In the Peña household, language barriers arise, cultures clash... and hilarity ensues!

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4   3   2   1  
1980   1979   1978   1977   Unknown  

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Cast

Series cast summary:
Velia Martinez ...
 Abuela Adela 39 episodes, 1977-1980
Ana Margarita Martínez Casado ...
Luis G. Oquendo ...
 Abuelo Antonio 39 episodes, 1977-1980
Manolo Villaverde ...
Ana Margo ...
 Carmen Peña 39 episodes, 1977-1980
Connie Ramirez ...
Barbara Ann Martin ...
 Sharon Robinson 30 episodes, 1977-1980
...
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Storyline

Pepe Peña is a proud man who emigrated from his native Cuba in the early 1960s. With him came his young son Joe, his wife Juana, and her parents Adela and Antonio; daughter Carmen was born to the couple in their new home: Miami. Pepe has his hands full coping with his Americanized teenagers, newly independent-minded wife, and Spanish-only speaking in-laws. Adding Carmen's wacky girlfriends and lusty next-door neighbor Marta to the mix is almost too much for Pepe to bear! Written by Ken Oswald <@UncleGeorge@Cliffhanger.com>

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Genres:

Comedy

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Release Date:

1 May 1977 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

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(39 episodes)

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Trivia

The Department of Health, Education and Welfare required the dialogue to be 60% English and 40% Spanish. See more »

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User Reviews

What a show! If only more people knew about it!
20 January 2001 | by (Columbus, OH) – See all my reviews

I have to tell you that growing up in Miami when this show was new was kind of freaky as elements of character and certain episodes could have been plucked right out of my life or the life of those around me. Even being Puerto Rican (not Cuban), I felt such a kinship with the Peñas, I felt Cuban by osmosis. If it wasn't the drama of the kids' identity crisis of being American and Hispanic at the same time, it was the insane drama Papa Peña went through when they thought Joe might be gay mirrored my own coming out trauma. Still one of my favorite shows, holding its own alongside some all-time classics, despite its miniscule budget and supposedly limited appeal. I've turned on many a non-Spanish speaker onto the bilingual show and hope that more people outside of South Florida will learn about this show and it's surprisingly universal message.


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