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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 53 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Matthew Marsden making directorial debut with I Am That Man

25 May 2017 8:00 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Matthew Marsden (Black Hawk Down, Rambo) is making his directorial debut with the gritty thriller I Am That Man, which has just started production in Los Angeles.

Struggling to come to terms with the break-up of his marriage and his reintegration into civilian life, former Navy Seal John Beckett contemplates returning to what he knows best, war. When a close friend is brutally murdered in a racially motivated attack, Beckett calls upon his specialized military skills to find the perpetrators and bring them to justice. Has he found a new sense of purpose, or will this be his last mission?

The film sees Marsden directing from his own script, as well as starring alongside Christine Lakin (Family Guy, Valentine’s Day), Jeremy Ratchford (Cold Case, Leatherheads), Stelio Savante (Blood In The Water, The Making Of The Mob) and Josh Kelly (Unreal, One Life To Live). »

- Gary Collinson

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‘The Silent Man’ First Clip: Liam Neeson Transforms Into ‘Deep Throat’ in Watergate Drama

25 May 2017 9:39 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Sony Pictures Classics has acquired the North American rights to “The Silent Man,” marking the occasion by releasing a first-look photo and teaser for the Watergate drama. The film is written and directed by Peter Landesman (“Concussion”) and stars Liam Neeson, Diane Lane and Kate Walsh.

Read More: How ‘Silence’ and ‘A Monster Calls’ Prove Liam Neeson Is Way More Than An Action Hero — Watch

The Silent Man” tells the true story of special agent Mark Felt (played by Neeson), the notorious secret informant who, in 1974, helped journalists Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein uncover the greatest political scandal in Us history. Felt was given the pseudonym of “Deep Throat” until he revealed himself as the famous tipster in 2005. The all-star cast also includes Marton Csokas (“The Equalizer”), Josh Lucas (“The Lincoln Lawyer”), Kate Walsh (“Private Practice”), Tony Goldwyn (“Scandal”), Michael C. Hall (“Dexter”), Tom Sizemore (“Black Hawk Down”), Wendi McLendon-Covey »

- Yoselin Acevedo

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Here’s Liam Neeson as Deep Throat in new clip from The Silent Man

25 May 2017 8:06 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Sony Pictures Classics have provided us with our very first look at Liam Neeson as Deep Throat, the infamous whistle blower in the first clip from the upcoming The Silent Man.

The film revovles around Mark Felt – aka Deep Throat, the pseudonym given to the notorious whistle blower for one of the greatest scandals of all time, Watergate. The true identity of the secret informant remained a mystery and source of much public curiosity and speculation for more than 30 years. That is until, in 2005, special agent Mark Felt shockingly revealed himself as the tipster. This unbelievable true story chronicles the personal and professional life of the brilliant and uncompromising Felt, who risked and ultimately sacrificed everything – his family, his career, his freedom – in the name of justice.

Also starring in the film are the likes of Diane Lane (Unfaithful), Marton Csokas (The Equalizer), Josh Lucas (The Lincoln Lawyer), Tony Goldwyn »

- Paul Heath

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Why Ridley Scott Needs to Stop Making Alien Movies

22 May 2017 9:27 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Upon first glance at the title it might seem like some "click-bait" article trying to get read. And perhaps, no matter what you read here, that is how you're going to see it. However, once you finish reading this opinion piece (and remember, this is simply my opinion), you may very well agree that Ridley Scott is no longer the man to handle the Alien franchise. Especially after watching this weekend's less than stellar Alien: Covenant.

When the first Alien movie landed in theaters in 1979, it was groundbreaking. It featured incredible special effects, a plausible look at the space program in the future, and a scene of such amazingly grotesque proportions (the alien exploding out of a crew mate's stomach), it still shocks people to this day. The film was smart, it featured a female kicking ass, and in many ways, the first Alien movie directed by Ridley Scott is still ahead of it's time. »

- MovieWeb

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Transformers: Bumblebee Spin-Off Logo Revealed

15 May 2017 10:01 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

A new trademark application from Hasbro has revealed the first official logo for the upcoming Bumblebee spin-off, which will continue the Transformers franchise in theaters next summer. The logo application was approved this weekend, and this is most likely just an early version of this logo, since there is no color scheme quite yet. This logo was described on the application as a "stylized design of a bee," which will be used for "toy action figures, toy vehicles and toy robots convertible into other visual toy form".

Tfw 2005 unveiled the logo over the weekend, although it isn't ultimately clear when we may see this logo in its official form quite yet. While no cast members have been announced, Travis Knight, who made his directorial debut with Kubo and the Two Strings last year, has signed on to direct this Bumblebee adventure, from a script by Christina Hodson (Gotham City Sirens). Michael Bay, »

- MovieWeb

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Ridley Scott and the storytelling problem

14 May 2017 2:14 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Simon Brew May 16, 2017

Alien: Covenant is the latest example of the very best, and not so great, things about Ridley Scott's directing...

There are very, very light spoilers for Prometheus and Alien: Covenant ahead.

I can’t think of too many more recent well-deserved sci-fi blockbuster hits than The Martian. I really like the film a lot. Expertly directed by one of cinema’s best ever world builders, Ridley Scott, it of course told the story of a man stranded on the red planet, with the simple task of staying alive for, er, a long time before help could be found. Given that the Mars movies we got in the early 2000s were Mission To Mars and Red Planet, I’m happy to call The Martian a substantial upgrade.

I’d also suggest it brought the best out of Ridley Scott.

Scott came to The Martian relatively late in the day. »

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New War Machine Trailer Exposes The Absurdity Of The War On Terror

12 May 2017 1:07 PM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

Movies about modern military conflicts, whether action, drama, or comedy are tough nuts to crack. For every epic war film like Black Hawk Down, American Sniper, or Zero Dark Thirty there are clunkers like Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, Jarhead, or The Delta Force. Part of the problem, speaking as an Army veteran, is that it's very hard to capture the nuances and idiosyncrasies of the military and how our troops interact on-duty/off-duty.

Each branch of the military is a culture unto itself, heavy with jargon, rivalries, and living conditions that are difficult to translate on-screen and generally opaque to the general public. Try explaining the mutual dislike between the Army and the Marines to someone who's never served, it's one of those "you'd have to be there" kind of things to explain.

Related - Netflix Pays $60 Million For Original Brad Pitt Flick ‘War Machine

Military comedies, are perhaps the most challenging sub-genre to get right. »

- David Kozlowski

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The Wall Review

6 May 2017 10:30 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Doug Liman’s The Wall faces the same problem as Netflix’s Sand Castle – is there anything left unsaid about an already mass-criticized Iraq invasion? We’ve heard it all. Government debriefings, conspiracy theories, oil-slick motivations. At this point – almost a decade after occupancy began to wind down – what more is there to exploit? Not much, which is why writer Dwain Worrell draws up this cat-and-mouse sniper battle like a modern-times Enemy At The Gates. One location, sun-soaked tension and a maniac shooter with his sights locked on American troopers. Imagine Jonás Cuarón’s Desierto, except instead of Jeffrey Dean Morgan hunting Mexican border crossers, a Middle Eastern man takes exception to the flag-waving “invaders” who just want to “help.”

Stop me if you’ve heard/seen/experienced these patriotic paradoxes before.

Aaron Taylor-Johnson stars as Sergeant Allen Isaac – “Eyes” for short – who’s 22 hours into a military stakeout with »

- Matt Donato

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Alien 5: Ridley Scott Says Sequel Is Dead

1 May 2017 9:43 PM, PDT | Film-Book | See recent Film-Book news »

Ridley Scott Announces That Alien 5 Will Not Be Happening After All Academy Award-nominated Black Hawk Down director Ridley Scott closes the door on the possibility of there being an Alien 5. With the release of Alien: Covenant around the corner, many are already anticipating what Scott has in store for the classic science fiction [...]

Continue reading: Alien 5: Ridley Scott Says Sequel Is Dead »

- Reggie Peralta

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Tribeca Film Review: ‘Dabka’

27 April 2017 7:13 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

In the 1980s, what the average North American knew of Somalia he learned from Sally Struthers-hosted feed-the-children commercials. Then came Ridley Scott’s “Black Hawk Down,” which portrayed white actors beset by ululating black guerrillas, and a series of news reports in which Western ships were hijacked by small bands of Somali “pirates.” Each and every one of these depictions simplifies a civilization that, according to writer-director Bryan Buckley’s “Dabka,” needs to be recognized “as the incredibly complex people that they are” — a budding democracy struggling to assert itself among rivals with the power to steal their resources right out from under them.

So, that’s what’s progressive and good about “Dabka.” Unfortunately, best intentions aside, the film itself is a rowdy, often abrasive account of how a lone Canadian journalist had the chutzpah to actually travel to Somalia and investigate a situation that others were to skittish to cover. »

- Peter Debruge

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Dabka Review [Tribeca 2017]

27 April 2017 5:15 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Dabka opens with a voiceover from its protagonist, Jay Bahadur (Evan Peters), explaining that he hates voiceover in films because it’s lazy filmmaking. This self-aware smugness unfortunately sets the tone for the entire movie, which wavers between comedy and serious drama without much clear direction or purpose. And it’s a shame, because the true story of Dabka, about an aspiring journalist who embedded himself with Somali pirates for six months, is about as exciting as you can get.

When we first meet Jay, he’s an obnoxious and entitled man-child, living in his parents’ basement in Toronto (not his fault), working marketing for a napkin manufacturer (also not his fault), and waxing eloquent about what a brilliant and misunderstood writer he is (very much his fault). He is, in other words, the worst that has ever been said about the Millennial generation, a fact which renders him unsympathetic to most viewers and, »

- Lauren Humphries-Brooks

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Michael Mann to Co-Write ‘Heat’ Prequel Novel With Reed Farrel Coleman

27 April 2017 9:36 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Michael Mann is feeling literary these days. Earlier this week it was announced that he and producer Michael De Luca had acquired the rights to Mark Bowden’s “Hue 1968,” and now Deadline is reporting that Mann is partnering with Reed Farrel Coleman to co-write the prequel novel to “Heat.”

Read More: Michael Mann to Adapt ‘Black Hawk Down’ Author’s ‘Hue 1968’ as a Miniseries

A poet and crime-fiction author, Coleman recently published “What You Break” and is up for an Edgar Award (his fourth nomination) for “Where It Hurts.” “Heat,” which stars Al Pacino and Robert De Niro as a cop and criminal, respectively, was released to great acclaim in 1995 and remains one of the most celebrated action flicks of all time. Val Kilmer, Jon Voight, Tom Sizemore, Amy Brenneman and Ashley Judd round out the ensemble cast.

Read More: Hugh Jackman and Noomi Rapace to Star in »

- Michael Nordine

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Michael Mann Will Produce and Direct Miniseries ‘Hue 1968’

25 April 2017 2:30 PM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Filmmaker Michael Mann is now working on an eight-to-10 hour long miniseries based on Mark Bowden‘s (Black Hawk Down) upcoming non-fiction novel, “Hue 1968: A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam,” due out this June. Bowden, who spent five years writing his new book, recounts the Tet Offensive. Michael De Luca (The Social Network) is producing […]

The post Michael Mann Will Produce and Direct Miniseries ‘Hue 1968’ appeared first on /Film. »

- Jack Giroux

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Hue 1968 Miniseries In The Works With Michael Mann Attached

25 April 2017 6:45 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Now here’s a piping hot package that’s beginning to coalesce at a brisk clip. According to Deadline, writer-director Michael Mann and Michael De Luca are joining forces for an eight-to-ten-hour miniseries based on Hue 1968: The Turning Point in the American War in Vietnam, the soon-to-be-published novel from scribe Mark Bowden.

If that name sounds familiar, it should; Bowden is also the creative mind behind wartime drama Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War – the same Black Hawk Down that Ridley Scott engineered into a taut, nail-biting thriller back in ’01. Set to release on June 6th, Hue 1968 takes place during the height of the Vietnam War, when napalm was the weapon of choice and Creedence Clearwater Revival blared out over the speakers.

Perhaps most intriguing of all, though, is the fact that Mark Bowden’s novel will present a no-holds-barred account of the Vietnam War, including »

- Michael Briers

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Michael Mann Plans Return to Television with Vietnam War Drama ‘Hue 1968’

24 April 2017 4:32 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With the respected directors making their way to television, the medium is now luring Michael Mann back into its warming embrace. The Heat director, who cut his teeth on TV shows like Starsky and Hutch, Police Story, and Miami Vice, has, along with producer Michael De Luca, snapped up the rights to Black Hawk Down author Mark Bowden’s Hue 1968: A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam.

Deadline reports that Mann and De Luca will shape Bowden’s book into an an eight-to ten-hour miniseries event, with Mann directing “numerous episodes.” Hue 1968 focuses on the Tet Offensive that became a major turning point of American involvement in the Vietnam War, and one can see the Amazon synopsis below.

By January 1968, despite an influx of half a million American troops, the fighting in Vietnam seemed to be at a stalemate. Yet General William Westmoreland, commander of American forces, »

- The Film Stage

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TV News Roundup: Eliza Dushku to Develop ‘The Black Company’ Books as TV Series

24 April 2017 3:32 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

In today’s roundup, Eliza Dushku is adapting a well-known book series for TV, IFC premiered for two new comedy series, and Norman Lear will host a new podcast. 

Development

Im Global Television, Eliza Dushku, and David S. Goyer will develop a television adaptation of “The Black Company” based on Glen Cook’s fantasy series. Dushku’s Boston Diva Productions optioned the ten-book fantasy series, with Dushku set to star as sorceress “The Lady.” The adaptation will include the forthcoming book “Port of Shadows,” which takes place between the first and second books in the series. The stories follow the Black Company, a mercenary unit that carries out nefarious deeds across a Tolkeinesque landscape, often at the behest of The Lady in order to maintain her power. When the men of the company discover that the embodiment of good has been reborn, they must re-examine their loyalties. David S. Goyer and Kevin Turen will executive produce, as »

- Erin Nyren

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Michael Mann, Michael De Luca line up 'Hue 1968' series

24 April 2017 12:25 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Vietnam War adaption will focus on lives on all sides during pivotal Tet Offensive.

Michael Mann and Michael De Luca have acquired rights to Mark Bowden’s upcoming book Hue 1968, which they will develop into an eight-to-10-hour miniseries.

Mann, the Oscar-winning director of Collateral, The Insider, and Heat, will direct multiple episodes and produce alongside De Luca, the Fifty Shades Darker producer who recently co-produced the Oscar telecast.

Hue 1968 took Bowden, the best-selling author of Black Hawk Down, five years to write and focuses on lives on all sides of the conflict during the pivotal Tet Offensive. Grove Atlantic will publish the book on June 6.

Characters include a seemingly innocent Vietnamese schoolgirl turned hardened revolutionary; a Marine captain from Pennsylvania who becomes a war hero; a Hanoi teacher who fights as an infantryman for the North Vietnamese army; and Us president Lyndon B. Johnson.

Mark Bowden’s written a masterpiece of intensely dramatic non-fiction,” Mann said. “Bowden »

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Michael Mann to Adapt ‘Black Hawk Down’ Author’s ‘Hue 1968’ as a Miniseries

24 April 2017 9:45 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Prepare for a Manniseries. Deadline reports that Michael Mann and Michael De Luca have purchased the rights to Mark Bowden’s forthcoming “Hue 1968: The Turning Point in the American War in Vietnam,” which they intend to adapt as an eight-to-10-hour miniseries.

Read More: Hugh Jackman and Noomi Rapace to Star in Michael Mann’s Ferrari Biopic

Mann has called “Hue 1968” “a masterpiece of intensely dramatic non-fiction” whose achievement “is in making ‘them’ into us.” Bowden is also the author of “Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War,” whose 2001 film adaptation was directed by Ridley Scott.

“We are them. There are no background people; people abstracted into statistics, body counts,” said Mann. “There is the sense that everybody is somebody, as each is in the reality of his or her own life. The brilliance of Bowden’s narrative, the achievement of interviewing hundreds of people on all »

- Michael Nordine

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Michael Mann to Adapt ‘Black Hawk Down’ Author’s ‘Hue 1968’ as a Miniseries

24 April 2017 9:45 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Prepare for a Manniseries. Deadline reports that Michael Mann and Michael De Luca have purchased the rights to Mark Bowden’s forthcoming “Hue 1968: The Turning Point in the American War in Vietnam,” which they intend to adapt as an eight-to-10-hour miniseries.

Read More: Hugh Jackman and Noomi Rapace to Star in Michael Mann’s Ferrari Biopic

Mann has called “Hue 1968” “a masterpiece of intensely dramatic non-fiction” whose achievement “is in making ‘them’ into us.” Bowden is also the author of “Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War,” whose 2001 film adaptation was directed by Ridley Scott.

“We are them. There are no background people; people abstracted into statistics, body counts,” said Mann. “There is the sense that everybody is somebody, as each is in the reality of his or her own life. The brilliance of Bowden’s narrative, the achievement of interviewing hundreds of people on all »

- Michael Nordine

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Michael Mann & Michael De Luca Set Miniseries On Mark Bowden Tet Offensive Book ‘Hue 1968’

24 April 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Exclusive: Michael Mann and Michael De Luca have acquired rights to Hue 1968, and they will shape as an event eight- to 10-hour miniseries Mark Bowden’s kaleidoscopic account of the Tet Offensive that became the turning point of American involvement in the Vietnam War. Bowden’s books have been catnip for Hollywood, and his Black Hawk Down was turned into the memorable Ridley Scott-directed 2001 thriller. Bowden worked five years on Hue 1968, which will be published June 6… »

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 53 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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