a ham radio, »

- Seth Kelley

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Wayward Pines Season 2 Episode 2 Review – ‘Blood Harvest’

6 June 2016 10:35 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Martin Carr reviews the second episode of Wayward Pines season 2…

I was wrong and admit it. Whatever my misgivings about last week’s opener things have changed down in Wayward Pines. That needless re-tread which constituted episode one, left no time for progression, proved noticeably useless and removed any tension with devastating efficiency. There was no time for Jason Patric to look anything but confused before credits rolled and Wayward Pines was no more. This week however things are different.

We the audience were treated to copious amounts of dramatic meat on the bone. Which included heavy gun fire, psychological stand offs and aberrational cadavers ago go. We got to see more of the unbalanced Jason fronting off against Patric’s Yedlin, who clearly was in no mood for games. Which in turn gave us a better understanding of character dynamics and more entertainment. It uncovered those who run the show to have blatant inadequacies, »

- Amie Cranswick

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Alan Young, DuckTales and Mr. Ed Star, Passes Away at 96

20 May 2016 6:15 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

The film and TV world lost another one of its beloved greats today, in a year where the deaths of iconic stars seem more commonplace than ever. Alan Young, who played Wilbur Post on Mr. Ed and voiced the iconic Scrooge McDuck for three decades, passed away this morning at the age of 96. The actor had been living at the Motion Picture and Television Fund facility in Woodland Hills, California at the time of his passing.

Alan Young was born in North Shields, Northumberland, England in 1919, before relocating to Edinburgh and later to Vancouver, British Columbia as a small child. He suffered from asthma as a young boy, which caused him to be bedridden for much of his childhood, when he took up a strong interest in radio. He had already become an accomplished radio performer by the age of 13, and at 17 years of age, he started writing and performing »

- MovieWeb

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Mister Ed Star Alan Young Dead at 96

20 May 2016 5:26 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Comedic actor Alan Young, who for six seasons starred opposite a talking horse in the classic ’60s sitcom Mister Ed, died Tuesday of natural causes. He was 96.

On Mister Ed, which ran on CBS from 1961-1966, Young portrayed architect Wilbur Post. Prior to that he was best known for headlining CBS’ The Alan Young Show, which netted him a Best Actor Emmy.

His other TV credits included guest appearances on The Love Boat, Murder She Wrote, St. Elsewhere, Party of Five and ER. On the big screen, he co-starred in such films as Gentlemen Marry Brunettes, Tom Thumb, The Time Machine »

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Alan Young, Star of Mister Ed, Dies at 96

20 May 2016 3:40 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Alan Young, a veteran actor who played Wilbur Post on the hit sitcom Mister Ed, died Thursday at the Motion Picture and Television Home in Woodland Hills, Calif. He was 96. Young died peacefully in his sleep of natural causes, surrounded by his adult children, according to the Motion Picture & Television Fund, which announced his passing. Young starred on the CBS comedy for five seasons from 1961-66, playing the married architect who owned a talking horse named Mr. Ed (voiced by Allan "Rocky" Lane). In 1995, Young opened up to People about his time on the show and working with his equine costar, »

- Aaron Couch

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Alan Young, Star of Mister Ed, Dies at 96

20 May 2016 3:40 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Alan Young, a veteran actor who played Wilbur Post on the hit sitcom Mister Ed, died Thursday at the Motion Picture and Television Home in Woodland Hills, Calif. He was 96. Young died peacefully in his sleep of natural causes, surrounded by his adult children, according to the Motion Picture & Television Fund, which announced his passing. Young starred on the CBS comedy for five seasons from 1961-66, playing the married architect who owned a talking horse named Mr. Ed (voiced by Allan "Rocky" Lane). In 1995, Young opened up to People about his time on the show and working with his equine costar, »

- Aaron Couch

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Alan Young, Star of Mister Ed, Dies at 96

20 May 2016 3:40 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Alan Young, a veteran actor who played Wilbur Post on the hit sitcom Mister Ed, died Thursday at the Motion Picture and Television Home in Woodland Hills, Calif. He was 96. Young died peacefully in his sleep of natural causes, surrounded by his adult children, according to the Motion Picture & Television Fund, which announced his passing. Young starred on the CBS comedy for five seasons from 1961-66, playing the married architect who owned a talking horse named Mr. Ed (voiced by Allan "Rocky" Lane). In 1995, Young opened up to People about his time on the show and working with his equine costar, »

- Aaron Couch

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Alan Young, ‘Mister Ed’ Star, Dies at 96

20 May 2016 2:51 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Alan Young, who gamely played straight man to a talking horse for five years in classic sitcom “Mr. Ed,” died Thursday at the Motion Picture and Television Home in Woodland Hills, Calif. He was 96.

On the series, which ran from 1961-66 on CBS, Young played architect Wilbur Post, who was married to Carol (played by Connie Hines, who died in 2009) and kept a horse, Mr. Ed, in their suburban stable. Mr. Ed, voiced by Allan “Rocky” Lane, would speak only to Wilbur, but given Mr. Ed’s rather outlandish personality and the superbly mild affect of Young’s Wilbur, just who owned whom could occasionally be a matter of debate.

Young also voiced Scrooge McDuck and numerous other animated characters, as well as guesting on dozens of TV shows.

In 2005 “Mr. Ed” won a TV Land Award for most heart-warming pet-owner interaction. Young also directed four episodes of “Mr. Ed. »

- Carmel Dagan

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John Ostrander: Back to the Future Tense

8 May 2016 5:00 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

There’s a lot of time travel going on in pop culture these days. The CW has DC’s Legends of Tomorrow where a rag-tag group of misfits travel around with Doctor Who, excuse me, Rip Hunter Time Master, as he tries to stop the immortal villain, Vandal Savage, from killing his family. Oh, and to prevent Savage from really messing up the world… but mostly to save his own family.

In general, I like time travel stories and have ever since I saw The Time Machine (the 1960 one with Rod Taylor, not the 2002 version with Guy Pearce). A great variation on the H.G. Wells story was Time After Time, where H.G. Wells (played by Malcolm McDowell) comes to (then) modern day San Francisco chasing Jack the Ripper (David Warner) and encounters the ever adorable Mary Steenburgen.

I like time travel stories in movies, books, comics, and so on. One »

- John Ostrander

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Watch: Trailer for Indie Documentary 'How to Build a Time Machine'

17 April 2016 10:46 AM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

"Believe it or not, I'm from the future and I've come here to try and save your life." Now this is something quite unique. How to Build a Time Machine is a documentary that follows two different men as they set out on a journey to build their own time machines. One of them is a theoretical physicist, the other is a stop motion animator, and they both seem inspired by The Time Machine book/original movie. This is a very small indie documentary - though I can't really tell if it's a mockumentary with fictional setups designed to feel real, or actually a real doc where they found two people who are really trying to build time machines. It might be the latter. Either way, this looks fascinating and intriguing and worth watching. Take a look below. Here's the official trailer for Jay Cheel's How to Build a Time Machine, »

- Alex Billington

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‘How to Build a Time Machine’ Trailer: Two Guys Set Out to Build a You-Know-What

15 April 2016 3:00 PM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

How to Build a Time Machine, the new documentary from director Jay Cheel, looks fascinating, following two men whose lives were forever changed by H.G. WellsThe Time Machine. One has spent over a decade building a replica of the time travel device from the 1960 film adaptation. The other is a theoretical physicist who read […]

The post ‘How to Build a Time Machine’ Trailer: Two Guys Set Out to Build a You-Know-What appeared first on /Film. »

- Jacob Hall

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The 35 Best Time Travel Movies Ever, Ranked

1 April 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

There isn't one person out there who wouldn't give anything for a chance to travel back in time. To right a wrong or relive a favorite moment.

Hollywood has capitalized on this universal truth for years, with everything from "The Time Machine" to "Back to the Future." The genre has also given us time loops, which can ruin your do-over day (see "Source Code") or make each one increasingly better ("Groundhog Day").

In honor of "Source Code" turning five years old this year, here are the big screen's 35 best trips through time.

»

- Phil Pirrello

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Ed Catto: Time Won’t Let Me

28 March 2016 5:00 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

When I applied to University of North Carolina (Unc) Graduate School of Business to earn my Mba, one of the application’s essay questions asked “If you were go back into time to the founding of this university, what three items would you bring with you?”

I imagine the purpose of this was to discern candidates’ true character based on which items were most important to them. I bet there were a lot of answers that listed items like family photos or the Bible. I took a different approach. Having grown up on a steady diet of time travel comics and stories (most notably Mark Twain’s A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court) I interpreted the question in a different way. I answered it by thinking about the three items that would have the greatest positive impact on history. One item I recall bringing back in time (in »

- Ed Catto

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Judd Apatow: 'Love' was made for the Netflix binge, and 'Girls' should be weekly

17 February 2016 7:10 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Yesterday, I published my review of Netflix's Love, one of my favorite new shows of the year so far. (Its first season debuts Friday.) A romantic comedy about a walking disaster of a woman (Gillian Jacobs) and the nice guy (Paul Rust) who falls for her, it was co-created by Rust, Lesley Arfin, and Judd Apatow, who between Freaks and Geeks, Girls, and his many movies (including Trainwreck, whose title he says he lifted from this project), has plenty of experience finding the most mortifying aspects of interpersonal relationships. At press tour last month, Apatow and I spoke about the Netflix experience and the many ways TV has changed since his days on Freaks and Geeks and The Larry Sanders Show, why he thinks comedy episodes shouldn't be limited to 30 minutes, how Jacobs (who had a recurring role on Girls last season) wound up in Love, and a lot more. »

- Alan Sepinwall

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Cool Stuff: Julien Loïs’ ‘The Time Machine’ Print

21 January 2016 3:00 PM, PST | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Back in 2002, Guy Pearce starred in an adaptation of H.G. Wells‘ classic, revered sci-fi novel The Time Machine. But before that, 1960 brought an adaptation of the book to the big screen from George Pal, who also directed the original big screen adaptation of War of the Worlds. Now Nautilus Art Prints is releasing […]

The post Cool Stuff: Julien Loïs’ ‘The Time Machine’ Print appeared first on /Film. »

- Ethan Anderton

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 2002

20 items from 2016


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