Based on a pair of once-banned plays by the fin de siècle satirist Frank Wedekind, Alban Berg's operatic swan song charts the rise and fall of a femme fatale, a serial seductress, from life... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Christine Schäfer ...
Lulu
Kathryn Harries ...
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Norman Bailey ...
Patricia Bardon ...
Wardrobe Mistress, Groom, Schoolboy
Stephan Drakulich ...
Painter, Negro
Neil Jenkins ...
Prince, Manservant, Marquis
David Kuebler ...
Alwa
Donald Maxwell ...
Animal Trainer, Athlete
Wolfgang Schöne ...
Dr. Schön, Jack the Ripper
Jonathan Veira ...
Stage Manager, Banker, Medical Specialist, Professor
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Storyline

Based on a pair of once-banned plays by the fin de siècle satirist Frank Wedekind, Alban Berg's operatic swan song charts the rise and fall of a femme fatale, a serial seductress, from life as a society hostess to prostitution and eventual death at the hands of Jack the Ripper. Written by Ulf Kjell Gür

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opera | See All (1) »

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Crime | Drama | Music

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Curious but committed production of probably great opera
28 January 2006 | by (London, UK) – See all my reviews

A terrific gamble on the part of an audacious Glyndebourne production team, this strange staging of Lulu forms the high water-mark of the new house's artistic ambitions.

Central to the production is the career-making performance of Christine Schaefer as the eponymous protagonist, dressed in a fascinating wardrobe which she helped to design herself. Her singing is at one with her acting - free and unconstrained, astonishingly athletic and undeniably sexual.

The rest of the cast are fine too, across the board. Andrew Davis digs the Viennese lyricism and romance out of the haystack of a score. The production however shows Graham Vick on less than inspirational form, with typically clever blocking ideas clashing with obvious metaphors and a production design that, mirroring (once, literally) the new look theatre, neglects the heart of the work.

The experience is comprehensive and romantic, using as they do the Cerha completed 3 Act version. They even use a film , as was the original intention, shot on site at the theatre to cover the interlude of Lulu's arrest. I love it whatever my reservations, unfailingly weeping my way through the horror and pathos of the denouement. 6/10


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