IMDb > Seance (2000) (TV)

Seance (2000) (TV) More at IMDbPro »Kôrei (original title)

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Overview

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Director:
Writers:
Mark McShane (novel)
Tetsuya Onishi (teleplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Seance on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
12 May 2001 (Japan) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
A psychic housewife and her husband become burdened with a kidnapped girl who escaped her assailant... See more » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
2 wins & 1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
Retribution from above See more (18 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Kôji Yakusho ... Sato
Jun Fubuki ... Junko Sato
Tsuyoshi Kusanagi ... Hayasaka
Hikari Ishida ... Junko's customer
Kitarô ... Detective
Ittoku Kishibe ... College professor
Ren Ôsugi ... Restaurant customer
Shô Aikawa ... Shinto priest
Daikei Shimizu ... Tazaki, sound engineer
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Kazuya Horiguchi
Hajime Inoue
Shiuri Isobe
Michisuke Kashiwaya
Koji Sato
Masahiro Toda
Megumi Wakabayashi
Ryûji Yamamoto

Directed by
Kiyoshi Kurosawa 
 
Writing credits
Mark McShane (novel "Séance on a Wet Afternoon")

Tetsuya Onishi (teleplay) &
Kiyoshi Kurosawa (teleplay)

Produced by
Atsuyuki Shimoda .... producer
Takehiko Tanaka .... producer
Yasuyuki Uemura .... producer
 
Original Music by
Gary Ashiya 
 
Cinematography by
Takahide Shibanushi 
 
Film Editing by
Jun'ichi Kikuchi 
 
Production Design by
Satoru Jinno 
Tomoyuki Maruo 
 
Production Management
Emiko Fujiwara .... executive in charge of production
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Yasutaka Môri .... assistant director
Fumio Nomoto .... assistant director
Naoki Yoshida .... assistant director
Tatsuya Yoshimura .... first assistant director
 
Art Department
Gen Itô .... assistant art director
 
Sound Department
Yukio Hokari .... sound
Makio Ika .... sound
Akira Inoue .... sound recordist
Kazuhiro Kurihara .... sound recordist
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Masayuki Fujii .... assistant photographer
Masao Kanazawa .... gaffer
Akira Okugawa .... still photographer
Hidehito Ono .... assistant camera
Muneyoshi Sakagami .... assistant photographer
Yasuyuki Sakairi .... assistant camera
Masatoshi Watanabe .... assistant camera
 
Other crew
Yukari Yaginuma .... script supervisor
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Kôrei" - Japan (original title)
"Seance (Ko-Rei)" - Canada (English title)
See more »
Runtime:
118 min | Switzerland:95 min | Argentina:98 min (Buenos Aires Festival Internacional de Cine Independiente)
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:

Did You Know?

Movie Connections:
Version of Seance on a Wet Afternoon (1964)See more »

FAQ

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2 out of 2 people found the following review useful.
Retribution from above, 6 March 2011
Author: chaos-rampant from Greece

I love this as a standalone film, but it's a remake, and it's in that function that I find in it a near-apotheosis for Kurosawa's perception, his personal idiosynchracy. In the Bryan Forbes film it's human machination that sets the kidnapping plot in motion, cunning and deception, in Kurosawa's remake it's happenstance, random cruelty. I love the ways in which the remake updates the original Seance on a Wet Afternoon because they're essentially noir as opposed to Hitchcock, mostly because I can recognize the kharmic wheels of fate grinding out a nemesis divina in an uncertain universe which nevertheless is not indifferent to human suffering.

One scene particularly stands out for me in that regard, when the couple discover the young girl inexplicably lyind dead on the floor.

Kurosawa highlights this set up with classical devices of theater, rain and lightning, the acceptable and expected portents of doom, but most importantly, with a cinema of utter, eerie, silence. It's not only that the girl's death is presented like an act of divine retribution, but also that it's quietly accepted as such. The lack of palpable explanation is not mentioned by the characters because, ostensibly, they understand the presence of the figurative devil exacting his dues, as do we. No quarter is given them but none is asked either, and the fatalism of that acceptance stirs things in me.

This of course is foreshadowed earlier in the film. Unlike the original Seance, the couple in the Kurosawa version simply discover the little girl in their house. The folly of keeping with them the girl for own reasons is not a mere scheme for glory but a yearning for a life that matters, for a small moment of feeling useful.

The contrast is quietly heartwrenching, a tragedy, between a cold futile universe and the ordinary couple trying to make sense in it. The Shinto priest the husband calls on to perform an exorcism, tells him that hell exists if you believe in it, it doesn't if you don't. For them, hell exists because they're open to the possibility.

Is the ghostly presence in the film a hijink then, a kind of superfluous spectacle to make palatable the more important things? Yes and no. Ghosts in Shinto folk wisdom are a transmutation of guilt, of bad kharma, but also an aesthetic object of terror. This was never more apparent than with the advent of cinema. Nobuo Nakagawa's novelty of retelling the worn out story of Yotsuya is the filming of his ghosts through torquoise color filters, years before Bava or Corman. Their presence in film serves as both reminder and titilation. Seance gives the ghostly kid character, her haunting makes a difference because it's the haunting of a child. When she menacingly approaches the husband, we expect a certain kind of violence. Instead she merely pounces on him with the impotent anger of a child.

Kurosawa sees himself as nothing more than a genre director. In films like Retribution, I see a director merely trying to break apart convention, for the pleasure or routine of it. Seance is a rare gem in this regard, it ventures for a look beyond the pale, the anguish and damnation of its horror echo through time. The parable matters because it talks of existence.

Still, the man gives us a brilliant genre touch: the medium who can see the dead and be haunted by them but can't speak to them. The existential reading of this can be valuable if we arrive to it by our own admission.

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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Seance (2000)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Spoiler: Huge Plot Hole VStarkwell
Scary??? You have gotta be joking!!! loveyoulongtime-1
Spoiler: question concerning the little girl a_leonardsen
Ghost Lady in red Loumi_171
Region 2 DVD? Emong
Running time? rekordform
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