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The Man Who Came to Dinner (2000)

Broadcast of a live performance of the Roundabout Theater Company's 2000 New York revival of the classic Kaufman-Hart comedy, about a famous (and famously acid-tongued) theater critic who ... See full summary »

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(play), (play) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Maggie Cutler (as Harriet Harris)
Lewis J. Stadlen ...
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Linda Stephens ...
Terry Beaver ...
William Duell ...
Mary Catherine Wright ...
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Ruby Holbrook ...
Julie Boyd ...
Jeff Hayenga ...
John (as Jeffrey Hayenga)
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Storyline

Broadcast of a live performance of the Roundabout Theater Company's 2000 New York revival of the classic Kaufman-Hart comedy, about a famous (and famously acid-tongued) theater critic who is forced to stay in a Midwestern couple's home and the havoc that ensues. Written by Tommy Peter

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Genres:

Comedy | Drama

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Details

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Release Date:

7 October 2000 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The part of Banjo was based on Alexander Woollcott's good friend, Harpo Marx. Harpo thought so much of Woollcott that he named two of his children after him. See more »

Quotes

Sheridan Whiteside: I may vomit.
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Connections

Version of The Man Who Came to Dinner (1942) See more »

Soundtracks

What Am I To Do
(uncredited)
Written by Cole Porter
Performed by Byron Jennings
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User Reviews

Live from Broadway
8 October 2000 | by (Eatontown, NJ, USA) – See all my reviews

PBS is to be commended for its "Stage on Screen" series premiere with this live broadcast from the newly restored 42nd Street theater district in New York City. While Nathan Lane has less of the imperious acidic bite that Monty Woolley brought to the 1942 film, Lane and the play still have punch and sparkle.

Of necessity, the live stage performance lacks the brisk pace of the movie simply because of the stops for scene changes or intermissions between acts. In addition, the classic film was pared down for length. In this broadcast, the interruptions were at least filled with chatty information about the play, the people represented in the play, and the resurrection of 42nd Street.

Despite or because of its dated allusions and overt references, the play is a delightful slice of real life in America just prior to World War II. The work stands up well and is likely to be a classic of 20th Century American theater.


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