6.8/10
3,970
66 user 43 critic

Scotland, Pa. (2001)

A modernized retelling of "MacBeth" set in 1970s suburban Pennsylvania. Joe McBeth, an unambitious hamburger stand employee, is driven to success by his scheming wife.

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2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Joe 'Mac' McBeth (as James LeGros)
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Malcolm Duncan (as Thomas Guiry)
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Stacy (Hippie #1)
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Hector (Hippie #2) (as Timothy Speed Levitch)
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Jesse (Hippie #3)
Geoff Dunsworth ...
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Nicola Lipman ...
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Storyline

Joe McBeth is a hard-working but unambitious doofus who toils at a hamburger stand alongside his wife Pat, who has a significant edge in the brains department. Pat is convinced she could do a lot better with the place than their boss Norm Duncan is doing, so she works up a plan to usurp Norm, convincing Mac to rob the restaurant's safe and then murder Norm, using the robbery as a way of throwing the police off their trail. Though two stoners and a would-be fortune teller warn Mac that bad luck awaits him, he gathers his courage and goes through with his wife's scheme. At first, things seem to have gone just as Pat hoped, and after Norm's sons sell the restaurant to the McBeths (they pay for it with the money they stole from Norm), business takes off. But vegetarian police detective McDuff is convinced there's foul play at the new center of the fast food universe, and when the McBeths fear that fry cook Banco knows more than he's letting on, Mac takes charge in the plotting department ... Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Greasy Spoon. Bloody Murder. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Crime

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language, some nudity, drug content and brief violence
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Details

Country:

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Language:

Release Date:

22 January 2001 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Listeia... sketi tragodia  »

Filming Locations:


Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$43,366 (USA) (8 February 2002)

Gross:

$384,098 (USA) (28 June 2002)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Among the 1970s trends, fads and inventions depicted in the film are: drive-thru restaurants, vegetarianism, Yahtzee, chicken bites with dipping sauces, tanning salons, the Magic 8 Ball, "MAD" Magazine (with the folding back-page pictures), fondue and streaking. See more »

Goofs

At the beginning of the movie, Pat's "perfect" soft ice cream cone is half as tall and not nearly as shapely when she pulls it from the machine as when she lifts it up to show Doug. See more »

Quotes

Joe 'Mac' McBeth: I love your cones, baby.
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Crazy Credits

This Film Is Dedicated to the Cast and Crew See more »

Connections

Version of Shakespeare: The Animated Tales: Twelfth Night (1992) See more »

Soundtracks

I'm Not Lisa
Written by Eddy Miriam
Performed by Jessi Colter
Published by Universal Songs of Polygram International, Inc. (BMI)
Courtesy of Capitol Nashville
Under License from EMI-Capitol Music Special Markets
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User Reviews

 
Duncan Donuts...
18 February 2002 | by (hiding under my seat) – See all my reviews

I really didn't get the "Duncan Donuts" gag until I sat down to write this brief review. It's that kind of movie, I guess: it is smarter than you think, but in ways that aren't necessarily very illuminating to the core of the drama.

This take on Shakespeare's MacBeth is both lightweight and light on its feet. It doesn't take itself very seriously but it takes what it wants from the material and spins it into an unexpected and hard to categorize movie. Think "Dazed and Confused" meets the Bard and you're getting pretty close to the mark, but it's campier than that, not as heartfelt, more smart-alecky. There's a little Twin Peaks bound up in the recipe, as well.

Though the material is not as well-crafted as, say, "Shakespeare in Love", the sloppy, homemade quality almost becomes its central aesthetic. It feels like something you'd dream up on a Friday night sitting around a hookah with your best friends, and by Saturday morning nobody could remember quite what you were talking about.

Even though the film utterly lacks the air of serious drama that one normally expects in a rendition of a Shakespearian tragedy, one can't help but wonder if the slapdash charms of this production might not actually lie closer to what versions Shakespeare himself might have seen produced at the Globe...rowdy, loose, untamed entertainment that races from one side of the stage to the other without pausing to ask what its all about.


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