The Royal Tenenbaums
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

14 items from 2016


The 20 Best Voice Performances of the Last 20 Years

13 July 2016 11:03 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Movies’ voice performances used to be something of an afterthought, at least for audiences. Most people have seen “The Little Mermaid,” but few could tell you the name of the actress who breathed life into Ariel. (Her name is Jodie Benson.)

That’s changed. Dreamworks and the growing legion of Disney imitators realized there was real commercial value in casting celebrities for animated movies. (See: Martin Scorsese as a fish with huge eyebrows in “Shark Tale.”) And, as technology developed a life of its own, the sound of a recognizable human voice has grown especially comforting.

These days, we don’t need to call anyone to have a conversation with our phones. And yet, even in an age when computers can generate photorealistic people, the fully human voice is still inimitable. It’s safe to say that Siri has never made anybody cry (unless it was frustration), but Scarlett Johansson »

- David Ehrlich, Kate Halliwell, Steve Greene, Russell Goldman, Ben Travers, Zack Sharf, Chris O'Falt and Kyle Kizu

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Posterized July 2016: ‘Ghostbusters,’ ‘Equals,’ ‘Star Trek Beyond,’ and More

5 July 2016 11:56 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

“Don’t Judge a Book by Its Cover” is a proverb whose simple existence proves the fact impressionable souls will do so without fail. This monthly column focuses on the film industry’s willingness to capitalize on this truth, releasing one-sheets to serve as not representations of what audiences are to expect, but as propaganda to fill seats. Oftentimes they fail miserably.

This month is the epitome of summer blockbuster season with a couple kids films, a couple attempts at old school epics, some comedies, some actioners, and a sparse few adult-oriented indies to provide a well-needed counter to the explosions and slapstick. We’re still inundated with sequels (four on this post alone) and reboots (two), but as long as we buy tickets they’ll continue coming — louder, brighter, and vapid.

So let’s try and give some love to the smaller films. Take the kids to a matinee »

- Jared Mobarak

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From ‘The Bfg’ to ‘Matilda’: How 5 Roald Dahl Books Landed on the Big Screen

29 June 2016 4:19 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Roald Dahl famously loathed all the movie adaptations of his books, including the 1971 classic “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” starring Gene Wilder. So when the beloved author died in 1990, his widow Felicity (who goes by Liccy) was torn about what to do with his catalogue. It was a time, following the hit comedy “Home Alone,” where the major studios were vigorously chasing family-friendly tales, and many of Dahl’s stories fit the bill. But Liccy didn’t want celebrated bestsellers such as “Matilda” or “James and the Giant Peach” falling into the wrong hands.

Dahl’s publisher at Penguin Books set up a few meetings, and she eventually connected with literary agent Michael Siegel. They bonded right away. “I don’t want there to be bad movies,” Liccy told him. They came up with an unorthodox, boutique approach. “Rather than sell the stories directly to the studios, we would »

- Ramin Setoodeh

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‘The Missing Ingredient’ Exclusive Trailer: How Does One Create a New York Institution?

27 June 2016 2:45 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Michael Sparaga’s upcoming documentary “The Missing Ingredient: What Is The Recipe For Success?” is an insightful exploration into New York City restaurant culture and what exactly it takes to become an institution in such a cut-throat environment. In order to get to the bottom of this inquiry, Sparanga focuses on two restaurants. The first is Gino’s, an Upper East Side fixture that’s been around for over half a century. It has a fiercely loyal clientele and has hosted a number of remarkable regulars over the years, including Frank Sinatra, Sophia Loren, and John Lennon. Its iconic zebra wallpaper inspired Woody Allen and Wes Anderson to feature it in their films “Mighty Aphrodite” and “The Royal Tenenbaums.”

Read More: 10 Must-See Documentaries at Doc NYC 2015

Charles Devigne, owner of Midtown eatery Pescatore, has struggled to survive in his ever-changing neighborhood. Determined to engineer his restaurant into a institution, Devigne »

- Vikram Murthi

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Wes Anderson’s ‘Bottle Rocket’ Short Film: Watch the 13 Minute Clip That Launched His Career

25 June 2016 3:28 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In 1992 a relatively unknown Wes Anderson shot the 13-minute short film, “Bottle Rocket.” Co-written by Anderson and Owen Wilson, the quirky black and white film, set to a snazzy Jazz score, showed brothers Owen and Luke Wilson as thieves in training.

The short was shown at the 1994 Sundance Film Festival and received critical praise. Two years later, Anderson took this piece and created a full feature of the same name, again starring the Wilson brothers.

The film followed Anthony (Luke), recently released from a mental hospital after having a nervous breakdown, who joins his friend Dignan (Owen), as they hatch a scheme for a yet-unspecified crime spree that involves one of their former boss’.

Read More: ‘Watership Down’: Wes Anderson, Guillermo del Toro & More Describe Story’s Impact Ahead Of New Miniseries

The 1996 film generated great buzz and launched the careers of Anderson and the Wilsons.

From there, the »

- Liz Calvario

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Clip and images from season 3 of All Hail King Julien

15 June 2016 12:46 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

With season three of DreamWorks Animation’s All Hail King Julien set to premiere on Netflix this Friday (June 17th), we’ve got a batch of images from the show, along with a clip that sees Princess Julienne (Angelica Huston) and Prince Barty (John Michael Higgins), King Julien’s dramatic and needy parents, arriving for unannounced for a royal visit. Check them out here…

This season, alongside Danny Jacobs’ Emmy®-winning comedic work as King Julien, All Hail King Julien has attracted accomplished talent with A-level guest stars including Ellie Kemper (Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt), Angelica Huston (The Addams Family, The Royal Tenenbaums), Henry Winkler (Happy Days, Arrested Development), and John Michael Higgins (Pitch Perfect, Yes Man).

You might be familiar with the Emmy®-winning show, but did you know that All Hail King Julien isn’t just a tropical adventure for children? In fact, the show has become a mecca of pop culture phenomena and not-so-subtle adult humor, bringing the jungle of Madagascar closer to modern society than you might think. With skewering parallels to our addictive consumption of coffee and ridiculous “high fashion” trends, biting representations of class and beauty standards, and emotional characters that challenge stereotypical gender roles, All Hail King Julien produces witty observations that are meant for modern-day thinkers of all ages.

All Hail King Julien season 3 lands on Netflix on Friday, June 17th.

»

- Gary Collinson

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Ambient Noise: Exploring The Use Of Sound In Wes Anderson Films [Watch]

13 June 2016 2:25 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Wes Anderson is a filmmaker obsessed with using style to to conjure up hyperrealistic locales, be it the intricate dollhouse-like construction of the brownstone in “The Royal Tenenbaums,” the enchanting New England island of “Moonrise Kingdom,” the anthropomorphic storybook world of “Fantastic Mr. Fox,” or the fully-realized world of “The Grand Budapest Hotel.” With symmetrical […]

The post Ambient Noise: Exploring The Use Of Sound In Wes Anderson Films [Watch] appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Chris Evangelista

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8 powerfully effective voice-overs in modern movies

7 June 2016 6:31 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Sometimes funny, often poignant, narration can be hugely effective when deployed successfully. Ryan picks a few great examples...

“God help you if you use voice-over in your work my friends! God help you. That’s flaccid, sloppy writing. Any idiot can use narration to explain the thoughts of a character.”

So says screenwriting coach Robert McKee in Spike Jonze and Charlie Kaufman’s 2002 film, Adaptation. Well, not the real screenwriting coach Robert Mckee, but the one played in superbly aggressive style by actor Brian Cox, who stomps about on stage at a writing seminar like an angry bull. Brilliantly, McKee’s condemnation of voice-overs interrupts the interior thoughts, as narrated by Nicolas Cage’s fictionalised version of Charlie Kaufman - a terminally anxious screenwriter with an Everest-sized case of writer’s block.

It’s an example of the quirky, hall-of-mirrors kind of humour that courses through Adaptation, »

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Ocean’s Eleven is Back: A Celebration of the Franchise

8 March 2016 9:00 PM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

In recent years, Hollywood has come under increasing pressure to address what’s seen as a huge gender inequality issue within the movie industry. With an overwhelmingly positive response to Paul Feig’s upcoming all-female remake of Ghostbusters, and now the news of a possible Ocean’s Eleven reboot, this time with an all-star female cast, it’s looking like things may be about to change.

Rumours of the all-female sequel began to circulate last year, as reported by The Playlist. Since then there have been numerous reports of who will join the cast. Oscar winner Sandra Bullock is reportedly set to step into the lead role, made famous by George Clooney in the 2001 remake of the original film and its sequels.

Hunger Games director Gary Ross has been tipped to direct the remake, which has the backing of the last trilogy’s director Steven Soderbergh, who is also rumoured »

- admin

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Raleigh Ritchie: my family values

4 March 2016 4:59 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The actor and musician talks about being close to his mum, who was adopted, and how his love of music comes from his dad

My real name is Jacob Anderson, but my singer name is Raleigh Ritchie – a compound of the forenames of my two favourite characters from Wes Anderson’s The Royal Tenenbaums. When I told Dad I’d adopted a new name, I think he was slightly gutted because he’s proud of the family name.

My parents divorced when I was 18 months old. They haven’t always been the best of friends, but they were good at keeping that stuff away from me. Mum and I have always been close. Her adoptive parents died when she was 18 and she doesn’t have any other kids, so I’m her only family. She lives life to the full and I envy her vitality. She has pink hair and »

- Interview by Angela Wintle

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The Best and Worst of Ben Stiller, A to Z

13 February 2016 7:52 AM, PST | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Ben Stiller's professional onscreen career is officially turning 30 this year — that's roughly 412 in comedian years. In a business where funny people tend to quickly exhaust their limited charm and sink from telling jokes to becoming a punchline, the restless and versatile Stiller has managed to sustain one of the most consistent comic careers this side of Bob Hope. From his days as a bit player to his later emergence as a force of nature in front of the camera and behind the scenes (you have his production company Red »

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21 Possible Explanations as to Why The Ridiculous 6 Is Netflix's Most Streamed Movie

8 January 2016 9:40 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Netflix announced earlier this week that Adam Sandler's widely maligned Western "parody/comedy" (terms used in their loosest sense) The Ridiculous 6 - a film so lazily racist multiple Native Americans walked off the set while filming and so terrible that it has a zero percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes - is currently its most streamed film. This is … entirely unacceptable, and in a Herculean effort to wrap our brains around why, precisely, this must be, we've brainstormed a list of reasons that could possibly explain it. 1. People think it's Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight and are just »

- Alex Heigl, @alex_heigl

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21 Possible Explanations as to Why The Ridiculous 6 Is Netflix's Most Streamed Movie

8 January 2016 9:40 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Netflix announced earlier this week that Adam Sandler's widely maligned Western "parody/comedy" (terms used in their loosest sense) The Ridiculous 6 - a film so lazily racist multiple Native Americans walked off the set while filming and so terrible that it has a zero percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes - is currently its most streamed film. This is … entirely unacceptable, and in a Herculean effort to wrap our brains around why, precisely, this must be, we've brainstormed a list of reasons that could possibly explain it. 1. People think it's Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight and are just »

- Alex Heigl, @alex_heigl

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The WGA Names the 101 Funniest Screenplays of All Time

31 December 2015 5:13 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Let’s end the year with a celebration of the funniest comedy scripts ever written. The Writer’s Guild of America has chosen the 101 best laugh-getting screenplays. Keep in mind that this is all about the writing, not the cast or the director.

1.Annie Hall (1977)

2. Some Like it Hot (1959)

3. Groundhog Day (1993)

4. Airplane! (1980)

5. Tootsie (1982)

6. Young Frankenstein (1974)

7. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

8. Blazing Saddles (1974)

9. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)

10. National Lampoon’s Animal House (1978)

11. This is Spinal Tap (1984)

12. The Producers (1967)

13. The Big Lebowski (1998)

14. Ghostbusters (1984)

15. When Harry Met Sally (1989)

16. Bridesmaids (2011)

17. Duck Soup (1933)

18. There’s Something About Mary (1998)

19. The Jerk (1979)

20. A Fish Called Wanda (1988)

21. His Girl Friday (1940)

22. The Princess Bride (1987)

23. Raising Arizona (1987)

24. Bringing Up Baby (1938)

25. Caddyshack (1980)

26. Monty Python’s Life of Brian (1979)

27. The Graduate (1967)

28. The Apartment (1960)

29. Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (2006)

30. The Hangover (2009)

31. The 40-Year-Old Virgin (2005)

32. The Lady Eve »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

14 items from 2016


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