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10 Strangest Foreign Objects In WWE History

WWE.com

World Wrestling Entertainment has seen its fair-share of foreign objects used in its 50 years of existence. There was a time when foreign objects were limited to objects found around ringside- folding chairs, the time keeper’s bell, ring steps. Foreign object brought to the ring by a manager- a manager’s cane, megaphone, or loaded purse- have always been in vogue, as have items smuggled into the ring in a wrestler’s tights- brass knuckles, a roll of quarters, a pencil- or boots. But with the popularity boom of the WWF’s Attitude Era in the late-90s to today, more and more outlandish weapons have been used to the entertainment (and sometimes embarrassment) of wrestling fans. While bodyslams through tables, Con-Chair-Tos, and leaps off of ladders still garner greater reactions, WWE Superstars seem bent on one-upping each other in terms of creativity and originality; some objects work,
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Review: ‘The Night of the Devils’ is Wonderfully Lurid Italian Horror Done Right

Editors’ Note: The Coroner’s Report and Foreign Objects are distinct columns covering horror and foreign films respectively, but a mash-up of the two feels more appropriate on the rare occasion when we cover a foreign language horror film. You wouldn’t know it from Italy’s film output these days, but there was a time when the country was home to filmmakers keeping the horror genre alive and well for the rest of us. That time was a roughly three decade span from the 60s through the 80s when filmmakers like Mario Bava, Dario Argento, Lucio Fulci and Lamberto Bava delivered movies that paired violence and sexuality with style and atmosphere. The result was a list of movies that continue to excite fans to this day including A Bay of Blood, Suspiria, The Beyond, Demons and more. Giorgio Ferroni and his 1972 film, La Notte dei Diavoli (aka The Night of the Devils) aren’t nearly as
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‘Elena’ Teases Twists But Chooses Character Study Instead (Russia)

The goal of this column has always been to explore international cinema from all around the globe. To that end I’ve been an inconsistent tour guide as our destinations haven’t been as evenly spread about as they could have been. My own preferences lean towards traditional Asian, Western European and South American cinema which means Foreign Objects explores places like Africa, Eastern Europe or India very rarely. Russia is a huge country with a long-standing film community, but in our 131 installments we’ve only visited there twice… first for the abysmal Philosophy of a Knife and then for the mediocre Alien Girl. Which probably explains why it took so damn long for me to return… Elena is a fifty-something house wife to a well-off retiree named Vladimir. Together just two years, their relationship is more an extension of how they met than a true marriage. She was a nurse, he
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‘The Cat o Nine Tails’ May Be Dario Argento’s Most Generically Competent Thriller (Italy)

Last week’s installment of Foreign Objects took a look at the third film in Dario Argento’s so-called “animal trilogy,” Four Flies on Grey Velvet. Why start with the third film and not the first? No reason. But today we’re continuing with the theme and covering the second film, The Cat o’ Nine Tails. Don’t worry about continuity though as the three movies are in no way related. A burglary at a local genetics institute catches the eye ear of a blind retiree, and when people associated with the incident start dropping dead he teams up with a reporter to try to crack the case. The duo discovers an elaborate chain of events surrounding the lab’s recent discovery of a genetic marker that may indicate criminal tendencies and a drug that may cure it. Is someone killing to protect the discovery… or are they killing to hide the fact that they’re a
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Coroner’s Report: Dream Home (2010)

Genre buddy and fellow root canal survivor Rob Hunter came to my aid this week when it was time for title selection. I was stupidly about to put in The Wild Hunt, which has something to do with LARPing and virgins or something, when the Foreign Objects author suggested I try something a little more sub-titled. Dream Home is the story about the American dream taking place in Hong Kong. Young Cheng Lai-sheung (Josie Ho) is a phone representative for a bank in Hong Kong and all she wants out of life is a nice flat with a view of the ocean for her ailing grandfather to live in. She’ll stop at nothing to get that home, from scraping together every penny and working two extra jobs. After raising enough capital to buy into the flat, the sellers decide to ask for more money and Cheng reacts completely reasonably. For
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Foreign Objects: ‘Meet the Feebles’ Reveals the Hidden Lives of Some Very Muppet-Like Performers (New Zealand)

In honor of The Muppets and our ongoing Muppet coverage this week’s Foreign Objects is sticking with the puppet theme in our own special way. But the Muppets are an American sensation, so while they’ve traveled the world they’ve always done so in American movies. Non-Muppet puppet movies are few and far between, and most of them are still Us productions (Team America: World Police, Puppet Master, Let My Puppets Come) with only a handful of foreign titles like Legend of the Sacred Stone and Kooky. But I couldn’t find either of those. So we’ll be taking a look at Peter Jackson’s 1989 release from New Zealand, Meet the Feebles. It’s like The Muppets, but with more sex, drugs, murder and sticky white fluids… Today’s Peter Jackson is a far cry from the Peter Jackson of twenty years ago. Now he makes movies with immense budgets, casts
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Year in Review: Our 15 Best Editorials of 2010

We here at Fsr pride ourselves on speaking with authority. It doesn’t always happen (especially when I’m writing about Inception after drinking three boxes of wine), but it’s the goal we strive for. We’re bursting on the brink of boastfulness to provide a service most other film sites don’t offer – the ingenuity and odd creativity of our team of writers. Our readership is up 46% this year and that’s thanks in a major way to our fans, to the fourth box of wine, and to these features and editorials. If you missed them the first time, enjoy adding your two cents. If you’re catching them for the second time around, feel free to flame on for old time’s sake. (Click on any of the titles below to read the full articles.) 15. The Movie World Cup By: Cole Abaius and Rob Hunter (and readers) Where else can you see The Dark Knight vs
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Foreign Objects: The Maid (Chile)

Foreign Objects travels the world of international cinema each week looking for films worth visiting. So renew your passport, get your shots, and brush up on the local age of legal consent… this week we’re spending some time with the South American working class. Racquel (Catalina Saavedra) works as a live-in maid for a well to do family, and her duties run the gamut of cooking, cleaning, and child care. She’s introduced hiding in the kitchen as the family tries in vain to cajole her into the dining room to celebrate her own 41st birthday. She’s been a maid to this same family for twenty three years, she’s suffering from migraines and fainting spells, she’s been butting heads with the oldest daughter, and her face is stuck in a permanent grimace. Racquel is one tired and frustrated Chilean. Sympathetic to Racquel’s condition and concerned with her increasing attitude, Pilar
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Foreign Objects: Legend Of the Black Scorpion (China)

Foreign Objects travels the world of international cinema each week looking for films worth visiting. So renew your passport, get your shots, and brush up on the local age of legal consent… this week we’ve got a dinner date with Shakespeare. By way of China. Ang Lee’s phenomenal Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon kicked off a decade of similarly beautiful wuxia epics with films like House Of Flying Daggers, Hero, The Promise, and Curse Of the Golden Flower. Lee’s film remains the best of the bunch by far, but one that comes close to equaling it in visual and aural beauty is The Banquet. It lacks the overwhelming emotion and heartbreaking romance of Lee’s Academy Award winning film, but it does have glorious imagery and cinematography, the always exquisite Zhang Ziyi, and a fine literary pedigree in a story based loosely on William Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Oh, it
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Foreign Objects: Red Riding 1980 (2009)

Foreign Objects travels the world of international cinema each week to look for films worth visiting. So renew your passport, get your shots, and brush up on the local age of legal consent, this week we’re heading to… the UK! Note: Red Riding is a trilogy of films from the UK about a series of serial killings that terrorized Northern England from the late sixties on into the eighties. The movies are based on a quartet of books by David Peace and use the murders as a narrative thread that winds its way through the lives of people touched by the crimes including most notably the police and the press. Like Bong Joon-ho's Memories of Murder and David Fincher's Zodiac, Red Riding is just as (if not more) interested in the dark machinations of the men surrounding the case as it is the mystery itself. Of particular note is the trilogy's format... all
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Foreign Objects: Red Riding 1974 (2009)

Foreign Objects travels the world of international cinema each week to look for films worth visiting. So renew your passport, get your shots, and brush up on the local age of legal consent, this week we’re heading to… the UK! Note: Red Riding is a trilogy of films from the UK about a series of serial killings that terrorized Northern England from the late sixties on into the eighties. The movies are based on a quartet of books by David Peace and use the murders as a narrative thread that winds its way through the lives of people touched by the crimes including most notably the police and the press. Like Bong Joon-ho's Memories of Murder and David Fincher's Zodiac, Red Riding is just as (if not more) interested in the dark machinations of the men surrounding the case as it is the mystery itself. Of particular note is the trilogy's format... all
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

The 20 Best Foreign Language Films of the Decade

As part of our epic, two week long Decade in Review, master of the Foreign Objects Rob Hunter lays down his picks of the best foreign language films of the decade. I can reel off the best foreign films of the year without pause and feel fairly confident that I haven't missed anything notable, but best of the decade? Adding to the difficulty is the fact that of the thousands of films released each year in other countries very few of them actually ever reach our shores in any official capacity. Then there's the issue of release dates... do I use the year the film was first released or the year it finally reached the Us? There's way too much gray area here, so we're going to simplify things a bit. This is my list of the best foreign language films of the past ten years, and I highlight that ownership because I don't expect it to
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Foreign Objects: Red Cliff (Chi bi 2008)

Foreign Objects travels the world of international cinema each week to look for films worth visiting. So renew your passport, get your shots, and brush up on the local age of legal consent, this week we’re heading to… China! It's a full fifty-nine minutes into John Woo's new film, Red Cliff, before the first white dove appears. I don't mention that to be cheeky (well maybe a little cheeky), but instead I'm bringing it up because it shows a certain amount of restraint on the part of the dove-loving director. It's one of the very few instances where Woo's film seems to take it's sweet time, and while that sounds like a criticism it actually isn't for a couple reasons. One, the version of Red Cliff currently playing in limited Us release is actually a truncated two and a half hour cut of two complete films (that were themselves over two hours each). And two
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Foreign Objects: The Beast Stalker (Ching yan)

Foreign Objects travels the world of international cinema each week to look for films worth visiting. So renew your passport, get your shots, and brush up on the local age of legal consent, this week we’re heading to… Hong Kong! There are two quick issues we need to acknowledge and dispense with before we can proceed with this review of Dante Lam's recent action flick, The Beast Stalker. First, that is a terrible goddamn title. I know Lam made his name with a cool little movie called Beast Cops, but in addition to there being no relation between the two films it's just a poor title for an action movie without beasts in it. Yes yes, I know the term can be used metaphorically, but it implies a villain far more evil and bloodthirsty than the one we have here. Second, there's a whopper of a plot point you'll just have to accept if you're
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Foreign Objects: The Baader Meinhof Complex

Foreign Objects travels the world of international cinema each week to look for films worth visiting. So renew your passport, get your shots, and brush up on the local age of legal consent, this week we’re heading to… Germany! This may come as a shock to some of you, but I don't know everything. The range of what I don't know is actually fairly impressive in it's own right and includes (but is not limited to) the solution to the Hodge conjecture, what another word for 'synonym' is, the justification behind pea soup, the location of the Holy Grail, and much, much more. My ignorance is most notable (and most shameful) though when it comes to historical events. I blame the Catholics and their close-minded school system, but many Americans are in the same boat when it comes to being unaware of even recent historical events outside of our borders. For
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Foreign Objects: Hansel & Gretel

Foreign Objects travels the world of international cinema each week to look for films worth visiting. So renew your passport, get your shots, and brush up on the local age of legal consent, this week we’re heading to… South Korea! Asian horror films are known for a single iconic image... the long, black hair of a creepy, ghostly, Asian girl pissed off for some reason or other and out for revenge. It's no exaggeration to say that over 95% of the horror films from Japan, Korea, and Thailand play on some variation of that theme. (That may in fact be an exaggeration.) But once in a while a film gets released where the terrors and mysteries stem from someplace other than spectral vengeance. Take Hansel & Gretel for example... a dark, Korean re-imagining of a classic fairy tale (that still manages to include one shot of long, creepy, black hair pouring down from a trapdoor). Eun-soo has a
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Foreign Objects: Shinjuku Incident

Foreign Objects travels the world of international cinema each week to look for films worth visiting. So renew your passport, get your shots, and brush up on the local age of legal consent, this week we’re heading to… Hong Kong! Living in the United States it's easy to forget that we're not the only country to offer a better alternative to the lives people are born into. The Us/Mexican border is a revolving door where thousands of "tourists" come through on a daily basis. Some come for the fatty fast food, some for the even fattier basic cable, but most are here for the opportunity to take part in the American dream. Japan faced a similar situation in the 1990's (although they probably called it the Japanese dream) with a steady stream of illegals pouring in from throughout Asia (China, Vietnam, Taiwan, etc). It's not a topic that has seen much exposure on the silver
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Foreign Objects: Taxidermia

Foreign Objects travels the world of international cinema each week to look for films worth visiting. So renew your passport, get your shots, and brush up on the local age of legal consent, this week we’re heading to… Hungary! If Terry Gilliam woke up one day in Eastern Europe, horny, hungry, and obsessed with death... only to find the half-consumed bodies of David Cronenberg and Jean-Pierre Jeunet sprawled across his floor, morsels of both men's brains still stuck in his teeth... Taxidermia is the ninety-minute exploration of life, beauty, immortality, and bodily fluids he might rush to film before being arrested by the authorities. What does that mean exactly? I have no fucking clue. Taxidermia follows three generations of males in one very messed up Hungarian family. Vendel is a hare-lipped and sex-starved soldier in World War II who lives and works on his Lieutenant's farm. He's treated like crap by his superior, and
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Foreign Objects: Cold Prey 2

Foreign Objects travels the world of international cinema each week to look for films worth visiting. So renew your passport, get your shots, and brush up on the local age of legal consent, this week we’re heading to… Norway! When I reviewed Cold Prey at the beginning of the year (here) I was surprised to find it was such an entertaining, suspenseful, and well made slasher film. The most impressive thing about it of course was the fact that the movie is Norwegian. Who knew? It was more than a little redundant of the genre, but still managed to stand on it's own as a pretty cool little horror film. It was also a huge hit across Europe meaning a sequel was guaranteed... but could it possibly be any good? Cold Prey 2 picks up almost immediately after the first film's conclusion. Jannicke (Ingrid Bolso Berdal), the sole survivor of the Nordic killer's snowbound onslaught, is
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Foreign Objects: Thirst

Foreign Objects travels the world of international cinema each week to look for films worth visiting. So renew your passport, get your shots, and brush up on the local age of legal consent, this week we’re heading to… South Korea! Those of you who read this review column on a regular basis (Hi mom!) may have noticed a slight gap in it's weekly schedule... basically it's been absent for the past few weeks. I'd like to say it's due simply to me being on a month-long vacation or maybe that it's Cole Abaius' fault somehow, but unfortunately the truth is much more disturbing. Internationally acclaimed director Park Chan-wook had me kidnapped, held captive for a month, and then released earlier this week with a five-day deadline to figure out why. Unbelievable I know, but true... no? Ok damnit. I'm a slacker. I did meet Park over the last month though, and
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