6.5/10
105
3 user 4 critic

The Text of Light (1974)

Time-lapse photography of books, paintings, reflections, and light falling on textures, shot entirely through a glass ashtray.

Director:

Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

Stan Brakhage films the birth of his first child, Myrrena.

Director: Stan Brakhage
Stars: Jane Brakhage, Myrrena Brakhage, Stan Brakhage
Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

A visual representation, in four parts, of one man's internalization of "The Divine Comedy." Hell is a series of multicolored brush strokes against a white background; the speed of the ... See full summary »

Director: Stan Brakhage
Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  
Director: Stan Brakhage
Eraserhead (1977)
Fantasy | Horror | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

Henry Spencer tries to survive his industrial environment, his angry girlfriend, and the unbearable screams of his newly born mutant child.

Director: David Lynch
Stars: Jack Nance, Charlotte Stewart, Allen Joseph
Edit

Storyline

Time-lapse photography of books, paintings, reflections, and light falling on textures, shot entirely through a glass ashtray.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Edit

Details

Country:

Release Date:

26 October 1974 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A Man, A Movie Camera and an Ashtray
6 August 2006 | by (Toronto, Canada) – See all my reviews

This 71-minute effort is one of Stan Brakhage's most enjoyable films. It is a "chance" study of light refracted from a crystal ashtray. With its extreme closeups of the prismatic reflections, this movie creates a micro-universe all its own, which has no relationship whatever with our physical world. In fact I am reminded of the similarly wonderful films of Jim Davis, whose prismatic works also give a sense of weightlessness and otherworldly feel.

But for all that, Brakhage refuses to turn this into a "head" film. Its choppy editing discourages us from surrendering ourselves completely in this world. As the film seems to form its own "chapters" by the way the light shapes and colours begin to coalesce, its rhythm is interrupted by a hard cut and several frames of black before we continue to a different composition. (One wonders therefore, if we are seeing this film precisely in the order it was shot, or in how Brakhage discovered the effects.) Personally, I wouldn't have minded to have been lost completely in this universe, but the choppy editing perhaps allows the camera to be a slave to the subject, rather than the traditional film-making case of manipulating the subject for the good of the camera. In that regard, TEXT OF LIGHT treats its subject matter as though it were a living thing, and the camera thusly records whatever messages it desires to share.

In any event, this film is a joy... these 71 minutes go fast.


3 of 4 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss The Text of Light (1974) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page