IMDb > Session 9 (2001)
Session 9
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Session 9 (2001) More at IMDbPro »

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Session 9 -- Tensions rise within an asbestos cleaning crew as they work in an abandoned mental hospital with a horrific past that seems to be coming back.

Overview

User Rating:
6.6/10   38,275 votes »
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Down 12% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers (WGA):
Brad Anderson (written by) &
Stephen Gevedon (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for Session 9 on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
14 September 2001 (Italy) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Fear Is A Place.
Plot:
Tensions rise within an asbestos cleaning crew as they work in an abandoned mental hospital with a horrific past that seems to be coming back. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
2 wins & 1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
A True Psychological Thriller See more (465 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

David Caruso ... Phil

Stephen Gevedon ... Mike

Paul Guilfoyle ... Bill Griggs

Josh Lucas ... Hank

Peter Mullan ... Gordon Fleming

Brendan Sexton III ... Jeff
Charley Broderick ... Security Guard (as Charles Broderick)
Lonnie Farmer ... Doctor (voice)

Larry Fessenden ... Craig McManus
Jurian Hughes ... Mary Hobbes (voice)
Sheila Stasack ... Wendy (voice)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Sean Daly ... Vision (uncredited)

Directed by
Brad Anderson 
 
Writing credits
(WGA)
Brad Anderson (written by) &
Stephen Gevedon (written by)

Produced by
Dorothy Aufiero .... producer
David Collins .... producer
Mark Donadio .... line producer
John Sloss .... executive producer
Michael Williams .... producer
 
Original Music by
Climax Golden Twins 
 
Cinematography by
Uta Briesewitz 
 
Film Editing by
Brad Anderson 
 
Casting by
Sheila Jaffe 
Georgianne Walken 
 
Production Design by
Sophie Carlhian 
 
Art Direction by
Roger Danchik 
 
Costume Design by
Aimee McCue 
 
Makeup Department
Elizabeth Cecchini .... hair stylist
Jerry DeCarlo .... hair stylist
Tricia Heine .... makeup artist (as Patricia A. Heine)
Todd Kleitsch .... key makeup artist
Joe Rossi .... second makeup artist
 
Production Management
Heidi August .... production supervisor
David Collins .... unit production manager
Sarah Greenwald .... set production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Jennifer Blum .... first assistant director
Stephanie Finigan .... second second assistant director
Sarah Fraunfelder .... additional second assistant director
Dave Metzler .... second assistant director
 
Art Department
Joseph Barillaro .... lead scenic artist
Juliet Carter .... props buyer
Manya Cetlin .... art department coordinator
Russ Fischer .... assistant property master
Julia Garrison .... painter
Jay Heyman .... property master
James Hurd .... carpenter
Jonathan Keay .... on-set dresser
Christian Tyler King .... painter
Jenny E. McCracken .... scenic artist (as Jenny McCracken)
Vanessa Mills .... scenic artist
Conrad Mulcahy .... lead man
Nerys Powell .... greensman
Theodore Suchecki .... construction coordinator
Wendy Ward .... art department production assistant
David White .... storyboard artist
 
Sound Department
David Baldwin .... technical support
Javier Bennassar .... sound effects editor
Susan Cahill .... assistant sound editor
Gino Conway .... technical support
Matt Dubin .... digital transfer engineer
Lisle Engle .... sound designer (as Lisle Houston Engle)
Alan Freedman .... adr mixer
Jason George .... supervising sound editor
Robert Getty .... adr editor
Robert Getty .... dialogue editor
Michael Hertlein .... dialogue editor
Chato Hill .... assistant sound editor
Eric Jaffe .... technical support (as Eriq P. Jaffe)
Craig Jurkiewicz .... foley editor
Carrie Lisonbee .... sound effects editor (as Carrie Tippets)
Derek Marcil .... sound re-recording mixer
Diane Marshall .... foley artist (as S. Diane Marshall)
Michael Mullane .... sound effects editor
Vince Perry .... digital transfer engineer
Joel Reidy .... boom operator
William Smith .... sound re-recording mixer (as Bill Smith)
Alec St. John .... assistant sound editor
Lucy Sustar .... foley mixer
Jerry Trent .... foley artist
Johanna Turner .... sound effects editor
Tom Williams .... sound mixer
James Wright .... stereo sound consultant: Dolby (as James E. Wright)
Erika Wunch .... sound mixing advisor
 
Visual Effects by
Peter Kuran .... visual effects supervisor
Jo Martin .... visual effects editorial
Marilyn Nave .... visual effects coordinator
Kurt Wiley .... visual effects compositor
Jacqueline Zietlow .... administration: VCE
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Karine Albano .... best boy electric
John Althoff .... dolly grip
Woody Bell .... key grip
Jason Bowen .... rigging best boy grip
Evans Brown .... gaffer
Jan Burgess .... additional second assistant camera (as Janice Burgess)
Dave Cambria .... rigging gaffer (as David Cambria)
Lon Caracappa .... rigging gaffer
Rick Cardillo .... rigging electrician
Joseph Christofori .... first assistant camera
Robert Clark .... grip
Robert J. Clark .... grip
Erica Colegrove .... additional second assistant camera
Bob Coleman .... electrician
Rachelle Fankhauser .... electrician
William L. Flanagan .... rigging key grip (as Bill Flanagan)
Claire Folger .... still photographer
Mike Hadley .... electrician
Colin Hudson .... Steadicam operator
Colin Hudson .... camera operator
Dan Hutchinson .... electrician
Brian R. Johnson .... rigging electric
John R. Loyd .... grip (as Ric Loyd)
John R. Loyd .... grip
Tommy Maddox-Upshaw .... grip (as Tommy Upshaw)
Chris Nickerson .... electrician
Anthony Norton .... best boy grip
Charles Papert .... Steadicam operator
Michael Peterson .... electrician
Brian A. Pitts .... lighting board operator
Michael E. Reynolds .... generator operator
Daryl Richardson .... rigging best boy grip
Timothy M. Sweeney .... second assistant camera: "a" camera
 
Casting Department
Nancy Doyle .... local casting
Katharina Eggmann .... casting associate
Maura Tighe .... local casting
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Dana Schaefer .... costume assistant
Jillian Hancock .... wardrobe assistant (uncredited)
Kate Quinlan .... wardrobe assistant (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Steven Hathaway .... assistant editor
Ian B. Wile .... assistant editor
 
Music Department
Doug Bernheim .... music consultant
Barry Cole .... music supervisor
Christopher Covert .... music supervisor
Carson Daly .... executive music producer
Jeremy Raub .... music editor
 
Transportation Department
Robert Martini .... transportation captain
 
Other crew
Sean Baker .... assistant location manager
Aaron Benoy .... location consultant
Stephanie Carter .... production assistant
Karen Corsica .... production coordinator
Kelly Cronin .... script supervisor
Sean Daly .... assistant: Mr. Anderson
Nick DeMatteo .... safety consultant
Jim Donnelly .... location assistant: additional filming
Missy Eustermann .... post-production accountant
Erika Ewers .... assistant to producers
Christopher Fadale .... technical advisor
Zaida Fakih-Kuss .... production assistant
Jay Floyd .... clearance administrator
Sarah Greenwald .... production assistant
Wendy Harrold .... assistant production coordinator
Ian Kennedy .... production assistant
Stephen L'Heureux .... production financing
Jennifer Malone .... unit publicist
Scott Masterson .... key set production assistant
Michael Moran .... production assistant
Jonas Navickas .... production assistant
Ann Pankonin .... craft service (as Anne Pankonin)
Luke Poling .... production assistant
Thomas Powell .... production assistant
Brian Robel .... unit coordinator
Janice Sisti .... production accountant (as Janice G. Sisti)
Eric Wagner .... location production assistant
Matt Wall .... production executive
Tod Whipple .... location manager
Jami Burke .... production assistant (uncredited)
Deirdre Cavanaugh .... production assistant (uncredited)
Cat Hartwell .... production assistant (uncredited)
Brad Kelly .... production assistant (uncredited)
Marc Landers .... production assistant (uncredited)
J.M. Silverman .... production assistant (uncredited)
Hebron Simckes-Joffe .... production assistant (uncredited)
Anita Treon .... production assistant (uncredited)
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsSpecial EffectsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
MPAA:
Rated R for language and brief strong violence
Runtime:
100 min | Spain:102 min | USA:97 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Company:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Behind the tunnel with the rubber gloves, the cast and crew signed the wall. Brad Anderson wrote: "We did ASBESTOS we could!"See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: Peter Mullan kept forgetting to limp during his scenes resulting in many continuity errors. These are noted in the director's commentary as well.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Phil:Gordy? You look tired, man. You look beat. Your turn to feed Emma?
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Silent Hill 3 (2003) (VG)See more »

FAQ

Where was this movie filmed? I'd like to go and explore.
I don't understand the entire "Hank went to casino school in Miami" subplot. How could Hank talk on the phone if he was hurt or dead? Was Hank lying? Were Amy or Phil covering something up?
Who is the voice of Simon?
See more »
71 out of 122 people found the following review useful.
A True Psychological Thriller, 6 January 2004
Author: Dorian Tenore-Bartilucci (dtb) from Whitehall, PA

My husband and I had been excited about seeing SESSION 9 ever since we'd heard positive things about it from friends. Well, this chiller lived up to their praise and then some! By the time SESSION 9 ended, I felt like someone had been holding a knife to my throat for 100 minutes. I've never seen director/co-writer Brad Anderson's romantic comedy NEXT STOP WONDERLAND, but after sitting riveted and cowering in my seat throughout SESSION 9, I had a hard time imagining Anderson tackling anything even remotely lighthearted! Even when SESSION 9's blue-collar heroes exchange wisecracks, there's nothing jokey about the film; this isn't your ironic, self-mocking, postmodern kind of horror flick a la SCREAM. Speaking of lightheartedness, I knew Vin was as profoundly affected by SESSION 9 as I was because he never once leaned over and made any quips to me about anything happening onscreen, a rarity for my hubby! :-) Basically, there are two kinds of horror films: 1) the rollercoaster thrill ride kind, usually with cool F/X and inventive violence, which manage to be both scary and exhilarating at the same time (such as JAWS or SCREAM) and 2) the moody psychological thriller, usually character-driven rather than F/X driven (think HENRY: PORTRAIT OF A SERIAL KILLER or THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT). (Interestingly, the original 1963 version of THE HAUNTING fit in the #2 category and the 1999 version fit more in the #1 category; but I digress...) In the more emotional, realistic horror films, you might say the terror comes from, to borrow a phrase from FORBIDDEN PLANET, "monsters from the id." FP rendered its monsters from the id in animation form, but SESSION 9 doesn't need to. There's a sense of dread from the very first frame, with an askew camera angle on what seems to be an electric chair in an otherwise empty, long-neglected room. The sharp, sudden sound effects (passing cars sound like jets in this movie!) and eerie, backwards-sounding music by Climax Golden Twins (not at all what I'd have expected from Executive Music Producer Carson Daly of MTV fame) creeped me out, too. Having said all that, SESSION 9 isn't really a film about imagery, special effects, or gore. (In fact, there isn't much gore at all until the end, and even then it's plausible, real-world kind of gore, not some kind of Grand Guignol over-the-top bloodletting.) It's a truly intense, compelling nightmare about decent people and how, under pressure, their flaws and vulnerabilities and moments of bad judgment may lead to horror and tragedy for themselves and everyone in their orbit. I want to talk on and on about this film, and yet I don't want to, because I'm afraid of spoiling the shocks and suspense for you. I will tell you, however, that the protagonists are members of a hazardous materials removal team embarking on a job at the massive, imposing, long-abandoned Danvers State Mental Hospital (a real place in Massachusetts, BTW. So no, the Danvers name is not a tip of the hat to REBECCA! :-). This bat-shaped behemoth of a building is so remarkable that it feels like a character in its own right. But even before the men set foot in Danvers, the stage is set for tension and trouble. Desperate to get the Danvers job, boss man Gordon (Peter Mullan), a recent Scottish émigré to the U.S. and new father of a sickly, fussy baby, bids low and promises that he and his team can finish the job in one week. Crew chief Phil (David Caruso) is unhappy because he thinks 2 or 3 weeks would be more realistic, plus he doesn't think much of crew member Hank (Josh Lucas), the weaselly troublemaker who stole Phil's girl. Then there's Gordon's wet-behind-the-ears, dark-fearing teenage nephew Jeff (Brendan Sexton III); in one scene, he's trapped in a hallway where each light goes out in rapid succession, making it look like the darkness is chasing the poor kid. Finally, there's on-again, off-again law student Mike (co-writer Stephen Gevedon, who for some reason reminded me of a younger, handsomer, more rugged Jeremy Piven), whose lawyer dad was involved in a case that contributed to Danvers being shut down. Once inside the grim old complex, surrounded by peeling paint, water stains, graffiti, creepy old equipment, and the various patients' memorabilia from the old days, Hank finds a veritable treasure trove in the morgue's incinerator, Mike finds compelling audio tapes of a multiple-personality patient's sessions, and the place's overall eeriness begins to work everybody's nerves. But is it that the building is in some way haunted, or are the guys really being haunted by their own demons? That's the fiendish beauty of SESSION 9: just when you think you've got it pegged as a haunted-asylum thriller or a revenge thriller or a cross between THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT and TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE or whatever, it confounds your expectations. Soon you're too wrapped up in the mounting madness and suspense to sit there second-guessing. Every member of the superb cast gets you rooting for them and sympathizing with their characters (even Lucas as Hank is engaging in his own sneaky, self-absorbed way), so their unraveling has real emotional heft (unlike, say, the snarky, cocky trio in THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT. I must admit I took a sadistic glee in watching those self-important little jerks degenerating into terrified, jibbering wrecks, whereas my heart went out to SESSION 9's protagonists). As budget-conscious parents of a young child, Vinnie and I could especially identify with Gordon; the writing and Mullan's poignant portrayal of a strong man slowly being overwhelmed by circumstances perfectly brought out the pressures of new parenthood and providing for a family. After the film was over, Vinnie likened it to HENRY: PORTRAIT OF A SERIAL KILLER, not only in its true-to-life feel and its raw intensity, but in that it shakes you up so profoundly that you can't bear to watch it more than once. If you're into psychological horror, you owe it to yourself to see SESSION 9 at least once. It's one of the most powerful, disturbing films I've ever seen, and definitely one of 2001's best and most unfairly underseen movies.

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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Session 9 (2001)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
blu ray special features ( that id have on it) iiiccceee69
How can anyone really 'like' this movie? regexfan
The photos on the wall BePatient
I don't see how anyone can think Simon was supernatural luke-miller42
Question....and pls don't slam me.....some things went over my head. ikerocrub
Gordon is an insane patient in the mental institution ... the_headspace
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